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    I like to think of myself as a CLI tool connoisseur—but I’ve hardly heard of any of these before. Great job!

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      Most of them are not that old. You are still hip.

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        Thanks! :)

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        Unless you already know your users will want man pages, I wouldn’t bother also outputting them as they just aren’t used often enough anymore.

        I think this advice is unfortunate. It’s not often that we happen to agree on a single standard, so when we do, I think we should be careful about dismissing it. Man pages are one such standard, e-mail is another one.

        I get that it’s an extra step that some developers don’t feel is worth taking, but I think there’s a correlation between projects with man pages and projects with good documentation in general.

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          It’s not a standard if it doesn’t work on windows at all

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            That’s because what man pages document – command-line tools – have never been popular on Windows. Most are ported from Unix and run in a Unix-like environment: WSL, Cygwin or even just Bash. Very few people use the native Windows console.

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              That is not at all true. CLIs are very popular right now on windows especially in the node and front-end community. Over 30% of users of our CLI are Windows users. Most of these users are using cmd. The other documentation methods work fine for windows users. Sticking with man leaves them in the cold.

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                CLIs are very popular right now on windows especially in the node and front-end community.

                You are right, of course, but my comparison was relative to how popular CLIs are among Unix users.

                The other documentation methods work fine for windows users. Sticking with man leaves them in the cold.

                But the other documentation methods don’t work as fine for many Unix users.

                I’m not suggesting that we “stick” to man pages and ignore everything else. But that’s what the article is suggesting, except the other way around: that developers ignore man pages.