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    I’m going to be working on a weekly newsletter showcasing computer ads from days gone by. I also have to work on an article about this history of Unix from v1 to the creation of BSD.

    For those interested, over the weekend I published the second entry in my newsletter about cool historical tidbits: https://historicaltidbits.substack.com/p/britains-frozen-aircraft-carrier.

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      I’m going to be working on a weekly newsletter showcasing computer ads from days gone by.

      This sounds very cool!

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      When I tried it a few years ago, I was really impressed with how Twine made creating stories intuitive and accessible. It’s up there with Hypercard in its potential to allow non-coders to express themselves thru programming. Highly recommended.

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        Same here.

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        Very cool. I’ll have to take a look.

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          For some reason, it was renamed to Antimony since this link was posted.

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            Been using it for a couple of years. Good application

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              Coincidentally, just like @acdw, I recently wrote the most bare-bones of static site generators, in POSIX sh; it’s in this gitea repo. I’m using it now to render static pages for my tilde.team webspace.

              It’s barely more than a wrapper around cmark (the CommonMark reference implementation) right now, but it was good practice with sh nonetheless. It also gave me an reason to learn some basic sed and awk. I’d never touched those before, and I think I understand what makes them useful better now.

              I haven’t touched it for a while, but I hope to go back to it some time not so far in the future and touch it up. Maybe one day it’ll be a full static site generator! Will it still be written in sh? Who knows! (But perhaps for my own sanity I should change languages before I make it bigger…)

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                It’s good to see a fellow member of tilde.team in the wild. :)

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                These tips helped me quite a bit.

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                  Crazy seeing something I wrote posted here, I’m glad you got some use from that post.

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                    Before I found this, FreeBSD crashed every time I used the fn keys. Your tips fixed that. Thanks.

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                  Working on a game for a game jam

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                    It’s the week of the Lisp Game Jam!

                    Working with a friend to write a retro cyberpunk heist game in Fennel using the TIC-80 platform: https://git.sr.ht/~technomancy/spilljackers

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                      Could you explain what you like about Lisp? I’m still exploring programming. I do have a book on Racket that I got via the Humble Bundle.

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                      I’m going to work on converting a game to a different engine. A couple of months ago, I was trying to make a game in PowerPoint for a game jam and it was not working the way I wanted it to. So, now I’m going to recreate it with Ren’Py.

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                        I’m currently writing a review of PCLinuxOS for It’s Foss. I hope to finish it tonight. I’m also working on an interactive fiction game for a game jam on itch.io.

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                          Based on the name, I thought this was a Visual Basic-like version of D. Darn.

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                            I think I’ll take another stab at learning how to program.

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                              Nice, what are you learning? Is there something specific you would like to build?

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                                I bought a couple of books about Ruby, mainly because the syntax makes sense to me. I’ll also give Python another look (have tons of ebooks about it). I want to create cross-platform apps, so I can contribute to the FOSS world. I’m not a fan of Electron and the NPM mess, so no Javascript for me. :)

                                In the past, when I tried to start learning to program, I saw something about another language and would go “That looks cool, let me check that out.” It’s hard to know what is the best language to learn.

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                                  Oh yeah, that’s such a classic problem, I’ve fought with this type of indecision for years. Honestly, either Ruby or Python are going to be great for you, and JavaScript would be fine too! But it’s important to just stick with one for now and build whatever is satisfying to you.

                                  I wish you luck and joy with it, programming is sometimes frustrating, but in the end very rewarding!

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                              End of holidays, so I am getting back to work.

                              At home I will stop to code in Nim and take some time to learn Zig by coding a small game with SDL2 which is one of my month goal :)

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                                I’ve heard of Zig, but don’t know much about it. What do you like about it?

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                                  Hey Johnblood,

                                  I am new to Zig and I am not very experienced with system programming in general so take what I say with a grain of salt.

                                  Even if Zig is not mature yet and far from fully documented, the language is very concise and opinionated which make it easy and straightforward to learn and understand, no magic. And I just love the syntax.

                                  You can also work with C librairies without wrappers: you just import your header files and it just works like it was Zig code in the first place.

                                  Finally, I really like Andrew’s approach and dedication, he offers us a great piece of engineering !

                                  Ps: Road to Zig 1.0 give you a nice overview of Zig.

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                                Finishing up a static site generator in Nix for my new website and then finally getting around to writing a blog post about Emacs I’ve been thinking about for a while.

                                Specifically what I’m trying to do is write a post that highlights to people that Emacs is not a text editor (though it has a text editor) and is actually a platform for implementing applications with text-based UIs. This is not to convince people to use Emacs, but to engage with it enough to understand the paradigm and maybe become interested enough to investigate how that paradigm can apply to other stuff they’re working on.

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                                  Your Emacs article sounds interesting. Looking forward to it.

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                                  I’ll try to work on my site. I want to have one, I’ve even tried many times, but it rarely got past the half-done phase. I want to change it.

                                  I have a million other things and priorities, personally and at work, so this might fail, again. That’s why I’m posting it, to “commit myself”, to tell myself that I actually am doing it this time.

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                                    Wanna elaborate on what you are using to create your website?

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                                      Well, I use wintersmith as mentioned. For me, this part is yet irrelevant, though. I first want to figure out what to put there, content-wise. Like, I know I want an about page and a now page.

                                      I also want a sort of a microblog - just for regular posts and smaller, random thoughts - and a deep-dive subsection, where I explore concepts (sorta like long-post multi-part blogs). And a photo gallery to upload some of my photos. A back-to-the-roots, own-your-data, indieweb sort of thing.

                                      So where do I start with all of that? How to make a “hello world, my online now lives here” appearance? How do I start adding content? When do I finally say “hey people I wrote something, take a look”? You know, not to end up like one of those blogs with 2 articles, a “hello world” and the “first in the series” that then die off.

                                      I think I basically want to work out my sitemap this week.

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                                      Are you crafting it by hand or using something like Wordpress or Hugo?

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                                        wintersmith. It’s similar, just JavaScript, as JavaScript is my hammer.

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                                      Hopefully, learn how to make pixel art and how to program. For those interested, I’m learning YAB for programming on Haiku.

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                                        I want to learn about programming by starting with Python. I’m not sure where to go from there. Maybe Lua.

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                                          Unsolicited advice from an internet stranger: once you feel comfortable writing Python, pick up a project to work on instead of going for another language.

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                                            once you feel comfortable writing Python, pick up a project to work on instead of going for another language.

                                            I don’t plan to jump to a different language right away. I’ve got a couple projects I want to creat with Python first

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                                          I remember in college a classmate was a big openSUSE advocate, so I worked in that system for a while. Felt very different from the Ubuntu world, and I almost never hear of them in general chatter. Good to see they’re still moving forward well

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                                            I’ve used openSUSE extensively and think it’s an excellent distribution. It’s also one of the few high quality distributions that still has KDE as a first class citizen rather than an afterthought, with significant testing going into the KDE workspace.

                                            In the past, software.opensuse.org combined with their one-click-install tool in YaST makes it easy to get modern or uncommon software installed.

                                            I think one of the reasons openSUSE doesn’t get featured a lot is because they are the smaller player in the enterprise field (compared to Red Hat) and are eclipsed by Ubuntu in the hobbyist / personal use space.

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                                              I have it good authority from a consultancy gig that it’s big in Germany, especially in enterprise.

                                              I was also told this is, at least in part, because of very long support times for old releases. Which is fine for enterprise, but can lead to interesting situations when upgrades would be in order.

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                                              I have used opensuse on a pet server for a while. Zypper package manager was very convinient in terms of insight into security updates necessary, reboots necessary upfront before the update. I changed to CentOS later on because the hosting only supported that, and it felt backwards. (I have been a longtime redhat/fedora user)

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                                                Personally, I’ve never been able to get into OpenSUSE.

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                                                Urgh, what a horrible page. @johnblood this page is a clusterfuck, hope your ad revenue is nice.

                                                I’m not convinced, the cost of the extension boards is insanely high given what the cost would be to just shove it all on one board and that two of them don’t have active components - you need to purchase the actual e.g. WNIC or SFP module on top, not to mention antennas for wifi

                                                With the super professionally produced video makes it seem even more like crowdfunding fodder to make a buck.

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                                                  cz.nic appears to be a non-profit; I’m not familiar with Czech law, but section 46 of their statutes prohibit disbursements to their member base, and it’s an association of legal entities, not a share-based structure. The statutes: https://www.nic.cz/files/nic/doc/Stanovy__20170701_AJ.pdf

                                                  So, no “making a buck”; I believe that the people involved are all salaried. cz.nic have been doing good solid open source software work for many years. It honestly looked to me like a fun video put together in the spirit of crowd-funding, relying upon “humor” and editing away anyone going “uhm” or “er”.

                                                  I backed the Turris Omnia and am Very Happy with the resulting product, as it’s by far the best home router I’ve owned. It’s things like “actually pushes out software updates with security fixes, in good time” which help keep it that way. So I backed the Mox too, for more ad-hoc use.

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                                                    Thank you for your kind words.