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    Wellll…..

    jkirchartz.com uses GH-Pages/Jekyll

    But I’m hosting my vimwiki (which is actually powered by vim-waikiki now) which could easily be used as a blogging platform.

    But also, with pandoc it’s trivial to use Unix as a CMS with markdown files that I use on tilde.town

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        ______   ______     ______    __
       /      | /  __  \   /  __  \  |  |
      |  ,----'|  |  |  | |  |  |  | |  |
      |  |     |  |  |  | |  |  |  | |  |
      |  `----.|  `--'  | |  `--'  | |  `----.
       \______| \______/   \______/  |_______|
      
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        I can’t help but notice the kerning is off on that (the C and the O are too close together compared to the rest of the letters). ;-)

        Years back, someone on IRC told me what kerning is, and now I can’t NOT think about it. Ack! :-)

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          Kerning - once you see it you can’t unsee it (even if sometimes you wish you could).

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        More info here and the browser itself is here

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          News about cryptocurrencies, especially from Business Insider, is a better fit elsewhere.

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            Nah this is hilarious.

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              personally, I ignore the cryptocurrency tag - I don’t think much of it - but when something juicy pops up, might as well

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                Juicy stuff is usually gossip, which is usually news, which is usually low-content.

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              I need this as an API (or a node package) and I didn’t even know it until right now.

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                I need this as an API

                For the most part it already is. Probably not too hard to implement a wrapper for the sake of node.

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                Might be fun setting this up with a RasPi and an RFID/NFC reader to badge in/out certain things (assuming your office has badges/keyfobs/whatever)

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                      This is all good advice, but I disagree with “1. Avoid comments.” Self-documenting code is fine if done conscientiously, but I still prefer to follow the age-old advice: “Always code as if the person who ends up maintaining your code is a violent psychopath who knows where you live.” – in the long run it’s easier for a mind to understand human language than for it to parse everything happening in code.

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                        The removed comments include things like “(which isn’t very secure, but works for this)” and “JavaScript’s this keyword doesn’t point to what you might want it to always, and we can’t use these in event listeners”, which IMO is important information that was lost in the translation to self-documenting code.

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                          100% agree with you about the first comment, though I think the second comment doesn’t belong there, since you’ll have to otherwise repeat the same comment in every “component”. The information is still very important though and should definitely be highlighted in manuals/docs.

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                          The main problem with most comments is that they describe what the code actually does, which you can usually work out by reading the code. Useful comments explain why the code needs to do what it does, or why it does it in a non-obvious way. There’s only so much of that that you can convey by variable naming.

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                            Always code as if the person who ends up maintaining your code is a violent psychopath who knows where you live.

                            While its a funny quote and all, I do not recommend seriously adopting this as a mentality. Its a recipe for imposter syndrome, especially for newer developers. Even if you don’t personally have problems with imposter syndrome, knowing others on your team have this type of mentality can be intimidating. Think about it like this… why would I ever write code if I knew there was a chance the person inheriting it would come to my house and murder me? Taken less literally, why would I write code if the person inheriting it is going to resent me for it?

                            We should all try to write better code, but as the person inheriting code it is your responsibility to not be a violent psychopath. I mean that both literally and metaphorically.

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                              I thought that this was a satirical article, so I read the next few points as

                              • “don’t waste time doing something someone else has already done”
                              • “don’t be afraid to use tools that make your life easier” (especially since he ads ‘vim’ to the special tools list, but then says use it…)
                              • “just because code works doesn’t mean all is good”
                              • “don’t overuse version control, especially for very temporary changes”

                              the last two then really confused me, but it’s interesting how you can make a “wisdom” for each side of the argument.

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                              After years of seeing venn diagrams explaining joins it’s nice to see the underlying algorithms explained.

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                                This looks neat.

                                I have a bookmarklet to scrape things and a bunch of other single-purpose scripts, usually built around PyQuery - so I’d say web scraping is pretty good.

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                                  neat website, but I can’t help but think that loading animation might trigger seizures in some people

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                                    Perhaps … cutting edge has its own drawbacks. Like it is not distributed evenly.

                                    W3C works - afaik - on queries for such cases. I’m pretty sure once there is available technology sites like this will use it.

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                                    The animations here are really amazing, visualizing every step of the algorithm and how it could be used

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                                      if I didn’t start making websites in the 90’s, I sure wouldn’t be trying to get into today - even a few short years ago it seems like it was much simpler to get started.

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                                        don’t get overwhelmed by those little boxes …. no one knows them all … I’m practicing making websites since the 90s, and while it’s a herculean job, today is easier than before.

                                        if you want to pick up now start either with javascript / react or clojurescript for fun and enlightment.

                                        the question is however, if it worth learning making websites today.

                                        my feeling is that once one learns all boxes, lets say from front-end, the next year it will be filled with other boxes unrelated to previous year. i think here ar / vr and co.

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                                          Ignoring the severely broken nature of hiring web developers, more and more this or that specific box has been crucial to whether or not you’re invited to interview - less and less respected is proficiency with the core technologies underlying the various frameworks/libraries/tools/etc, because they are now the only thing that matters. If you can learn React (or whatever) in a couple weeks doesn’t really matter when the chain through recruiters, HR, and the hiring manager completely ignore the actual needs of the dev team. That being said - I’ve repeatedly seen people without an understanding of the core technologies welcome onto teams because they were trained in whatever framework/library/workflow the hiring team uses - and they’re able to produce impressive results.

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                                            On the other hand “knows react” is fairly meaningless and you can just set up a hello world and list that you have some react experience. Especially if you know you could work it out quick.

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                                              It doesn’t matter if you did the tutorial, or took a class, or made something bigger on your own – the recruiters and HR demand “professional experience”

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                                          It still is very easy to get started. You don’t need to know 90% of the items on this list to get a job as a junior web dev and once you do that you will just naturally pick up the rest on the way as you need them.

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                                          You don’t have to write JavaScript, you have to write Elixir - which has a much smaller community around it than JavaScript does.

                                          This does look cool though, I just wish there were some live examples I could play with in my browser.

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                                            On the other hand, the Elixir community is very friendly. :)

                                            Supposedly something like LiveView is coming to .NET - https://codedaze.io/introduction-to-server-side-blazor-aka-razor-components/ - but the post says:

                                            We don’t really know yet how well server-side Blazor (Razor Components) will scale with heavy use applications.

                                            In principle, people could take this approach in other languages as well. But I think Elixir / Erlang are uniquely positioned to do it well, as LiveView is built on Phoenix Channels, which (because they use lightweight BEAM processes) can easily scale to keep server-side state for every visitor on your site: https://phoenixframework.org/blog/the-road-to-2-million-websocket-connections

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                                              On the other hand, the Elixir community is very friendly. :)

                                              Is that comment supposed to contrast the friendly Elixir community with the JS community? Is the JS community considered unfriendly? It’s way, way bigger than the Elixir community, so there are bound to be some/more unfriendly people. Maybe it’s so big that the concept of a “JS community” doesn’t even make sense. It’s probably more like “Typescript community”, “React community”, “Node community”, etc… But there are a lot of friendly people and helpful resources out there in JS-land, in my experience. I hope others have found the same thing.

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                                                The Elixir community is still in the “we’re small and must be as nice as possible to new people so they’ll drink the koolaid” phase. The “community” such as it is is also heavily pulled from job shops and the conference circuit, so there’s a big factor too.

                                                Past the hype it’s a good and servicable language, provided you don’t end up on a legacy codebase.

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                                                  Sounds like Rails, all over again.

                                                  Who hurt you @friendlysock?

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                                                    legacy codebase

                                                    How would you define ‘legacy codebase’? I’m assuming it’s something other than ‘code that is being used to turn a profit’..

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                                                      Ha, you’re not wrong! I like that definition.

                                                      From bitter experience, I’d say it would be an Elixir codebase, written in the past 4 or 5 years, spanning multiple major releases of Ecto and Phoenix and the core language, having survived multiple attempts at CI and deployment, as well as hosting platforms. Oh, and database drivers of varying quality as Ecto got up to speed. Oh oh, and a data model that grew “organically” (read: wasn’t designed) from both an early attempt at Ecto as well as being made to work with non-Ecto-supported DB backends, resulting it truly delightful idioms and code smells.

                                                      Oh, and because it is turning a profit, features are important and spending time doing things that might break the codebase are somewhat discouraged.

                                                      Elixir for green-field projects is absolutely a joy…brown-field Elixir lets devs just do really terrible heinous shit.

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                                                        Elixir for green-field projects is absolutely a joy…brown-field Elixir lets devs just do really terrible heinous shit.

                                                        Totally agree, but I would say that significantly more heinous shit is available to devs in Ruby or another dynamic imperative language. The Elixir compiler is generally stricter and more helpful, and most code is just structured as a series of function calls rather than as an agglomeration of assorted stateful objects.

                                                        The refactoring fear is real though. IMO the only effective salve for that sickness is strong typing (and no, Dialyzer doesn’t count).

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                                                          So you’re saying that Elixir is just another programming language? It’s not the Second Coming or anything?

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                                                            I mean, it’s really quite good in a number of ways, and the tooling is really good. That said, there’s nothing by construction that will keep people from doing really unfortunate things.

                                                            So, um, I guess to answer your question: yep. :(

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                                                      😊 I can see how it sounded that way, but I didn’t mean to imply anything about anyone else. The parent post said the Elixir community is small, so I was responding to that concern.

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                                                        Is the JS community considered unfriendly?

                                                        I feel you’re just trying to polemic on the subject… The author of this comment probably didn’t mean harm, don’t make it read like so.

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                                                          I’m not what you mean by “trying to polemic”, that doesn’t make sense to me as a phrase, but it was a genuine question about whether the JS community is considered to be unfriendly. I’d be happy to be told that such a question is off-topic for the thread, and I certainly don’t want to start a flame war, but I didn’t bring up the friendliness of the community. I’m sure the author didn’t mean harm, but I read (perhaps incorrectly) that part of their reply as part of an argument for using Elixir over JS to solve a problem.

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                                                            What I meant to say was: “If this looks like it could be a good fit for thing you want to do, but you’re daunted by the idea of learning Elixir, don’t worry! We are friendly.”

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                                                              I meant starting a controversy, sorry for my poor English! I’m sorry if it felt harsh, that wasn’t what I tried to share. I really thought your goal was to start this flame war.

                                                              Every community has good and bad actors. Some people praise a lot some communities, but I don’t think they mean the others aren’t nice either.

                                                              The only thing that I could think of is that smaller communities have to be very careful with newcomers, because it helps to grow the community. JS people don’t need to be nice with each other, the community and the project are way pas that need. So I guess you would find a colder welcome than with a tiny community.

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                                                                Hey there, polemic is a legit English word, so don’t be sorry for someone else’s ignorance! :)

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                                                                  I’m not ignorant (well I am, but not about this): polemic is indeed an English word, but it’s not a verb. The phrase “trying to polemic” doesn’t make sense in English, it requires interpretation, which makes the meaning unclear. I can think of two interpretations for “trying to polemic” (there may be others) in the context of the comment:

                                                                  1. My comment was polemic
                                                                  2. I was attempting to start a polemical comment thread, aka a flame war. With the later clarification that seems like what the author was thinking.
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                                                                    The thing is that not everyone is at your level of English proficiency. You’re having a discussion here with people from around the world, you’ll need to make a couple of adjustments for expected quality of English and try to get the rough meaning of what they’re saying, otherwise you’ll be stuck pointing out grammatical errors all day.

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                                                                      I wasn’t really trying to point out an English error, and perhaps I did a poor job of that. I stand by the claim that it is an English error though.

                                                                      I work with non-native English speakers all day, I’m aware of the need to try and understand other people and to make sure we’re on the same page. I’ll give a lot of slack to anyone, native or non-native, who’s trying to express themselves. The problem with the phrase “I feel you’re just trying to polemic on the subject’ is that at least some of the interpretations change the meaning. On the one hand, it could be saying that my comment was polemic, on the other it could be saying that my comment was trying to start a polemical thread. It’s not the same thing. And, for what it’s worth, if you’re going to throw an uncommon (and quite strong) English word like “polemic” out there it’s best if you correctly understand the usage. If the author had accused me of trolling, which is I think what they meant, that would have been both clearer and more accurate (though my intent was not to troll)

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                                                      Complaining about large JS-heavy websites from a small website, with about 20kb worth of tracking JS on it… I see how you are…

                                                      but I totally agree “Modern” web design has abstracted us so far away from what’s actually going on between servers & browsers that we can have our site and server in 10 lines of code, with millions of lines of modules behind it, and pretend it’s still only those 10 lines.

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                                                        I’m BOOOKED - I’ve got some WordCamp videos to edit, NaNoGenMo text generators to write, bugfixes/tweaks on my twitter bot (for some reason the cron module isn’t working), plus a family dinner & a Star Wars: Age of Empire game!

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                                                          I just finished my NaNoGenMo (thanks to the Internet being down at home) so now I have the whole weekend to do … I don’t know.

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                                                          what’s the date on this?

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                                                            looks like it’s from 1996

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                                                              what’s the date on this?

                                                              What, you don’t think the DEC Alpha is a modern, relevant architecture? /s

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                                                                Funny enough, the folks at crash-safe.org built their first prototype as an Alpha. I was like, “Huh? Couldnt it be something that wasnt buried by Intel and Fujitsu?”

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                                                                looks like 1996 or so, based on which ACM journal it was going to hit.