1. 2

    It’d be interesting to see Dragonfly BSD’s results.

    As Dragonfly forked freebsd and diverged mainly on the issue of how to do SMP.

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      According to the article, Dragonfly didn’t even successfully boot.

      1. 2

        Too bad. It means we’ll have to wait further to see results.

        As far as I am aware Matt favors Ryzen/TR CPUs and has done a lot of enablement work, so I’d be optimistic.

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      This sounds interesting. I wonder if the talks will be recorded and published?

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        We should have recordings.

        1. 6

          Talks will be recorded, and posted on the site

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            read the announcement twice, and missed that. sorry.

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          Press release, flagged.

          1. 1

            Since when are announcement articles for new products/companies/software not allowed? I love how this community has gone from something amazing jcs@ created to a complete comment and flagging shit show over the years!

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              Sorry you feel that way.

              Unfortunately, since the site’s founding a lot has happened in growth hacking techniques and norms. Given the slow pace of the Lobsters frontpage as well as the valuable eyeballs we currently attract, we would be extremely naïve to encourage indiscriminate posting of low-content press releases here lest we get overrun as has happened to other sites.

              This is somebody talking about moving out of their garage, and then plugging a careers page. The person who wrote it–or who wrote the other article that @gerikson mentions–didn’t submit it here, so it isn’t even really an invitation for discussion. Like, a show thing from @bcantrill would be slightly different.

              1. 1

                Think it depends a little. Because I’ve loosely followed that the people involved have been doing over the years this is interesting to me, because I have benefited from their work in the past.

                If I didn’t know who the people were, I’d probably not be interested. But I wouldn’t flag it, just ignore it.

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              I don’t like the name. How about “Beginner’s All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code”?

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                This language is similar to BASIC and has many features of it, but also many differences. And I like BASIC.

                1. 2

                  Please, elaborate on the differences.

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                    Arrays have square brackets and start at 0, no GOTOs, blocks end with “end” or with a dot. Variables are integers by default. Functions work differently …

                    There is the Python-like “for range”, which fits better to 0-based arrays. The syntax is generally shorter.

                2. 0

                  Clearly since you don’t like the name the author should change it!

                  1. 6

                    Clearly convincing the author to change the name wasn’t my intention. Maybe you didn’t get it, the OP did.

                1. 9

                  Wow another “world’s” something or other Docker build…

                  1. 1

                    This is great, would love to see some code once you consider things ready for a wider audience. I’d be curious to know if this is written in Lua or Go considering your recent rewrite everything in Go post.

                    1. 1

                      It’s in go.

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                      Summary: Nick Cameron is a research engineer at Mozilla working on Rust: tools, the language, and compiler. He is leaving Mozilla - the article makes it sound like he has another opportunity that he is going to pursue. Steve Klabnik has also left the Rust team recently, though it sounds like this was for different reasons.

                        1. 3

                          I’ll also get a chance to use Rust ‘in real life’. It’s hard to describe why that is a big deal for me; I’ve been programming in Rust pretty much daily for the last five years and writing real programs (and some pretty damn interesting ones too). But it feels cool to use it ‘on the outside’ after being ‘on the inside’ for so long. Especially in a project which is well-suited and committed to Rust.

                          It makes me smile to know that even Rust core team members are excited to have an opportunity to use Rust in production :)

                      1. 3

                        What no pictures!

                        1. 7

                          I’ll add some shortly :D

                          Edit: Added some pictures!

                          1. 2

                            I like the the built-in camera cover, very nice feature (and laptop.)

                        1. 1

                          What wifi USB dongle is that? Also, what chipset does it use?

                          I currently use an Intel NUC for my desktop and almost nothing except Ubuntu carries drivers for the wifi in the installation media. I’d also like to GNU Guix which doesn’t include Intel wireless drivers at all.

                          1. 2

                            He mentions the chipset lower in the article. It’s a RTL8188CUS.

                            1. 1

                              Yep, as jturner said, sorry if it wasn’t obvious.

                          1. 1

                            Serious question: As someone whose never used ed but uses vim on a daily basis, is it worth learning ed? I’m not a regex master by any means but I feel like I grok them enough that I wouldn’t want to learn ed as a way to get better at regexes (emphasized in the description).

                            1. 1

                              No, I don’t think learning ed will make you better at regexes. For me it’s helpful to know if you ever find yourself in an environment where you don’t have access to other tools like vi. Ie, the OpenBSD install media or possible single user mode on some gnu/linux distro.

                            1. 1

                              Just bought my copy!

                              1. 4

                                No, but I’d like to have a working CLI mail client, even just to check and mark as read.

                                I use multiple accounts (university and Gmail), how do neomutt works with this kind of workload?

                                Do I have to setup a MTA?

                                Since most email are (sadly) html, how could I read these?

                                1. 2

                                  I normally use Mutt with multiple accounts. There are several ways you can set that up, and a lot of them are decently documented. I use something very similar to this.

                                  It’s not necessary to run your own MTA; I use Mutt’s built-in SMTP support with multiple GMail accounts with no issues.

                                  Most of the people and services I communicate with send a plaintext version of the email alongside the HTML version, so I have a lot less HTML trouble than expected. However, for HTML-only email, the best option I could find is to save the HTML file to the disk and use a web browser to read it. It should be fairly easy to create a macro for that in Mutt.

                                  1. 4

                                    I have a .mailcap file setup with the below. It does a pretty good job letting me view what I need from HTML emails. text/html; lynx -dump %s; copiousoutput; nametemplate=%s.html

                                    1. 1

                                      Thank you for your the inputs, I’ll check out (neo) mutt as soon as possible.

                                  1. 1

                                    $39 is a com­pletely fair price for your new knowl­edge, and com­pa­ra­ble to what you’d pay for a printed book.

                                    Any plans on having a printed book for sale? I’d be willing to this if I got a hardbound brick to sit on my desk.

                                    1. 1

                                      Check out the “About the Author” page.

                                      Do you plan to release this book as a paper­back? No.

                                    1. 9

                                      I hope some openbsd folks give myrddin a serious try. It basically has the same model as C, except you get bounds checking and pattern matching. I think it is a great lightweight language with good security characteristics.

                                      It will work well with pledge for example. One issue I can see is it doesn’t use the system memory allocator, or have proper ASLR support (yet). But there is lots of potential.

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                                        I’ll get behind that statement. I’ve given myrddin a try and like what I’ve seen. Once a stable version has been released I’d like to get it added to our ports tree.

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                                        You can also view this from the OpenSMTPD domain.

                                        1. 2

                                          How does one configure it? Does resolv.conf point to rebound or to rebound’s forward server(s)?

                                          1. 4

                                            Somewhat undecided. Right now it just reads an IP address out of rebound.conf but if rebound becomes “the resolver” then perhaps it will read resolv.conf instead.

                                            1. 2

                                              In /etc/rebound.conf: 8.8.8.8

                                              In /etc/resolv.conf: 127.0.0.1

                                            1. 1

                                              Finally something reasonable!

                                              Are there plans to push this into base along with libsodium? Or just as a port/package?

                                              1. 1

                                                It’s just something I wanted to do. There was a kind of pressure to make signify into more than it is; now it doesn’t need to be.

                                                1. 2

                                                  If you put up a release archive somewhere I’ll make a port for it.

                                              1. 1

                                                Cool! I’ve been using preev.com for a while now. Any advantages this has over that?

                                                1. 3

                                                  If simplicity is an advantage then it has that. Preev has more features like converting to different currencies and from different BTC amounts.

                                                1. 3

                                                  Free Mavericks upgrade… I was not expecting that.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    All the way from Snow Leopard too.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      If Microsoft releases Windows 9 for free, do you think Apple will pay people to upgrade to the next OS X? :)

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Giving old hardware a free software upgrade that enables it to run newer apps is a nice way of proving to the user how slow their old hardware is, as evidenced by older iPhones getting new iOS and people complaining about how laggy it is.

                                                        It is kind of strange that desktop OS upgrades are expected to cost money but mobile phone and tablet OS upgrades are expected to be free.