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    This weekend, I’m finishing up my entry for the No Budget Film Contest … the deadline is July 4th, there’s only one entry so far, and with a grand prize of $5, I gotta try!

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      Cool. What is your film about?

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        surrealism

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      Wow, this is much more dystopian than assuming everyone in the company loves Baseball or Booze and forcing them out for a night of that.

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        Nobody’s “forcing” you to go anywhere. If you’re not interested, just don’t go.

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          Well, it’s not physical force, it’s just the threat of “not being a team player” or “culture fit” or some other phrase that implies “we may uninvite you from your employment if you don’t come.”

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            I think most of that pressure is imagined, TBH. Especially at larger companies that tend to have the lamest events. If you don’t want to say, “I don’t want to go,” tell them you have an appointment or some other schedule conflict.

            Anecdotally, I skip any event that doesn’t seem genuinely enjoyable, and I’ve never had a problem.

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              I do the same but I think you’re underestimating how hard this can be for some people.

              (I’m just anti-social so it’s easy for me :-D )

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        Here’s a pic of my prompt

        It’s available in zsh and bash… I’d love to refactor the zsh one to be as efficient as the bash one, but by zsh-fu is weak and I’m too lazy to bother figuring out why it doesn’t work as expected.

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          If you don’t wanna host it yourself, Github has GH-Pages. GitLab has a similar platform. … Both expect static sites - github uses Jekyll by default, but you could use Hugo or whatever you’d like to generate a static site.

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            the OP use precisely githbu GH Pages

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              Nah they use Netlify.

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            I’m learning to knit!

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              My mom runs a “knitting circle” up in Northern Canada, I don’t know why but it always surprises me the mix of people that show up. Young and old, male and female alike, all walks of life. She used to have a little shop that was wall to wall wool and accessories and all that. Was just crazy the wool she had. The only problem is that I’ve been waiting like 16 years for her to knit me a sweater because every time she starts knitting one someone offers a bunch of money for it when it’s done…

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                Welcome to the hobby! What are you starting out making? And if you haven’t found it already, I highly recommend ravelry for finding projects for the amount of yarn you have and your skill level.

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                  I’ve been wanting to do that! There’s a yarn store across the street from my apartment, and I feel I’m missing an opportunity…

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                    That must be very attractive to the (older) ladies. Good job :)

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                      Hey now don’t be ageist :) The fiber arts attract people of all stripes.

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                        That’s exactly it, I can already make my own cordage and crochet - I just wanna level up.

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                        I fundamentally disagree with this comment, it can appeal to anyone of any gender.

                        I recognize that you aren’t saying that, but you’re saying it explicitly should appeal to one gender more than another.

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                      I feel like the disclaimer isn’t big enough on this post. Rebase will enrage your teammates if you push to the public repo. Even setting up to rebase on git pull might annoy your peers, even though it’s awesome.

                      A word of caution: changing the history of public, stable branches is generally advised against. Editing the history of feature branches and personal forks is fine, and editing commits that you haven’t pushed yet is always okay. Use git push -f to force push your changes to a personal fork or feature branch after editing your commits.

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                        In the immortal words of Doug Gwyn(?): “UNIX was not designed to stop its users from doing stupid things, as that would also stop them from doing clever things.”

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                          It might also be helpful to highlight the less well-known --force-with-lease option as a safer (albeit harder to explain) default.

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                            feel like the disclaimer isn’t big enough on this post. Rebase will enrage your teammates if you push to the public repo. Even setting up to rebase on git pull might annoy your peers, even though it’s awesome.

                            That’s not my experience at all, in fact, in the last several companies I’ve worked at, git pull –rebase and git rebase -i to squash long strings of commits into one for a nice clean merge was considered good etiquette and de rigeur.

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                              I think it says something about git that “Don’t rewrite history on branches you’re sharing with other people” is still not a common understanding.

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                                The number of developers has doubled every ~5 years for decades now.

                                This implies that fully half the workforce has fewer than 5 years experience.

                                “Things you expect everyone to know” are not going to become widespread knowledge until that changes.

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                                  It’s not the newbies’ fault. The CLI encourages mistakes by having bad or missing defaults.

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                                Mercurial makes this distinction clear by enforcing what is a draft commit and what is a published commit (roughly, published commits are those that have been pushed to a publishing repo).

                                Mercurial will disallow rewrites of public commits (but you can always forcibly move them back to the draft phase if you’re so inclined). Together with Evolve which propagates metahistory of which commit replaces which other commit, it’s perfectly reasonable to share and modify WIP commits.

                                There is currently a proposal floating around to give evolve to git, so hopefully some day we will all have a clear understanding of how to share mutable commits.

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                                  When would rebase on pull annoy anyone? It is a local branch that nobody else sees.

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                                  We use Confluence, like we did at my last job.

                                  I fucking hate Confluence.

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                                    Same. It’s awful. Search is a train wreck, and it doesn’t even use wiki-markup.

                                    We also use something like Doxygen, except it errs out instead of generating the docs.

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                                      I’ll be the counterpoint here… Confluence sucks, but I think it sucks less than the other solutions I’ve seen. At least for certain problems, and especially when you need a resource for non-developers.

                                      A sibling comment says “Search is a train wreck”. To which I say: try searching google docs. Confluence search will at least show you matches within a doc when you search, so you have a better chance of figuring out which doc is actually the one you want.

                                      Confluence has the ability to embed various kinds of content in the page, which is quite nice. Google Drawings seems uniquely designed to make ugly drawings. In Confluence, I can use PlantUML or Draw.io.

                                      Their new editor supports typing markdown keystrokes to do formatting. The rollout has been kind of bad, but I think the direction of the new editor is good.

                                      “Spaces” can be confusing at first, but I think it will help us scale up to the organization sanely.

                                      So if the problem you’re solving is “I want to document the API of this project”, Confluence is a terrible choice. If your problem is “I want a place in which all kinds of people in the organization can find docs, discussions, and decisions around various things we’re doing”, Confluence works better than the other choices I’ve seen so far.

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                                        The sad thing with Confluence is they used to (about 5 years ago) have a method of inserting wiki markup so that wiki pages could be generated and pasted in, or if you just didn’t want to use the (frankly awful) WYSIWYG editor you didn’t have to. But they ripped that out.

                                        Atlassian actually paid us a site visit to gauge opinions from everyone in the company. Pretty much everyone in the company asked for wiki markup to come back, to which they responded “huh”.

                                        The API for Confluence is also pretty bad. We have some tools for generating document trees, e.g. when creating documentation for a new service we run a script which creates a tree of pages from templates, but little things like not being able to turn off “notify watchers” on an edit via the API means you can hammer people’s inboxes (which in turn makes Gmail mad).

                                        I agree that it sucks, but sucks less than other solutions. Which in itself is pretty sad.

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                                        We used to use confluence a bit, but we sort of stopped using it because, well, we also don’t love confluence.

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                                          Confluence is awful, but having a constellation of markdown files and Google docs is even worse. One source of truth.

                                          The value we got from Confluence is that it gave a place where we could keep dev stuff next to business stuff, so it was easy for people to reference things more easily and have less silo-ing.

                                          My only real complaint is that integrating with Confluence via a bot is a pain in the neck–we did this to have a wiki automatically updated with product information from deploys and builds, and that was Not Fun.

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                                            The value we got from Confluence is that it gave a place where we could keep dev stuff next to business stuff, so it was easy for people to reference things more easily and have less silo-ing.

                                            Something key here is that business folks generally have little interest in editing Markdown files and using Git. Confluence and other such systems may be monstrously annoying (and they are), but they’re better than alternatives.

                                            Also, it works in the other direction. Devs want constellations of Markdown, but biz likes constellations of Word documents with comments and tracking. Trust me, Confluence is a better choice.

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                                              We dragged them halfway with Confluence, then? We just need to Zeno them to git and markdown (eventually) ;-).

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                                                Of course, that goes both ways—I find Con(ef)fluence’s UI so utterly intolerable that I will interact with it the absolute minimum required to not get fired, which in practice means literally never. So now it’s a wiki just for the business side, which is probably better than the “NAS full of outdated Word documents” approach it probably replaced, but it still not very useful.

                                                Literally any other wiki software I’ve ever seen would be preferable.

                                                But I’m not sure I agree with you that having business and tech share a wiki is a good plan. Business folks love putting paperwork (e.g. “this deployment of this service was signed off on by these people”) into the wiki, which you must never ever ever ever allow, or it will immediately dilute the useful content to homeopathic proportions and make the whole thing useless. So now you either need to be draconian about allowing business folks to put stuff in, in which case they won’t use it, or it turns into a paperwork repository, in which case nobody will use it.

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                                                Confluence is awful, but having a constellation of markdown files…

                                                That’s a bit of a false dichotomy. Most wikis can provide search, history, notifications…

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                                                We use confluence too. I really wish they never made the change to the “smart” editor that prevents users from editing plain markdown (or similar).

                                                Read some of the historical tickets around that change if you’re in the mood to shed a tear.

                                                In the end though, the key thing is to have one central jumping off place to get to your documentation and confluence works ok for that.

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                                                  Hear, hear. It’s a nightmare.

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                                                    I like Confluence. It has a WYSIWYG editor that actually works. Plenty of plugins for lots of features and integrations. Recently it even gained real time collaboration.

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                                                      I can’t add anything new here - we too use Confluence and almost everyone hates it, but as I and dangoor have mentioned in other comments, there might not be anything better.

                                                      One thing we did a while ago was move alert references out of Confluence to a git repo which uses mkdocs. This way if Confluence is down or there’s some network issue meaning we can’t get to it, on-call engineers can still have a local copy of all the alert references.

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                                                      I think it was supposed to be this: https://kk.org/thetechnium/data-manifesto/

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                                                        Yes I messed up the link…

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                                                        I agree that webrings should make a comeback, but WebRing.org still exists and I don’t really see any benefit to having git as the datastore unless you can submit a site without issuing a pull-request. The opengraph/cards are definitely a nice touch though.

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                                                          Wow, one look at WebRing.org explains to me why its existence is not enough to dissuade the creation of a new webring implementation. It’s a mess of ads and poor design. While it’s only nerd-compatible, I do like the idea of an implementation which results in a JSON representation that can be dropped into a static site. To be able to implement modern webrings in a way that doesn’t add to the “one more thing on the net that’s tracking me” seems like a win.

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                                                          This website is an incredible eyesore. I love it.

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                                                            they even provide a solution for people who don’t love it:

                                                            document.head.parentNode.removeChild(document.head);
                                                            
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                                                              Learned that trick from someone who posted it in reply to a previous article.

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                                                                I’ve added it to my list of bookmarklets

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                                                              My eyes!

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                                                                Thanks! Be sure to sign the guestbook.

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                                                                  Yeah, this is definitely what I would define as a ‘kitsch’ website design.

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                                                                  Maybe we can just do what Mastodon does and give people a place to put 5 (and only 5) links - that way we can link out to our Masto or Keybase, or whatever else.

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                                                                    Not a bad idea in general although I feel like the Fediverse is something special and worthy of specific support.

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                                                                    Yep - I don’t post there as much as I do on Twitter, but I’d like to change that… Mostly tech stuff and lots of boosts.

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                                                                      What’s that Disqus alternative again? commento.io?

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                                                                        Yes. Isso is also a good alternative.

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                                                                        It’s always fun to have a collection of back-dated installers for virtualbox, just in case the latest update breaks all of your VMs and tools.

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                                                                          You could do away with most of the markup by applying this to the body tag instead, like I’m doing on tilde.town… might lose some semantics, but you can cut down on total bytes…

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                                                                            Relevant discussion here!

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                                                                            Google employees call themselves Googlers – but if anybody using Google Googled they’d be a Googler, too – So, really, lets keep the Googlers at Google, and everyone else can “search the web” or whatever…

                                                                            Also, never heard of https://wiby.me/ - good find - I especially love the suprize me button

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                                                                              Unless they’re older. In which case they call themselves “Greyglers” which I find endlessly amusing :)

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                                                                              According to explainxkcd it’s using websockets to update the emoji and record votes…

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                                                                                  After taking about 40 minutes to download clojure, npm install, and build the project - this is pretty neat… really wish I saw this live demo link before doing all that.

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                                                                                    On the other hand, you now have the project working locally and can mess around with it yourself. :)

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                                                                                    Wellll…..

                                                                                    jkirchartz.com uses GH-Pages/Jekyll

                                                                                    But I’m hosting my vimwiki (which is actually powered by vim-waikiki now) which could easily be used as a blogging platform.

                                                                                    But also, with pandoc it’s trivial to use Unix as a CMS with markdown files that I use on tilde.town