Threads for johan

  1. 3

    Expectation: a pure text-based chat system, from a more enlightened age

    Reality: trolls spamming channels with huge ascii-art dildos and/or swastikas, and ddos

    1. 36

      Reality: trolls spamming channels with huge ascii-art dildos and/or swastikas, and ddos

      Not in my reality.

      1. 9

        I’m also surprised to hear that. Unless you explicitly look for troll channels, my experience has either been quiet (but quick to answer) or constantly active, and on topic.

      2. 17

        Never saw anything like that on freenode. Mind me asking - what channels do you visit?

        1. 11

          I can’t say I’ve seen the things that the grandparent comment mentioned, but they definitely wouldn’t be on Freenode. If you limit yourself to Freenode, IRC is a very safe and well-moderated experience, especially on some exemplary channels like the Haskell one.

          I have accidentally wandered into uncomfortable conversations and much worse things on some of the other popular IRC networks, of which quite a few still exist: https://netsplit.de/networks/top100.php

          The same thing is true of sketchy Discord servers as well; it’s not like IRC is unique in this regard.

          1. 3

            A year or two back, Supernets was spamming hard on IRC networks. I forgot if Freenode was affected, but I know a lot of the smaller networks I was on were.

            1. 2

              Not OP, but I spend my time on IRCnet and EFnet since my IRC use is just to stay in touch with friends. Anyway, last year I was DDoS’d pretty hard because someone wanted my nick on EFnet.

              1. 1

                Sometimes I miss #C++ on EFnet, not enough to go back on EFnet, but I do miss it – a lot of wonderful people were there in the late 90s. Freenode feels a lot more sane in terms of management and tools for the system operators. Cloaks and nickname registration go a long way.

              2. 2

                I’m in, like, 15 networks, and never saw anything like that either.

            1. 1

              ~/Dropbox/Notes/, filled with .txt and .md files. Works well on the desktop, but haven’t figured out a good solution on my iPhone yet. (the Dropbox app is ok for viewing, less so for editing)

              1. 2

                I have a similar setup and use 1Writer for editing plaintext files inside of my Dropbox folder.

              1. 3

                My use cases for Dropbox, in descending order of importance:

                1. To ensure photos gets onto the machine which does backups.
                2. To ensure that photos I take are visible to my partner, and likewise, with zero effort. They like to have a look at what I’ve taken recently because it’s fun. I only send photos directly when they are especially I think they will find them especially interesting / amusing.
                3. To make files available on one device that I have on another.
                4. To share large files with people, such as family and friends. Videos, etc.

                Syncthing looks great for 3. but I don’t know of a better alternative for 1, 2 or 4, unfortunately.

                There are plenty of photo sharing alternatives, but I want my photos to be backed up to several places (you know, actual backups, where you keep every states of the archive over time so that even if you accidentally move / delete / corrupt then you can go back).

                There are large file sharing services but they don’t seem as under my control or permanent. I don’t do this enough to care much though.

                1. 1

                  I think nextcloud can be used for the rest, but I’m not entirely happy with the code quality of nextcloud. They seem to be chasing features.

                  1. 1

                    My use cases for Dropbox are similar to yours, with the addition of Dropbox’s “smart sync”. My laptops have tiny hard drives, whereas my Dropbox is almost two terabytes. Tbh could be that Syncthing has a similar feature, I know at least Resilio Sync does.

                  1. 2

                    I’m Finnish (and live in Finland), and quite often both (foreign) websites and apps assume that I’d like to see their content in Finnish. I’m fluent in Finnish, so I don’t really mind, but my wife very much minds. We’re both a part of the Swedish-speaking minority in Finland, but the difference is that I’m fluent in Finnish whereas my wife is from a region where hardly anyone speaks Finnish, so this means that a lot of websites show their content to her in a language that she doesn’t understand very well.

                    Finnish websites (at least official ones) generally have clear way of changing the language to Swedish (or at least English), but plenty of (again, foreign) sites hide the choice in a menu somewhere. I don’t know what the best solution is. Some sites give you the choice of language before doing anything else, which seems pretty good to me.

                    1. 4

                      punkt phones may be an option.

                      1. 4

                        Why would you build one of those on top of AOSP?

                        1. 2

                          Because there is no alternative; the baseband based dumbphone OSes went away in LTE, so now pretty much everything that’s a dumbphone, let alone a featurephone, is running Android.

                          1. 1

                            Well, that’s just sad.

                        2. 3

                          I have one of these too, and while the hardware is really nice to hold and use, the software has been incredibly buggy. (not to mention that you really have to consider whether nothing but phone calls and texting are enough for you) There was a recent software update that purports to have fixed most issues, but I haven’t had a chance to really put it through its paces yet.

                          1. 6

                            It’s silly that this is using Android, and has 4G, since it seems to only to phone/sms.

                            1. 3

                              This.

                              It seems interesting at first glance, and it looks like they nailed the desire for minimality. Then you look at what’s below minimality and you find it’s not minimal at all :)

                              1. 3

                                Having 4G is probably good to be future-proof. Taiwan for example has sunset GSM in 2018 and in 2019 UMTS was completely turned off, with LTE the only remaining option. Other countries are following suit over time.

                                1. 3

                                  It’s also for the tethering. If you want to be intentional about internet usage, what better than having to get out a purpose built device?

                                2. 1

                                  IIRC the MP02 didn’t support group texting when it launched, but they said they might support it with a future software update. Does it support group texting now?

                                  1. 1

                                    I can’t say, I’ve never tried group texting. Sorry.

                                3. 2

                                  It’d be perfect if it came with a QWERTY keyboard (and shipped to India).

                                1. 7

                                  What about a KaiOS based phone like the Nokia 8810?

                                  1. 4
                                    1. 3
                                    2. 3

                                      This is also interesting, and Gerda too. Do you own one? If so, how does it feel like?

                                      1. 5

                                        I own a Nokia 8810, and I can’t really recommend it from a hardware perspective. My fingers aren’t very big, but I still have trouble hitting the keys accurately. Not to mention that KaiOS is really slow (at least on this particular Nokia), and has issues with doubling keypresses when writing.

                                        I haven’t tried Gerda myself, but considering the amount of pre-installed applications and games that cannot be uninstalled, I’d likely recommend it.

                                        Nokia has some newer KaiOS phones available that seem much better from a hardware usability perspective, like this flip phone and a “tough” phone.

                                        1. 3

                                          a “tough” phone.

                                          Pre-loaded Facebook and WhatsApp

                                          ffs. pretty sure anyone who cares about privacy won’t want to be in the same room as that.

                                          1. 1

                                            anyone who cares about privacy won’t want to be in the same room as that.

                                            True, but it’s also true that you’re not forced to configure run those applications or even run them.

                                            I like the idea of having tethering available: it is definitely useful to be able to connect with a device you trust more (e.g. linux laptop) for anything more complex than sending an sms.

                                            1. 1

                                              I got try out the new Nokia 8110 recently, and obviously it’s just as cool (from a purely superficial perspective) as ever. Like craftyguy mentioned, it’s loaded with Facebook and Whatsapp. While I don’t care for Facebook, I put up with Whatsapp because of its ubiquity (I’d rather not, but there we go).

                                              It’s not perfect, but at the moment I’d say KaiOS is as close as you’re going to get to a simple phone with “necessities”.

                                            2. 1

                                              People should be able to choose to use services like those with minimally invasive clients.

                                              After all, privacy (and security) means retaining control on what personal data we give and to whom.

                                      1. 1

                                        The portability of this really sold me: I actually bought Analogue’s Super Nt (the Ghostly limited edition collab) last year, but hardly use it because I also put together a Raspberry Pi based retro game console emulator that plays SNES games and many other systems as well, which rendered the Super Nt pretty useless (other than the fact that it’s pretty and plays original cartridges). The Pocket isn’t easily replicable with an RPi, though — can’t exactly slip a Pi in your pocket.

                                        1. 2

                                          It’s a bit DIY but you can put a Pi Zero into a GameBoy shell and it works really well.

                                          https://www.sudomod.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

                                          That site in general has really good forums and a marketplace where people sell custom parts.

                                          1. 2

                                            There’s also the ClockworkPi GameShell: https://www.clockworkpi.com/gameshell

                                            Not a Raspberry Pi, but similar.

                                          2. 1

                                            Is the Nt’s emulation not better, or not better enough, than the RetroPie, then? (assuming you’ve modded your Nt to load ROMs for comparison)

                                            1. 2

                                              Yeah, I haven’t found that the Super Nt’s emulation is appreciably better than RetroPie’s — although I may not have exotic enough use cases (e.g. cartridges with SNES enhancement chips… Although some quick Googling implied that Retropie supports most of them well enough).

                                          1. 2

                                            I’m super excited about this, but: why in the world is this using a 615 ppi display?

                                            1. 4

                                              Likely because it already exists, google VS035ZSM-NH0-69P0 . Looks like it supports 120fps and is used in some leap motion AR kit project: https://developer.leapmotion.com/northstar https://www.reddit.com/r/leapmotion/comments/8p2joi/bulk_order_north_star_displays_as_a_group_canada/

                                              Could enable some display optimizations reminiscent of https://johanneskopf.de/publications/pixelart/paper/pixel.pdf (2011)

                                              1. 3

                                                My initial reaction, as someone who’s bought a ton of emulation-based handhelds with like 320x240 displays, was that it’ll probably make scaling all the various device display aspect ratios and resolutions look pretty good.

                                              1. 4

                                                Curious what it would take to flash a modified version of this to an old iPhone. Could one theoretically boot a Linux kernel if the signing check was omitted?

                                                1. 4

                                                  Not sure if it’s entirely relevant to this, but I did get Android installed on my 1st gen iPhone back in the day using this: https://www.theiphonewiki.com/wiki/IDroid

                                                  1. 1

                                                    I’m guessing the keys themselves have not been released so the issue is getting anything non-apple onto the device in the first place? Also guessing, if we had the keys we could easily modify iboot, or relatively easily port core boot or whatever the cool kids are using these days and ignore signing?

                                                    1. 2

                                                      You don’t really need keys these days to boot something. You can use kloader which is basically kexec for (32-bit) iOS. It has been used for dual-booting a signed iOS installation with an unsigned one.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Wow, that’s awesome. I have an old iPhone 4 that I’d love to re-purpose in this way. Where should I start reading/researching in order to do this myself? Thanks!

                                                    2. 1

                                                      There was the OpeniBoot project – an open source reimplementation of iBoot that works on older iPhones up to iPhone 4.