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    End of holidays, so I am getting back to work.

    At home I will stop to code in Nim and take some time to learn Zig by coding a small game with SDL2 which is one of my month goal :)

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      I’ve heard of Zig, but don’t know much about it. What do you like about it?

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        Hey Johnblood,

        I am new to Zig and I am not very experienced with system programming in general so take what I say with a grain of salt.

        Even if Zig is not mature yet and far from fully documented, the language is very concise and opinionated which make it easy and straightforward to learn and understand, no magic. And I just love the syntax.

        You can also work with C librairies without wrappers: you just import your header files and it just works like it was Zig code in the first place.

        Finally, I really like Andrew’s approach and dedication, he offers us a great piece of engineering !

        Ps: Road to Zig 1.0 give you a nice overview of Zig.

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      Finishing up a static site generator in Nix for my new website and then finally getting around to writing a blog post about Emacs I’ve been thinking about for a while.

      Specifically what I’m trying to do is write a post that highlights to people that Emacs is not a text editor (though it has a text editor) and is actually a platform for implementing applications with text-based UIs. This is not to convince people to use Emacs, but to engage with it enough to understand the paradigm and maybe become interested enough to investigate how that paradigm can apply to other stuff they’re working on.

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        Your Emacs article sounds interesting. Looking forward to it.

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        I’ll try to work on my site. I want to have one, I’ve even tried many times, but it rarely got past the half-done phase. I want to change it.

        I have a million other things and priorities, personally and at work, so this might fail, again. That’s why I’m posting it, to “commit myself”, to tell myself that I actually am doing it this time.

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          Wanna elaborate on what you are using to create your website?

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            Well, I use wintersmith as mentioned. For me, this part is yet irrelevant, though. I first want to figure out what to put there, content-wise. Like, I know I want an about page and a now page.

            I also want a sort of a microblog - just for regular posts and smaller, random thoughts - and a deep-dive subsection, where I explore concepts (sorta like long-post multi-part blogs). And a photo gallery to upload some of my photos. A back-to-the-roots, own-your-data, indieweb sort of thing.

            So where do I start with all of that? How to make a “hello world, my online now lives here” appearance? How do I start adding content? When do I finally say “hey people I wrote something, take a look”? You know, not to end up like one of those blogs with 2 articles, a “hello world” and the “first in the series” that then die off.

            I think I basically want to work out my sitemap this week.

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            Are you crafting it by hand or using something like Wordpress or Hugo?

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              wintersmith. It’s similar, just JavaScript, as JavaScript is my hammer.

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            Hopefully, learn how to make pixel art and how to program. For those interested, I’m learning YAB for programming on Haiku.

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              I want to learn about programming by starting with Python. I’m not sure where to go from there. Maybe Lua.

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                Unsolicited advice from an internet stranger: once you feel comfortable writing Python, pick up a project to work on instead of going for another language.

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                  once you feel comfortable writing Python, pick up a project to work on instead of going for another language.

                  I don’t plan to jump to a different language right away. I’ve got a couple projects I want to creat with Python first

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                I remember in college a classmate was a big openSUSE advocate, so I worked in that system for a while. Felt very different from the Ubuntu world, and I almost never hear of them in general chatter. Good to see they’re still moving forward well

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                  I’ve used openSUSE extensively and think it’s an excellent distribution. It’s also one of the few high quality distributions that still has KDE as a first class citizen rather than an afterthought, with significant testing going into the KDE workspace.

                  In the past, software.opensuse.org combined with their one-click-install tool in YaST makes it easy to get modern or uncommon software installed.

                  I think one of the reasons openSUSE doesn’t get featured a lot is because they are the smaller player in the enterprise field (compared to Red Hat) and are eclipsed by Ubuntu in the hobbyist / personal use space.

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                    I have it good authority from a consultancy gig that it’s big in Germany, especially in enterprise.

                    I was also told this is, at least in part, because of very long support times for old releases. Which is fine for enterprise, but can lead to interesting situations when upgrades would be in order.

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                    I have used opensuse on a pet server for a while. Zypper package manager was very convinient in terms of insight into security updates necessary, reboots necessary upfront before the update. I changed to CentOS later on because the hosting only supported that, and it felt backwards. (I have been a longtime redhat/fedora user)

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                      Personally, I’ve never been able to get into OpenSUSE.

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                      Urgh, what a horrible page. @johnblood this page is a clusterfuck, hope your ad revenue is nice.

                      I’m not convinced, the cost of the extension boards is insanely high given what the cost would be to just shove it all on one board and that two of them don’t have active components - you need to purchase the actual e.g. WNIC or SFP module on top, not to mention antennas for wifi

                      With the super professionally produced video makes it seem even more like crowdfunding fodder to make a buck.

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                        cz.nic appears to be a non-profit; I’m not familiar with Czech law, but section 46 of their statutes prohibit disbursements to their member base, and it’s an association of legal entities, not a share-based structure. The statutes: https://www.nic.cz/files/nic/doc/Stanovy__20170701_AJ.pdf

                        So, no “making a buck”; I believe that the people involved are all salaried. cz.nic have been doing good solid open source software work for many years. It honestly looked to me like a fun video put together in the spirit of crowd-funding, relying upon “humor” and editing away anyone going “uhm” or “er”.

                        I backed the Turris Omnia and am Very Happy with the resulting product, as it’s by far the best home router I’ve owned. It’s things like “actually pushes out software updates with security fixes, in good time” which help keep it that way. So I backed the Mox too, for more ad-hoc use.

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                          Thank you for your kind words.

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                          I never really understood the sabayon distribution, its Gentoo for people that can’t install it, or don’t want to spend the time to. For the people that just want to save time, that’s great, but usually Gentoo users, don’t want anything but the bare essentials there use flags have pulled in on there chosen packages. As an ex Gentoo user (probably around 2006-2008) I remember the forums and irc channels just being packed with sabayon users who had installed it, then running into to problems when emerging something else.

                          I can’t applaud the installer enough as I remember it used to be very easy/efficient to use, however as an ex portage user I didn’t personally enjoy entropy. I would have thought it would have been better to just maintain a Gentoo installer and entropy package separately. I remember back in 2006(ish) Gentoo released a live CD installer (which was awful) and then Sabayon came out with one (I think either just before or just after) that worked perfectly.

                          Anyway, it’s great to see this project is still around and doing well.

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                            It seems like a cop-out because the whole point of Gentoo is building the package to fit your system. Sabayon has a number of precompiled packages. Seems to defeat the purpose.

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                              There are people who would like to use perks that emerge/layman gives them (first class access to application’s source code, build process, etc), or would like to learn Gentoo, but don’t have knowledge or will to install it properly. I’ve used Gentoo in times of Penium4’s and I liked it very much, but the duration of revdep-rebuild was simply horrible, updating Firefox or OpenOffice was something that needed to be scheduled over night. So I understand that some people would like to have a system that’s prepared for them, and use Gentoo’s tools for the customization of software they are interested in customizing.

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                            I’m still betting that this will happen gradually. It makes sense to start with the smaller laptops which are already being beaten by Apple’s current ARM chips.

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                              I agree. Most ARM CPUs are not up to the challenge. The new MacBook has ARM chips, but they run the Touch Bar and a couple other functions. Not the main processor.

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                                My money is on a scaled up ARM for a super-light notebook, followed by requirements that developers start shipping LLVM bitstreams instead of fat binaries. Once that settles down it’ll go into all portables and probably a compute-add-on (or MB-only replacement model) for the 2019 Mac Pro.

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                                this can’t be the real reason. Would you rather compile for x86 and arm, or would you like to build an entire new architecture and the compile to that new architecture. The cost difference is wild. Obviously they either have something else in mind or they have more dollars than sense.

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                                  Considering how much money they make every time a “new” iPhone gets released, the “more dollars than sense” part would not surprise me.