Threads for jjasghar

  1. 24

    You Suck at Excel by Joel Spolsky is a classic. There’s a line in it about how every few months there’s a new startup pitching the Excel pivot table feature.

    1. 3

      Thank you for this; I had heard about it in passing a year or two ago, but never actually looked it up. Looking forward to watching it this evening.

      1. 3

        This is so good! Thank you. I ran across this a while ago, but never got more than a few minutes into it; watched the whole thing and took notes.

      1. 2

        here’s the actual code: https://git.j3s.sh/j3s.sh/tree

        It’s clever, not gonna lie.

        1. 2

          I do admit, I like how the page is hosted on netilfy, talking about GitHub pages :)

          1. 4

            A long journey indeed. Congrats Hashicorp and my Hashicorp friends!

            1. 0

              It would be awesome if we could get at least one of:

              • python
              • ruby
              • javascript
              • rust
              • go
              1. 3

                Continuing on with my Leaving Earth playing. Last week I burned up Buzz Aldern on retry, causing me to lose my game. I now have a running list of Astronauts I lose, and a shortcut to start playing Danny Boy on my Sonos.

                1. 7

                  I’ve learned something from this about how to be kind to people who have been hurt. In the future, that will help me be kind to people in other situations, which is what I hope to do.

                  I mean if that’s true, he’s is trying to grow right? Part of acceptance is to give the benefit of the doubt. I know he’s nowhere near the influence he used to be, and probably never will be again.

                  I don’t salute this, if anything it’s the expected bare minimum, but I applaud that he’s at least making the effort to explain and at least saying he’s trying to grow.

                  1. 18

                    I don’t salute this, if anything it’s the expected bare minimum, but I applaud that he’s at least making the effort to explain and at least saying he’s trying to grow.

                    I agree that there are aspects of this statement that are laudable, but from my perspective this statement doesn’t move the needle around the core issue that someone with his self admitted problems probably shouldn’t be in tech leadership in 2021.

                    1. 7

                      There’s a lot of people who are viewed as tech leaders who I think are bad people with bad values around technology, and whose political goals I personally would like to see undermined. Stallman is not one of those people (at least with respect to software, I don’t claim to agree with every position the man has ever held).

                      1. 20

                        Read his personal response statement. The problems in question have nothing to do with software.

                        They have to do with women around him consistently reporting that he has no respect for their boundaries over the course of the last 30 years.

                  1. 3

                    I’m an old sysadmin, so yeah, Nagios Core is my go-to. I’ve tried so many times to move away from it, but with NRPE, ansible, and Nagios Core I can get useful monitoring up with email in like 3ish hours.

                    Then it just sits there and I add things to it when needed.

                    1. 7

                      I can get useful monitoring up with email in like 3ish hours.

                      I’m kind of sad that this seems normal. I really expect there to be some out-of-the-box, cover 90% uses case that would take five minutes to set up with automation - or just an hour if doing it “by hand”.

                      1. 3

                        Yeah, it’s a problem that tons of companies have tried to fix. I really tip my hat to my friends at Sensu; they have been fighting the good fight for years.

                        They have some great technology, example, youtube here, but I default to what I know for my personal stuff. Been Nagios for going on over a decade, still gonna be Nagios in a decade in the future.

                        Edit: Nagios is so mainstream that Grammarly knows it, but not Kubernetes?

                        1. 2

                          I think most of the companies that have succeeded with making that easy end up charging more than you’d like to pay for a small setup. Datadog* seems to be that easy for basic use cases, but it costs more than you’d want for a side project.

                          • I’m a former DD employee, FYI.
                      1. 2

                        Maybe building some spreadsheets around Leaving Earth. I’ve been playing solo, and I’m starting to get the hang of it. But I feel I lack observability.

                        1. 1

                          I seem to rebuild my router at least once a year before purchasing a pfsense appliance.

                          I did finally write down the minimal viable how-to for me for the next time though: https://jjasghar.github.io/blog/2020/02/14/centos-8-as-my-new-router/

                          1. 4

                            Can I draw on it? I was only able to create squares, modify text, and move things around. Couldn’t figure out how to freeform draw.

                            1. 1

                              Oh good, I was worried a was the only one that couldn’t figure it out.

                              I do have to say though, I could see using this to organize some flow charts and logic would be very very useful.

                            1. 17

                              There’s a video that I think explains quite well why RMS was kicked out. It’s called 100% Right and 100% Fired (50min, but please don’t just judge it on the title).

                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDO24U3hMkU

                              Basically: he wasn’t wrong about the thing he was fired for, but it was just the latest thing that pissed a bunch of people off, and this was the tipping point.

                              IMO removing RMS from leading the FSF was the right thing to do, regardless of the Epstein thing - RMS makes a terrible politician (toejam, the flower nostril thing, etc), and fundamentally the FSF is at it’s core a political organisation not a technical one.

                              1. 4

                                Yet the point of the board is not the political talking, but the direction it is to take.

                                1. 10

                                  Boards of such foundations are particularly political posts and directors are also meant to keep close ties and relationships and do outreach work. It may be that RMS posting is only to keep a contact to the GNU project, but it’s still a political position and posting. The post could also be filled by someone else.

                                2. 3

                                  FSF is one of many organizations fighting to liberate ideas. We need FSF to be the best FSF it can be. No one not in the software world (and probably more than half IN the software world), knows who the f*ck FSF is, so FSF trying to be mainstream wouldn’t do anyone any good.

                                  There’s also ACLU, EFF, InternetArchive, Wikipedia, Mozilla, Linux Foundation, and plenty more who are more widely known and can do politics better.

                                  People like authenticity and courage, and I don’t think you can find a more authentic and courageous person than RMS. It is much easier to be on board the open source/fsf train today than it was in the ‘80’s. How many of you would dedicate decades of your life to such a cause and endure endless ridicule and threats b/c you believed your math was right and you were doing the right thing for the world, despite 99/100 people aligning against you?

                                  1. 6

                                    Sure, and perhaps he was the right person for the position in the ‘80s. I don’t think that holds true today — I think he turns more people off the movement these days than on.

                                  2. 1

                                    FSF is at it’s core a political organisation not a technical one.

                                    This is very true. FSF as said in many words here, used to fight the “corporate overlords” but in the world we live right now, there are many many other organizations that do this. FSF is almost knee-jerk reacting to stay relevant, and my gut tells me most/if not all of the people here see that it’s a failed miss understanding and maybe the “only thing they can do” type situation.

                                    Are you sure FSF isn’t a GNU/political organization? :P

                                  1. 50

                                    A thought I’ve seen from several people: if a movement is as dependent on the constant personal presence and involvement of one of its founders as the Free Software movement is alleged to be dependent on Stallman, is that really a sign that the movement is healthy and strong? If it just can’t possibly get along without him occupying high leadership positions, well, the dude’s not getting any younger. Is there even a future for the FSF and the Free Software movement when simple human mortality eventually catches up to him?

                                    1. 54

                                      if a movement is as dependent on the constant personal presence and involvement of one of its founders as the Free Software movement is alleged to be dependent on Stallman

                                      I don’t think it is. In fact, I think Stallman’s involvement is holding the movement back, and has for many decades.

                                      1. 9

                                        I wonder how much of this was nobody being willing to tell him to his fact that he’s an embarrassment and an anachronism and that he should take some time away to enjoy retirement and consider his life choices.

                                        This is 2021. I have a ton of empathy for social mal-adjustment. In many ways I still suffer from that myself but have had the benefit of some amazing people around me who’ve helped me grow past some of the worst of it, BUT this isn’t just his hobby project anymore.

                                        Free software represents the beating heart of some truly mission critical pieces of infrastructure in modern society. I maintain that if he truly cared about the cause more than feeding his own ego he’d have stayed on the sidelines.

                                        1. 6

                                          As do I, but for some reason a lot of people seem to think that RMS is too important and can never be removed or retired.

                                          1. 26

                                            I think that a lot of people are hung up over the reasons Stallman got removed. You can argue, quite reasonably, that he should have been removed for those particular comments about Minsky and such. Opinions will undoubtedly differ over this, and that’s okay. But … that’s not really what happened: people made those comments seem much worse than they actually were by removing the context and interpreting them as if they were made in the most bad-faith way possible, and several major newspapers ran headlines that were, quite frankly, just misleading and downright wrong.

                                            If we get in to an argument at the pub and I shove you out of anger then I’m clearly in the wrong, but if you go around telling people I beat you up then that’s not exactly fair.

                                            It would have been much better if we had a much broader discourse about whether Stallman is a good leader (he’s not) where this particular issue was just a part the discussion surrounding Stallman’s suitability. This would, I hope, have led to his forcible resignation in more or less the same way (even better would have been if he had voluntarily resigned after realizing he’s not the best person to lead the movement, but I rate the chance of that very very low).

                                            Some people would still have been upset, but at least it wouldn’t have triggered the “fairness” feeling and people wouldn’t still be so hung up on it. The end result would have been the same, but the road you use to get there really matters for these kind of things.

                                            Anyway, my point is, this isn’t really about Stallman leading the movement as such, it’s about people feeling he was treated unfairly by some internet mob, and to be honest they’re not completely wrong either. Even when someone does something wrong they deserve the proverbial “fair trail”, and Stallman was denied this. It’s about the redemption of him as a person, rather than as a leader. Some of the replies to my comment on HN are a good example of this, as are some of the comments here.

                                            But it is what it is, has been a year and a half, and high time to move on. Life is unfair, and Stallman is a big boy who can look out for himself. Besides, in the grand scheme of things this is a rather minor unfairness.

                                            1. 16

                                              Even when someone does something wrong they deserve the proverbial “fair trail”, and Stallman was denied this.

                                              I don’t agree with this statement. He resigned from MIT. Universities have procedures for investigating conduct of their employees, especially research staff. He could have gone that route. It is likely that his chances were slim.

                                              At no point, he was denied anything. It’s also not like he was asked to take a position on the things he took positions for.

                                              The other angle is that the general public should conduct fair trials, which is… just not possible.

                                              1. 5

                                                To be honest I’m don’t fully know with what happened at MIT and his position there; it’s not really the thing Stallman is known for or a position that was really all that important, comparatively speaking. I’m not bothered in the slightest that he had to leave that position, or any other. If anything I wish he had resigned from GNU as well and went in to actual proper retirement. It’s just some parts of the road that led up to that I find somewhat distasteful, and also harmful.

                                                The other angle is that the general public should conduct fair trials, which is… just not possible.

                                                I mean “trail” in a broad/poetic sense; not as an actual, well, trail. a fully fair public “trail” is perhaps impossible, but it sure could have been more fair. I think it was completely fair to criticise Stallman, but if you’re going to do that then do it on stuff he actually said and not based on stuff he, well, didn’t.

                                                Also: someone flagged my previous comment as spam; lol?

                                                1. 6

                                                  Also: someone flagged my previous comment as spam; lol?

                                                  My $.02 - people REALLY abuse the flagging system, often for clearly spiteful reasons.

                                                  I don’t get it. These tools are a Big Stick.

                                                  1. 5

                                                    It’s not so bad – it’s just a single flag. As far as these kind of controversial topics go that seems pretty good. I just thought it was funny they chose spam of all reasons. Troll or even unkind I could understand I suppose, but spam?!


                                                    This message was sponsored by Coca Cola.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      It’s just a fact of life in these hellthreads.

                                                  2. 3

                                                    It was my impression that he did not have any sort of formal position at MIT. He had access to an office, but this was a courtesy only. Am I incorrect?

                                                    1. 13

                                                      He was a “visiting scientist”, which is a “formal position” in that the MIT has such a concept and it has reporting requirements. One could even say that him holding that position over more than 1 year is a bit of rule bending. A “courtesy” by an institution such as the MIT also has monetary value (in that Stallman did not need to pay for office space and it comes with credibility).

                                                      It’s a bit unclear whether Stallman still has this office, his website declares that he had it until “around 1998”, in which time he was also living there.

                                                      https://stallman.org/rms-lifestyle.html https://research.mit.edu/research-policies-and-procedures/visiting-and-affiliate-appointments

                                                      All the more a reason why I don’t get the call for a “fair process” - courtesies and hosting guests is explicitly “at will” and I don’t see where any expectation that it should be otherwise comes from?

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Thanks for clarifying.

                                                        And I agree that MIT not continuing to extend the courtesy of the “visiting scientist” position and the office is entirely uncontroversial.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Happy to!

                                              2. 12

                                                I have to disagree, every time Stallman isn’t around it looks like Free Software slowly becomes secondary to some kind of other social justice movement and Open Source (or some kind of malformed aberration masquerading as open-source) claws away at more and more ground.

                                                1. 17

                                                  The problem is if rms is all that’s standing between OS and FS, then him and the movement aren’t doing a good job of it. Preaching to the converted can only get you so far.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    That’s because, arguably, the pragmatic approach gets more done.

                                                    You can argue that the FSF’s rigorous adherence to philosophical purity is incredibly important and that free software would never be where it is today without it, and you’d be right, but beyond a comparatively small but incredibly important set of software, a more pragmatic approach will get you broader adoption and support.

                                                    Kinda hard to ignore that.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      If we take the pragmatism path, we end up with Open Source, which is similar, but not quite the same.

                                                2. 10

                                                  Bingo. Everyone’s looking at the sideshow, but no one pays attention to the fact rms is not really good at leading a movement, yet somehow has become the single factor for leadership in free software. Will it all crumble like Tito’s Yugoslavia when he goes away?

                                                  A movement isn’t a movement with a single leader, it’s a cult of personality.

                                                  1. 8

                                                    Bingo. Everyone’s looking at the sideshow, but no one pays attention to the fact rms is not really good at leading a movement, yet somehow has become the single factor for leadership in free software.

                                                    This is an (unintentional) strawman. While I do know some people who were very big fans of RMS, at the same time he’s always been presented as a socially-maladjusted radical. There’s no real ‘leadership’ to the free software movement. RMS never made executive decisions which software would or wouldn’t get built. He had a lot of say about the GPL and emacs (his creations), but he was never able to prevent the adoption of other licenses. Or editors, for that matter.

                                                    There have been multiple attempts to sideline him. The Open Source movement being one of them (although ESR turned out to be a much, much, much worse choice of figurehead than RMS ever was or will be).

                                                    The notion that he held a position of significant power (outside running the marginal FSF) is a bit strange. He held a position of influence.

                                                    1. 6

                                                      That comparison is… odd, if you just look at it for a second.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        I am probably biased, as I grew up in said Yugoslavia, but I’m not sure I understand the problem.

                                                        1. 3

                                                          I wouldn’t go as far as calling it problematic, but It’s odd if you compare scenarios that may happen if RMS “leaves” (which he kinda already did) to what happened after Tito’s death. An even (rough) match highly improbably (the GNU project actually has longrunning and collaborative teams, that will probably carry on). It’s highly likely that it will play out in ways where the above statement dilutes into “when leaders go, fundamental changes happen”. Which then makes it odd why Tito, of all people.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Thanks, makes sense. And I’m sorry for unintentionally replacing “odd” with “problem”.

                                                        2. 2

                                                          I admit just waking up, so the comparison isn’t probably the best. I still stand by the remarks on what happens to a movement with a single point of failure.

                                                      2. 6

                                                        Is there a possibility simple mortality is the reason for his return? He’s a sixty-something programmer, those aren’t in high demand, plus no high-profile company will employ him now.

                                                        If he’s made a fortune as lead developer of Emacs and President of the FSF, he’s been able to hide it very well. The ‘position’ might just be a way for him to avoid homelessness.

                                                        1. 31

                                                          The ‘position’ might just be a way for him to avoid homelessness.

                                                          I’m just going to lay my own cards on the table here: RMS has nobody to blame but himself if he’s in such dire straits. Not some nebulous bogeyman of “cancel culture”. Not journalists. Not newcomers to software communities. Just simply himself.

                                                          Even according to people who like him (I’m not one of them – my only in-person interaction with him was not pleasant), he has more or less spent his entire adult life being told that his personal behavior (which is not the same as his philosophical stances on software or freedom) is… let’s call it “extremely antisocial” to be charitable, but others with more direct and extensive experience of him have used far stronger terms. And effectively he just ignored all that because he didn’t seem to take seriously the idea that antisocial behavior might have social consequences. And there’s no argument to be made here about “he just doesn’t understand that stuff”, because we know multiple people made attempts to explain it to him and connect the dots for him. It wasn’t that he doesn’t know or doesn’t understand. It’s that he made the conscious choice to ignore the warnings and explanations given to him, because he thought it wouldn’t ever apply to him.

                                                          And in one sense he was right, because for many years (decades) he was sheltered by people who had power and influence and the ability to offer him protection and patronage. However, those people now have mostly retired, passed away, and/or lost their influence, and so the piled-up consequences of decades of that behavior have caught up with him. But that’s not anyone else’s fault: he simply never seemed to believe that would happen and so never planned for that day or did anything that might change or avert it. Which is an argument for getting him access to good social services, but not an argument for giving him special sinecure positions and status and power again. He was given second, third, fourth, fifth… hundredth chances to hear the stories told by those who know him well, made use of none of them, and we are no longer obligated to keep giving him more.

                                                          1. 16

                                                            There’s a line in a Bojack Horseman episode which goes something like “once you become famous you stop growing up because you no longer need to, you’ll forever be the age at which you become famous. I became famous when I was 24 so I’ll always be 24”.

                                                            While Stallman isn’t “movie star famous”, he’s clear famous in his own way and about as famous as you can get as a programmer without being an abusive multi-billionare twat like The Zuck. Probably all his detriment in much the same way as it was to Bojack.

                                                            I wrote about my own struggles last year (which is a bit rambling 😅). I “grew up”, so to speak, because I had to, which wasn’t always easy and has included things like getting fired (more than once, too…) and broken long-term relationships. But now, at the age of 35 I feel like I’m a much better person than I was 10 years ago in almost every way, and I hope that in 10 years I’ll be a better person still. Not that I’m necessarily a fan of “harsh lessons”, but sometimes they need to be part of the overall package.

                                                            I’m not sure what would have happened to me if I had been in a similar position as Stallman; I’d rather not think about it to be honest because I find it slightly scary. I think the entire thing is a tragedy really.

                                                            That being said, “let the punishment fit the crime” and Stallman living on the streets is not something I desire upon him (or anyone else for that matter).

                                                            1. 16

                                                              I think a better analogy is what some of the really big tech companies do, where they recruit people right out of university and provide a bunch of things: they help you find an apartment near the office, they send a bus that will take you to work, they have a cafeteria where you can get food when you’re hungry… and so you get people who literally went from parents providing those things, to university providing those things, to employer providing those things. And if they ever quit or get fired, they face a huge struggle to do even very basic stuff, because they never had to before.

                                                              If there’s anything other people did that was a fault, it was how much they sheltered Stallman and prevented him from ever needing to become a functioning adult. He was apparently always dependent on there being someone tolerant enough of him and with enough resources to provide for his basic needs, and one day there was no such person left.

                                                              And again, I don’t think he needs to be thrown out on the streets – I don’t think anyone should be. But there’s a wide gulf between “he should have basic needs met” and “he should get to have positions of high status and influence”. We can do one without needing to do the other, and though I suspect our reasons are different, I think you and I agree that the latter is something we do not need to do and should not do in his case.

                                                              1. 8

                                                                Totally agree. As I said above, I would be very much in favor of any effort to ensure RMS doesn’t become homeless, whether it’s his fault or not.

                                                                I have personally made my career on Linux for easily the past 20 years and I know many others have as well, and Linux would not be the success it is without all the hard work of the GNU developers on things like gcc and coreutils. IMO we do owe him for being a big part of that.

                                                                However I see that as a very different thing from “RMS should be in a leadership position at the FSF”.

                                                                1. 6

                                                                  However I see that as a very different thing from “RMS should be in a leadership position at the FSF”.

                                                                  This is my feeling too in a nutshell. Thank you feoh!

                                                              2. 4

                                                                I agree.

                                                                I would personally support the idea of giving him a stipend to ensure he can keep a roof over his head, and I’d even personally chip in to make that happen, because I do think the free software movement literally wouldn’t exist today without him.

                                                                However, if that’s the case, let’s be straight about it and call it what it is, rather than putting him in a leadership position that potentially blights the organization he hopes to lead.

                                                                1. 5

                                                                  However, if that’s the case, let’s be straight about it and call it what it is, rather than putting him in a leadership position that potentially blights the organization he hopes to lead.

                                                                  Agreed 100% At the same time, you can’t expect a person to easily give up an idea that has literally defined their life. I don’t think he’ll ever gracefully retreat into the shadows, even though he should.

                                                                  I would personally support the idea of giving him a stipend to ensure he can keep a roof over his head, and I’d even personally chip in to make that happen, because I do think the free software movement literally wouldn’t exist today without him.

                                                                  Agreed again. And to people who cast this as ‘hero worship’: It’s not hero worship to acknowledge that a flawed person has accomplished something good.

                                                          1. 10

                                                            I’ve used the Kinesis Advantage almost exclusively for about 7 years. I have a wrist injury from a motorbike accident a decade ago that has made me extra sensitive to RSI issues, but with the Kinesis and reduced mouse usage it’s okay. The main drawback is that it’s quite bulky - I’m currently traveling around Africa with one and it takes up a non-insignificant chunk of luggage space.

                                                            There’s a few other similar keyboards, like the Ergodox, but one of them work for me as they don’t have key wells. The Dactyl might be interesting …

                                                            1. 3

                                                              I love my kinesis, but the problem is that I don’t have a really good cadence of cleaning it. I’ve heard yearly/monthly/even weekly. I’d love to start a conversation around that.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                I do it whenever it annoys me, and I don’t really know how often that is. Maybe twice a year? My usual process is to pull all key caps and submerge them in a bleach dilution for a while, then wash them off and wipe/vacuum the rest as appropriate.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Twice a year sounds about what I do for the one I use daily. I snap a picture of the keyboard to help remember what goes where, then pop all the key caps off, and usually clean them thoroughly with a damp cloth. I usually take the whole keyboard apart, and thoroughly clean out any crumbs, dust, etc. For my older Kinesis keyboards I would use Deoxit on the connectors, to try to make them less flaky.

                                                                  I cleaned out a keyboard I’d left sitting unused a few years, and it had spiders inside. So good clean out never hurts…

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    Nice, tazjin and astangl, thanks for the advice.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              They give the impression that stringing a bunch of config files together is all you need to become operational. Get a server, follow the HOWTO and you’re good.

                                                              If the reader needs that HOWTO, they will probably not be aware of how to set up backup and restore themselves. The server is now a ticking time bomb. And that’s just the basic operational concern.

                                                              Or the reader doesn’t need the HOWTO, and the article is just mildly interesting. Great, they use YAML to generate systemd units that run podman, that forwards environment variables to a container.

                                                              1. 4

                                                                The only thing needed to backup the Matrix homeserver state is to save the content of the PostgreSQL database. The steps to do that are in the project README. They are written with updates in mind but apply equally.

                                                                How is the server a time bomb? We took great care to make sure everything auto-updates regularly so that you are not running software with know issues or vulnerabilities.

                                                                Disclaimer: Co-author.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  I didn’t think it was supposed to be a bulletproof how to set up your server guide, more “here’s how you might use CoreOS”. Which is why I liked it, I’ve not seen many good motivating introductions to CoreOS.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    I agree with jaffachchief here, this article is one of those use case examples. Trying to find “reasons” to use CoreOS is challenging, this gives you a happy path to get something working.

                                                                    Sometimes posts like this are just enough to be able to drop your other app in and see it work.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Does anyone actually still use OpenStack? Used it at work 2013-2017 and I don’t have great memories. It got the job done (usually) but was incredibly finicky to keep running and updates were a real pain.

                                                                  Some time later than 2017 some single person told me it has supposedly improved, but that’s all I ever heard about it again.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I was a PTL for two projects in the OpenStack ecosystem (including openstack-chef) and oooh boy it was always hella harder than it needed to be to set up.

                                                                    Part of why I wanted to share this article was that if you step through it it’s insanely easier now to get going, a couple install commands which is pretty neat. If you see the conclusion though, the author sums it up as a good experiment, and “too slow.”

                                                                    I have some hooks still in the OpenStack community, they have gone whole hog into Telcos now, and #openstack-* on freenode is still kicking pretty soilditly.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Full time dvorak user. I got used the positions of hjkl. I try to minimize one-character movements, though.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      W and B, ctrl-D and ctrl-U with crtl on capslock, have become my friends using dvorak.

                                                                    1. 6

                                                                      I have absolutely fallen in love with running https://www.bookstackapp.com/. I put any notes and everything i might need in the “future” in it. The search finds what I’m looking for, and the mobile web frontend allows me to travel with it too.

                                                                      This docker image made it insanely easy to get going: https://hub.docker.com/r/linuxserver/bookstack.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        bookstack looks awesome. I can’t believe it’s not more popular.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        On all of my GitHub actions development, I’ve lived and breathed through https://github.com/nektos/act.

                                                                        It gives me a real feedback loop, and I can at least see things going on locally before pushing anything to GitHub. It’s a start towards what you’re looking for.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Thanks a lot. I will start using it as well.