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    Some day, some way, I will go back to my blogging and I want to make it static, so this is another nudge in that direction. Just as a reminder: Static-gen - a list of top static site generates is a great resource.

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      Sad to not see Blosxom on that list, although statically generated files are basically an afterthought for that system.

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      That’s the main reason I left the insane game programmer market. The hours were crazy. Much more reasonable these days. However, I work from home, so the work/home split is a little harder.

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        Work: Checking out Meson to see if I can stop writing project files for all the systems I have to maintain, as I try to create a library to share with 3rd parties. I remain unconvinced, but perhaps. Any other multi-platform build file creation programs you recommend? Google’s gyp and GN just seem like typical Google overkill.

        Home: Still hope to check out pony, he says for like the 5th week in a row…

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          At work: battling on squashing the few remaining (known!) bugs in our move from Qt WebKit to Qt WebEngine. In general, the migration has been smoother than I would have thought, but, as usual, it seems like the last 10% of the process is taking up 90% of the time.

          At home: Too busy really for much. I still really really really want to take a deep dive into Pony

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            Oh man, so many cool tools!

            BTW, you have a typo in the link to the powerline-shell page.

            And the x-macro link too!

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              Thanks, that should be fixed now!

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                Holy…

                My first blog was a bash script that served up raw html. I moved via MT to WP and finally to Blosxom that’s been running statically for years now.

                The real enabler here is stuff like markdown.

                Edit to clarify - for me personally it makes more sense to have my textual content in a “normal” filesystem than stuck in a CMS database.

                Markdown is an ideal markup language for me, it’s very easy to write prose with just occasional elements mixed it, it scales well by interpreting HTML, and it’s almost universal at this point.

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                Pretty good read. I have a very similar story, with a similar timeline (scary really) and I too can’t recall the last time I started a true C/C++ project. Perhaps it doesn’t interest him, but 2 things he doesn’t mention that draw me to Python and Go are their vastly more useful standard libraries for things like string processing and networking, and, at least in Go’s case, a much more plausible way of doing threads. The thought of doing HTTP with C++ gives me the hives, mostly for the reasons he mentions here for why he doesn’t think Rust is mature enough today - there are so many different libraries to do it, with no particular way of deciding which one is “good”.

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                  Libraries are an interesting story, and break down a couple ways: Old vs New, and Nyetwork vs Network.

                  Old vs New is the simple fact we didn’t have JSON or networking or graphics or other things we rely on now when C was in its development phases. We had, at most, attempts at networking, none of which have survived (Arpa went from NCP to TCP/IP after C had become established), meaning that any C network library would likely have been shaped wrong for what we ended up with. Ditto graphics and data serialization. We know what those things look like now, so we can bake those libraries into a programming language core.

                  Nyetwork vs Network is the simple fact we couldn’t reasonably develop a “CPAN for C” (CCAN?) before pervasive networking solved the distribution problem. People got new C libraries from their OS vendor at the speed of a station wagon full of tapes. This means non-core C libraries are still a bit more annoying to get unless you’re one of the anointed few who use a package manager such as apt-get or yum.

                  Maybe this implies something about language development, but maybe the second factor solves the first: Do languages cycle in and out based on what libraries they’re new enough to ship with, or does the fact we can download new libraries these days mean Python or Go are going to stick around? Or is the field mature enough now we’ll never have a serious revolution in how major system components change again?

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                    We had serialisation before JSON. There were ASN.1, canonical S-expressions, netstrings … JSON only won because lazy programmers used eval until it was in the standard library.

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                      We had multiple data serialization standards before JSON, like we has multiple network standards before TCP/IP and multiple graphics standards (hardware) before raster graphics.

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                    FWIW, he basically found a very old issue WRT epoll; I left a comment on the issue for others finding it in the future. Basically you can call epoll directly, but mio is the cross-platform binding to this that everyone uses, and Tokio is the higher-level network stack.

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                    Whoa - dizzying, but in a good way.

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                      Sounds like our pain trying to get our code to work with WebRTC. Things were (still are?) changing so fast, and at such a different rate for each browser, it became impossible to keep up, even using a shim.

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                        I’m amazed that this hasn’t been submitted before!

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                          yeah, isn’t it a decade old?

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                            Protobuf is. gRPC is more recent. Well, at least the publicly released version.

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                            It has been submitted before

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                              Ha! Apparently by me, even!

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                                Ahh, yeah, you submitted the /docs link, while I just used the base URL, so the check for duplicate link didn’t work. Sorry about that!

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                            Sorry for the presumably dumb question, but what is “Modules TS” anyway? It isn’t even defined in the linked article.

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                              Related site: LightVM

                              But what is this TinyX (a tool that enables creating tailor-made, trimmed-down Linux virtual machines) they speak of? All I find in a search is a “tiny” X server.

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                                But what is this TinyX (a tool that enables creating tailor-made, trimmed-down Linux virtual machines) they speak of?

                                https://github.com/sysml/lightvm/issues/1

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                                  Ah, good piece of information that perhaps should have been mentioned in the paper as “not ready for prime time”.

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                                Brilliant

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                                  I like the URL title better: The sad state of Linux socket balancing

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                                    Are there really no others or should the title have been “/a/ web framework for Go”?

                                    Also, the docs seem like they could do with some proofreading.

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                                      Maybe they think it is the only one you’ll need? :)

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                                      Not sure why I find these deep dives into the guts of a program so interesting, but I do!

                                      You can find a similar approach here: Writing C software without the standard library

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                                        Job 1: Trying to figure out just how to get through locked down firewalls via just 80/443. Need to come up with a URL scheme to get the requests to our servers. Document the Salt work I’ve done so far. Write some Python support scripts. Perhaps begin the slow withdrawal here finally.

                                        Job 2: QWebEngine work has been going pretty well. Initial prototyping was good, now to fold it into our code and #ifdef it for choosing between it and QWebKit. Get our internal JavaScript working completely asynchronously.

                                        Home: Not much time for technical stuff. Our co-op gaming group will start Ghost Recon: Wildlands, assuming I can get it to run better.

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                                          that was about as smooth a transition as I have ever been part of - congrats to the whole team!

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                                            Can you fix the link to the place where you say you can read this article on IPFS here - where here links back to your article? I assume it should go somewhere else.

                                            But it looks real interesting.

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                                              That link is right. It’s pointed at an ipfs gateway (ipfs.io), which is what the story link here also points to. So yes, you’re reading the article hosted on ipfs.

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                                                As duclare said, I posted the link from an IPFS gateway instead of my server. Which means you are already reading the article on IPFS.

                                                Also if you have IPFS installed on your computer, you can read directly from that.

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                                                  I misread that completely! I though it said “you can read about IPFS here” Doh!

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                                                Non-fiction: I’m still working through Naomi Klein’s “No Is Not Enough”, and am trying to decide on the best historical book to read about the Opium Wars (advice welcome!).

                                                Fiction: just started Annie Proulx’s “Barkskins”, really rich and dense in the first couple of sections so far. Just finished James Ellroy’s “The Cold Six Thousand”, the second part of his America Trilogy, it’s superb stuff, such a furious pace and yet still so much to find between the lines.

                                                Tech: planning to pick back up on working through the Elm tutorials, got distracted by work a few weeks ago. Pah, work. ;-)

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                                                  I think The Cold Six Thousand is the best of Ellroy’s books, although I am also very fond of LA Confidential and The Big Nowhere. I very much enjoy the black-hearted misanthropy.

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                                                    Agree, it’s pretty amazing. Don’t know if I’d say it’s completely misanthropic as there’s a real sense of sympathy for the main characters’ journeys to where they get to - certainly Janice, Barb, Arden (hmm maybe there’s a theme there!) but also Ward and even Wayne Junior - and the extraordinary circumstances that find them there. But of course he absolutely shines a surgical light on the brutal, cold, dark hearts of many - which I very much enjoy too, even if it leaves me pretty stunned. The ending. Whoa, the ending. PRIMAL JUSTICE.

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                                                      I feel that the time is right for a Prestige TV adaptation of the Underworld USA books.

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                                                    Small world - I just started The Cold Six Thousand the other day. I picked it up (and a bunch of others) based on a list by author Adrian McKinty called Dirty Cops. I’m finding it a little hard to read because another book in that list (well, in this case I read the first book in David Peace’s Red Riding series) is written in the same breathtaking way and it’s pretty exhausting to read!

                                                    BTW, if you haven’t read any McKinty, you really must. His Sean Duffy series, starring a Catholic detective in the Protestant Belfast police force during The Troubles, is amazing.

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                                                      Thanks, I’ll check him out! I really like good crime novels but find few are really well written so a good tip like this is always very welcome.

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                                                        Well, I could go on and on about mystery & crime novels, but I’ll just throw a few out there -

                                                        • Philip Kerr’s Bernie Gunther series - start with the “Berlin Trio” and go from there. The trio (ie, first 3) is tremendous and while some of the later ones vary in quality, the newest one, Prussian Blue, is also fantastic

                                                        • For new ones, I’ve really enjoyed the first 2 books in Owen Laukkanen’s Stevens & Windermere. There’s some interesting writing and the tension of the interplay between the two is unique

                                                        • And if you like to mix sci-fi with your mystery, you could do worse than Ben H Winters’ The Last Policeman, about the end of the world and a novice detective trying to solve a murder.

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                                                          Whoa, that’s great, thanks! The Winters one in particular looks up my street.

                                                          Sounds like you’re pretty well informed on this, but in case you haven’t come across them, I’ve enjoyed Fred Vargas novels, specially the early Adamsberg series (Chalk Circle Man) and The Three Evangelists. Very detailed research and some really nice character touches. Gets a bit formulaic later on. Also Pierre Lemaitre, he’s a Prix Goncourt winner so he knows his stuff - the Camille series is very good, pretty gruesome in places but if you’re down with Ellroy this won’t be a problem ;-)