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    Here’s my list from my saved folder - mostly code, a little game design, and I’ve edited out the career/entrepreneurship stuff:

    • 2290-larubyconf2013-refactoring-fat-models-with-patterns-large
    • Benjamin C. Pierce - A Deep Specification for Dropbox
    • Ben Orenstein - Refactoring From Good to Great
    • Bret Victor - Media for Thinking the Unthinkable
    • Brian Cantrell - Fork Yeah! The Rise and Development of illumos
    • Brian Will - Object-Oriented Programming is Bad
    • Cybersecurity as Realpolitik by Dan Geer presented at Black Hat USA 2014
    • Evan Czaplicki - Let’s be mainstream! User focused design in Elm
    • Everything you need to know about cryptography in 1 hour - Colin Percival
    • Gary Bernhardt - Boundaries (RubyConf 2012)
    • Gary Bernhardt - Boundaries (SCNA 2012)
    • Gary Bernhardt - Capability vs. Suitability - Mountain West Ruby Conference
    • Gary Bernhardt - Deconstructing the Framework (Baruco 2012)
    • Gary Bernhardt - Fast Test, Slow Test
    • Gary Bernhardt - TDD and Unit Tests (Seattle SC Meetup Feb 2012)
    • Gary Bernhardt - Testing Units - PyCon 2013
    • Gary Bernhardt - The Birth and Death of JavaScript
    • Gary Bernhardt - Those Who Forget The Past
    • GoGaRuCo 2014- Refactoring Ruby with Monads
    • Greg Wilson - What We Actually Know About Software Development
    • J.B. Rainsberger - Integration Tests Are a Scam
    • John Hughes - Why Functional Programming Matters
    • Jonathan Blow - F2P
    • Justin Searls - How to Stop Hating Your Tests
    • Justin Searls - The Social Coding Contract
    • Katrina Owen - 467 tests, 0 failures, 0 confidence (Railsberry 2013)
    • Leslie Lamport - Thinking Above the Code
    • Mark Lentczner - Haskell Amuse-Bouche
    • Martin Jonasson and Petri Purho - Juice It or Lose It
    • Mike Action - Data-Oriented Design and C++ - CppCon 2014
    • Misko Hevery - Don’t Look For Things
    • Misko Hevery - Unit Testing
    • Peter Bhat Harkins - Lessons of Liskov - wroc_love.rb 2016
    • Peter Harkins - What Comes After MVC - RailsConf 2015
    • Richard Stallman - Free Software - TEDx Geneva 2014
    • Rich Hickey - The Value of Values
    • Sandi Metz - Go Ahead Make a Mess
    • Sandi Metz - Grit and Determination
    • Sandi Metz - Nothing is Something - RailsConf 2015
    • Sandi Metz - The Magic Tricks of Testing (Rails Conf 2013)
    • Scott Wlaschin - Domain modelling with the F# type system
    • Simon Peyton-Jones - Escape From the Ivory Tower - The Haskell Journey, From 1990 to 2011
    • Tim Ewald - Programming with Hand Tools
    • You Suck at Excel with Joel Spolsky
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      Peter Bhat Harkins - Lessons of Liskov - wroc_love.rb 2016

      Peter Harkins - What Comes After MVC - RailsConf 2015

      ಠ_ಠ

      (kidding!)

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        Hey, hey, how’d that jackass sneak in there?

        (This list got a quick :%s/\.[^\.]*// and skim for business talks, I didn’t notice. Hope they’re not too out-of-place.)

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        Man, you were ready for this thread!

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          Yep. It came up in elsewhere about a month ago, so I’d already cleaned up ls into a markdown list.

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          I’d love to take a peek at that career/entrepreneurship stuff if you’d be willing to share :-)

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          Going to try to pick up Elm again, for the purpose of writing a game. Tried last year, let’s see if it goes better this time…

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            Just out of curiosity, any arguments to favor Elm over Reason?

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              I like Reason, but it doesn’t enforce purity. IMO that’s the big reason to use Elm instead.

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                Ecosystem mainly - though Reason certainly seems very interesting as well!

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                Elm is great! I really liked the new error messages in the latest 0.18. They’re a bit overdue for an updated version though.

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                Cool that you went and did this! I built @technomancy’s atreus a while back, but don’t actually use it. I should, though…

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                  Thanks - that’s a very cool looking keyboard!

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                    Why don’t you use it?

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                      The reason I don’t use it is simply because I don’t want to become dependent on it. @technomancy travels everywhere with his, and sets it up on top of his laptop keyboard. I could try that, I suppose, but it seems like a habit that’d be very hard to get into. Above all, I don’t have pain from regular laptop keyboards, so the increased ergonomics haven’t pushed me into it by necessity.

                      But, now that I’m saying this, I really should give it more of a chance, and try it again… There’s no reason not to, for sure.

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                        I don’t think learning a new keyboard will prevent you from using your laptop keyboard.

                        I switch freely between a maltron 3d and a thinkpad keyboard. The biggest challenge is learning the new keyboard in the first place (about 2 months for the maltron)

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                          You’re right, it doesn’t stop me from using a different keyboard. I spend enough time away from my desk, though, that I feel I’d have to bring it with to ever get comfortable with it.

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                    Feeling inspired, and just signed up: https://mastodon.social/@jesper

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                      Going to try to write a better AI for QuickGo as GNU Go can’t seem to be configured to play capture-go. Open to suggestions/tips from anyone with experience in this area!

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                        Been using http://www.duplicati.com/ on Linux with encrypted cloud sync to gdrive. So far so good (~4GB compressed data)

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                          Long time no post… Just finished writing instructions for using Travis-CI with Monkey Test It. This week I’m going to try to add screenshot support to the report view.

                          1. 2

                            @Work: Getting into docker & coaching the team on how to use it for service management for an upcoming project. @Home: Continuing work on my first Ionic project - impromptu. Got it up and running reasonably well on Android. Now trying to sort out the iOS packaging issue, as I’m a Linux user without any easily accessible Mac. Currently looking into MacInCloud and similar.

                            edit: formatting

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                              And still, no mention of generics coming to the language at some point.

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                                This was brought up during the panel discussion later that day.

                                TLDR was roughly: They aren’t opposed to it. Just haven’t yet found a proposal that’s idiomatic and makes sense. Contributions welcome.

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                                  I have to confess that I also don’t understand the obsession with Go and generics. If you want a language with generics and a good concurrency story, you can look at Rust or Nimrod. Different languages make different trade-offs on the simplicity/power dynamic; part of Go’s general appeal is that it’s exceedingly simple, and part of Rust’s and Nimrod’s appeal is that they opted for more power.

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                                    See also: http://golang.org/doc/faq#generics

                                    “This remains an open issue.”

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                                      Do not take this defensively now, but I have heard this lots of times and it has also been mentioned in several Go meetings. I respectfully disagree. It is a non-argument that always gets brought up as the usual Pike defense.

                                      I do not believe that it is his will to actually resolve this issue within a reasonable amount of time, if at all. I begin to think that In his view, true parametric polymorphism is not something Go should be going after, given that structural sub-typing can serve its goals. We can discuss about the fallacy of this for centuries to no avail. Yes, parametric polymorphism may be more difficult to reason with, but it is also more powerful, expression-wise.

                                      Also, the question is not about choosing another language like Rust, Nimrod, D - the question is whether it makes sense for a seriously competitive language in 2014 to not possess such a feature and have it thrust upon the language at some indeterminate point. Saying that it is an open issue does not mean anything about it being actually on the roadmap, at all.

                                      As for contributions being welcome, I do not believe that any contribution without Pike explicitly backing it a priori would have any luck; it will have to come from somebody from the immediate Go design niche given that the criteria of “not liking it and not making sense” can be kind of arbitrary for the eventually interested outsider. Not exactly advisable to contribute under such a constraint, at least for some of us.