1. 2

    Love the big ASCII graphics!

    1. 4

      Really does feel more personal. Maybe that has to do with why the format is also so difficult to quickly grok and faded out of use: each message takes up much of your screen and really gets your attention. You look at the person and their signature and their location and avatar and wow going to be sad to see this go:)

      1. 2

        First off, beautiful site. Love how the gradient continues through the items!

        Some quick comments about the wishes, which all seem pretty sensible:

        • the :attribute(partial-name-*) request is pretty completely covered both by [attr*=value] that matches attributes containing value and other related selectors like [attr|=value] (see MDN docs) EDIT: I cede this point to innovati!
        • :parent is covered by :has, but has not been implemented in any browsers…probably because of the potentially enormous performance hits.
        1. 3

          You can match attribute values as strings, but not attribute names themselves. Suppose you have <div data-example1> and <div data-example2>, how can you write a selector that will select both data attributes data-example1 and data-example2, without listing out all possibilities like [data-example1], [data-example2], etc…

          Consider these examples:

          But this isn’t something CSS is capable of doing presently.

          Also, I think the difference between selecting an element’s direct parent (like parentNode in JavaScript) is a lot simpler than finding the nearest ancestor matching a selector to another element (like closest() in JavaScript), or like selecting all parents of an element that match a CSS selector (like :has() if it existed)

          1. 2

            Love how the gradient continues through the items!

            While cool, that effect doesn’t seem to work if I block javascript from cdnjs.cloudflare.com so I’m assuming it’s not pure CSS.

            1. 2

              Indeed not - it’s using EQCSS via JS to style elements using the knowledge of their index within the total number of tags like it in the document:

              @element code {
                $this {
                  background: hsl(eval("([].indexOf.call(document.querySelectorAll('code'), $it) * 5) + 150"), 100%, 90%);
                }
              }
              

              This means that each <code> tag gets an HSL() value for its background that uses [].indexOf.call(document.querySelectorAll('code'), $it) * 5) in JavaScript to get the current index of that <code> tag :D

          1. 10

            I can think of one good reason: the background app screen/tiles/whatever gets unusably cluttered if you leave everything “open”.

            And I can think of one good UX WTF: if there’s no reason to do it, why does the option exist? Users will do everything you enable them to, so if you put a big footgun in the interface (and IIRC, the interface to close background apps on iOS is assigned to literally the only hardware button on the device), it’s on you when users shoot themselves in the foot.

            1. 16

              And I can think of one good UX WTF: if there’s no reason to do it, why does the option exist?

              There’s still a good amount of cases where the user can detect errors the operating system can’t, such as the app being logically stuck.

              1. 6

                So then in some cases you should force quit apps on iOS. ;)

                As with many things, the option probably should exist; however, in this case, the footgun is large and only a button-press away. (I’ve had poorly-interpreted swipes in the background app screen/tiles/whatever close things I didn’t intend to close.) Keep your footguns small and preferably locked up in a cabinet where they can be accessed if needed and not before, and you’ll minimize the number of traumatic foot injuries users of your interface end up with.

                1. 3

                  To your first point (or maybe I’m misinterpreting it! Emoticons are tricky.)

                  As Fraser mentions, yes, there are exceptional situations where an app with background privileges can get stuck, and you need to kill that app. The argument here is not that you should never have to kill any app using the multitasking switcher — the argument is that you don’t need to do it on a regular basis, and you’re not making anything “better” by clearing the list. Shame on the “geniuses” who are peddling this advice.

            1. 2

              I’m sad that we are still building new OSes with C. :-(

              1. 7

                If it makes you feel better, half the kernel is in C++?

                https://github.com/fuchsia-mirror/magenta

                1. 14

                  Now that makes me sad.

                  1. 2

                    Also theres some Rust in there (specifically xi-editor, the editing backend for all UI). I don’t think it is in the kernel though. Could be wrong.

                  2. 6

                    Why?

                    1. 3

                      About a billion security problems over the last two decades.

                      1. 2

                        Sorry, not taking the bait. Nice try. :-)

                    2. 3

                      My understanding from an article I read awhile ago is that a lot of the lower-level code will be Go.

                      1. 3

                        The network stack is in go. Rust support is getting there.

                      2. 2

                        What’s the alternative?

                        1. 1

                          I didn’t say I had an alternative. I’m sad it’s still the only viable choice.

                      1. 8

                        I love these composite “operators” in the C world, another one is the “goes to” operator:

                        while(i --> 0) {
                        // stuff
                        }
                        
                        1. 6
                          1. 1

                            What?? That is a joke, right?

                            1. 3

                              At the cost of ruining it:

                              https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/oldnewthing/20150526-00/?p=45034/

                              Last time, I introduced the tadpole operators. As you have probably figured out by now, it was a joke. There are no new tadpole operators. […] The tadpole operators are pseudo-operators, like the goes to operator or the sproing operator: They take advantage of existing language features, and come with a creative story.

                              1. 1

                                Ah, thanks for the explanation :P

                          2. 1

                            Actually, according to this kind of a joke post, it should be:

                            int i=10;
                            while( i -> 0 ) {
                               // stuff
                            }
                            

                            Note the single -.

                          1. 5

                            The beauty of the Underhanded C contest is that a problem that is seemingly so simple is turned into something malicious. See last year’s prompt:

                            Your goal is to write the function that compares a test measurement to a reference pattern:

                            int match( double * test, double * reference, int bins, double threshold )
                            

                            …where test and reference are 1-dimensional arrays of width bins, that encode a gamma ray spectrum of a test warhead and a reference warhead, respectively. Your detector should output a 1 (“yes”) if these two arrays are sufficiently similar, and 0 (“no”) otherwise; you should use the parameter threshold to adjust the sensitivity of the match.

                            You are free to use any formula to decide if test[] and reference[] are a close match, as long as it is justifiably accurate: i.e., that two very similar signals match for a reasonable threshold, and two clearly distinguishable signals fail to match for some threshold. You will get more points for using a common comparison formula or detector structure; something weird and ad-hoc may be suspicious and hard to justify.

                            The Underhanded Rust Contest’s prompt to create a web server that supports (“at least!”) creating accounts and handling payments, by comparison, is enormous. This is not to say the contest has no worth (I’m really excited to see the responses), but it may reach different goals than a contest with shorter solutions would.

                            1. 3

                              /u/Manishearth replied to my comment on reddit, reproduced here:

                              We were afraid that it might be too hard to write underhanded Rust code for something that tiny – most of the tricks used in underhanded C don’t work in Rust). If it turns out that this is too easy we will change the scope next year.

                              (Additionally, it’s not actually that complicated. Account creation and submitting payments are mostly simple operations. Robust implementations with email verification &c are harder, but that’s not what we’re looking for)

                              Makes a lot of sense.

                            1. 37

                              I feel this opinion won’t be popular but… this reads like another case of bias confirmation after as little as trying to pay more attention to one’s own code. I’d like some data for a change, not “I felt that I understood my code better”. Otherwise it’s the same feeling you get about your computer being faster after you wiped the dirty screen after a while.

                              1. 6

                                I think the article is right in asking people to try for themselves. I’ve used Acme for a couple months as my text editor at my workplace. This gave me the opportunity to use it for proper work while keeping Sublime Text at home for hobby projects. While I loved Acme’s particularities (tiling, mouse chords, unix terminal with plan9 utils.. on windows!) I loathed the lack of syntax highlight.

                                I didn’t really feel different with my code after taking aways colors, but I noticed both while and after not having it that I was making a lot of mistakes that syntax highlighting would have prevented (unmatched quotes, wrong braces).

                                In the end I went back to Sublime, however I’m trying to fill the gap left from Acme with some plugins for tiling and plumbing.

                                On the other end, I’m so dependant on my tools now that I’m used to not indent Go code on purpose because I use “gofmt-on-save” as a linter. (if it doesn’t indent it, it’s broken)

                                1. 2

                                  Good point with the indenting. Apart from coloring, that’s the other thing that tells me the parser and I disagree on what I wrote.

                                2. 3

                                  The strongest argument I have is that highlighting English actively makes it more difficult to read. Perhaps this is because we’re used to reading prose without highlighting, but even “lightly highlighted” text like this Sherlock Holmes story is infuriating (scroll down halfway to see some quoted strings).

                                  1. 22

                                    I made this comment on lobste.rs last time highlighted prose was used as an example:

                                    Not a big fan of that image of real lit using syntax highlighting. In programming, we use tons of repeated elements like braces, colons and keywords like for, while, if, import, and hundreds of others, depending on the language. Each if statement will use the exact same keywords. Syntax highlighting can help show us what words really matter and which ones are just syntactical filling inherent with the language. In a novel, each verb conveys vastly different meaning and needs to be read in depth.

                                    1. 3

                                      I made a long comment, in that same thread.

                                      I no longer stand by it. I think it was unnecessarily divisive, and all my complaints came down to “there are no themes I like”. The solution to that is to make one, not to complain about it. And I have found that I do find coloring very useful to add visual texture to code, so that I don’t lose my place in it as easily.

                                      1. 2

                                        I tried it and I think there’s something to it. I recommend everyone just try it for a few days.

                                      2. 9

                                        I think that comparing the effectiveness of highlighting for spoken languages and highlighting for programming languages is comparing apples to oranges. We don’t read code the same way we read English.

                                        A better parallel, in my opinion, would be syntax highlighting for a complex mathematical equation, in which case I think you would find it would make it much easier to understand and read.

                                        1. 2

                                          I think using different colors for different variables might be useful with mathematical equations, but I doubt it would help to color variables one color, operations another color, functions a third color, etc., as we do today with code.

                                          1. 2

                                            Crockford suggested a syntax highlighting where each scope was its own color.

                                            1. 2

                                              I’ve seen a lot of structural editors for Lisp do things like this over the years. I don’t go that far, but I do highlight parens depending on nesting level, and it can be very helpful.

                                              1. 1

                                                I actually use a vscode extension that adds this called “indent-rainbow”

                                            2. 2

                                              In college I used a four color pen. I soooo used syntax highlighting as a way of keeping context like this on paper for many many mathematical constructs - matrices, graphs, equations, what have you. I even have a syntax highlighted regex set on paper filed somewhere in my room still.

                                            3. 3

                                              Sure but in programming the grammar is a part of the meaning. In english the grammar is usually not relevant.

                                              Edit: Amusingly the highlighted english was much easier for me to read. I have ADHD and often lose my place, and the color helped me keep track of which word I was on.

                                              1. 2

                                                I legitimately think highlighting English makes it easier to read. You can easily pick out the subjects, objects and verbs easily and I think if someone was learning English the highlighting would be very helpful.

                                                1. 1

                                                  You know we actually do use ‘syntax highlighting’ in english in the form of underline, italics etc.

                                                  It’s just that this particular application of highlighting is awful, since it’s a transplant from code highlighting.

                                                2. 2

                                                  I don’t know about you, but I always feel like my computer is faster after I download some more RAM.

                                                  1. 11

                                                    Story time!

                                                    I was a kid, and I thought I knew stuff about computers. So when Connectix came out with this product called “RAM Doubler”, I giggled. What snake oil! But then we got a copy and lo and behold, I could run more programs than I had memory for! I was totally astounded.

                                                    Years later, having long forgotten about this, I was in my operating systems class, and I learned about virtual memory. It all snapped into place: RAM Doubler was a kernel extension that implemented virtual memory, which Mac OS didn’t support back in those days.

                                                    More details: http://www.ambrosiasw.com/Ambrosia_Times/January_96/3.1HowTo.html

                                                    1. 6

                                                      IIRC, RAM Doubler also did memory compression in later versions. Maybe they also did black magic with the way memory management worked with contiguous blocks - the classic System had trouble with that. Their later companion product, Speed Doubler, replaced the 68k emulator on PPC Macs with a JIT, which improved performance because almost everything back then was emulated.

                                                  2. 2

                                                    Totally agreed. Basically I found myself thinking “I paid attention to my code more” is the crux of the article.

                                                  1. 16

                                                    They answer the question in the first sentence:

                                                    They do load fast, which is a terrific user experience

                                                    1. 10

                                                      Eh, that really ignores the thrust of the article. Sure, they load fast, and users like that. But the question is why do publishers feel so comfortable cedeing an enormous amount of control to Google, by allowing their content to be served directly by Google, under URLs under Google’s domain, that get shared, without anyone being sent to the publisher’s own servers?

                                                      1. 9

                                                        Another way to look at this is that publishers get free hosting and save on bandwidth costs but still get to run their ads and don’t need to pay Google a cent for this.

                                                        1. 7

                                                          Sure. But if I’m a publisher that’s a deal that I’d really be asking myself what the catch was going to be in the long term. Losing control over core parts of your business is never a good long-term play.

                                                          The fact that people are linking to and sharing to my content on not-my-branded-domain would and should make me extremely concerned about the long-term benefit of this scheme for me.

                                                          1. 7

                                                            Publishers are in a rough spot and mostly just trying to stay afloat rather than thinking about their long-term health. Same reason they have been falling over themselves to publish Facebook Instant Articles.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              No doubt. The Facebook Instant Articles are a terrible idea too.

                                                            2. 5

                                                              I’d really be asking myself what the catch was going to be in the long term.

                                                              Can you unpublish an AMP page?

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Does the domain matter? Maybe for search, but the publishers name is right there

                                                                If Google were to abuse this at all, antitrust regulators would have such a field day. And why? Google’s getting what they want out of this

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  To point at but one issue with it: lets say this goes the way of a lot of Google products, and disappears in a year or five. What happens if I were making significant revenue off of evergreen links that happened to use the AMP URL? I’m at the mercy of whatever Google decides to do (redirects? 404s?). That’s not something you want to leave up to a 3rd party when it’s your business at stake.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    If you do business on the web your revenue is already at googles whim (to a first approximation)

                                                          2. 5

                                                            And again, in the second paragraph:

                                                            I searched for “ars pixel preview.” The first search result was the AMP version of his review.

                                                            1. 5

                                                              Does Google give results boosts to pages with AMP versions available?

                                                              1. 7

                                                                Yes, they have a results carousel at the top that’s all AMP in some cases, even if you didn’t say “AMP” in the query.

                                                            2. 4

                                                              Which is true, but is AMP the only way to make a web page that loads fast?

                                                              1. 2

                                                                You can get very close by not including any 3rd party js or other sources of slow, and paying top dollar for a cdn, getting your cache headers right, etc. users already have Google DNS cached, but that’s not a huge deal

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  For small assets and moderate traffic CloudFront has been really reasonable for my blog. Typically traffic runs about ten cents a month; I don’t get much, obviously, but it’s cheaper than a VPS, doesn’t require patching, and is really fast.

                                                            1. 7

                                                              I’ve found this flowchart to be really useful: http://justinhileman.info/article/git-pretty/full/

                                                              1. 21

                                                                Unbelievably discouraging…

                                                                None of these speak to me as what Mozilla should be about. They all seem as cookie-cutter and generic and aimless as Mozilla itself has seemed for the last few years.

                                                                I added a comment to similar effect on the thread and included what principles I think should guide Mozilla and, from those principles, a relatively simple concept just as an example. I sincerely doubt anyone in the design team or executive of Mozilla will listen since the primary thrust of my comment was “let’s not rebrand till we know what we want to be about.”

                                                                But, here’s hoping Mozilla finds its footing again and continues its old work of making the web a better place…

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  Would you mind either linking to or reproducing your comments here? I’d love to hear what principles you think should the logo should evoke.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    Unfortunately, I navigated away from the page already and my comment is in the moderation queue. When the comment makes it through the queue, I will link to it here.

                                                                    Tl;dr: the three or four principles I would like to see Mozilla embrace as an organization are as follows (and none of the logos seem to really reflect these in my opinion):

                                                                    1. Freedom (Liberty)
                                                                    2. Inclusivity / Openness
                                                                    3. Community
                                                                    4. (Revolution)

                                                                    I expanded on these a little more in the post, and the very simple concept I proposed tried to mirror them as best I could (I am not a graphic designer).

                                                                    1. 19

                                                                      The eye of sauron doesn’t just scream “freedom” to you?

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Hi, fellow openness lover! Do you really believe that a change from closed society to an open one would not require a cultural revolution of sorts? Do not hesitate to use verbs when describing your values.

                                                                        “Mozilla will wield openness as a shield to protect you and your freedom.”

                                                                      2. 2

                                                                        The comment just made it through moderation, but my images did not get attached. I have posted a new comment with links inlined.

                                                                        The links are here below as well for-reference:

                                                                        https://ptpb.pw/ssJl.png

                                                                        https://ptpb.pw/mklJ.png

                                                                        https://ptpb.pw/ZP79.png

                                                                      3. 1

                                                                        None of these speak to me as what Mozilla should be about.

                                                                        Exactly, I came here for the fox rearing.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        Design Route A (The Eye) definitely looks more like some evil eye (Sauron?) than an eye that’s looking out and fighting for you. The colors are nice, though. Feeling best about Route B (The Connector) and Route C (The Open Button) at the moment.

                                                                        Or maybe it’s just the colors of C…I’ve fallen in love with that bright saturated blue recently. Some of my favorite examples:

                                                                        http://generationpress.co.uk/services/digital/

                                                                        http://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/appelle-moi-papa-french-graphic-design-130516

                                                                        https://www.behance.net/gallery/16770767/More-Than-Blue

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          I agree the blue is nice. I personally do not like it paired with the fuchsia (I think that is what it is) though.

                                                                        1. 11

                                                                          It seems this may have something to do with summer Ramadan?

                                                                          Another such place is Morocco, where the schedule for the first start of DST and last end of DST are adequately defined, but every year since 2012 there has been a “DST suspension period”, such that DST ends before the start of Ramadan, and is restored sometime after. Not only does this mean that the clocks need to be changed four times in a single calendar year, but it also means that nobody is fully certain of when the middle two transitions will occur until the government makes an announcement. Part of the reason for this is that the dates for Ramadan are based on the observed sighting of the new moon. […] (By the way, Egypt used to do this as well, but only in 2010 and 2014.)

                                                                          http://codeofmatt.com/2016/04/23/on-the-timing-of-time-zone-changes/

                                                                          Great article by the way, read the whole thing if you get the chance. Did you know Haiti this year cancelled DST with just 1 day’s notice?

                                                                          1. 29

                                                                            I feel like this would fall foul of protected classes in the US. If not, it certainly should. It’s like every imaginable question you cannot legally ask all wrapped up into one disgusting product.

                                                                            In any case, I would absolutely refuse to rent from a landlord who wanted access to my private information, even at a statistical level, especially if it passed through a third party. Credit report, references and application is all you get. But of course, I have the wealth and flexibility to shop around landlords and move if needed; many many people do not.

                                                                            1. 27

                                                                              I feel like this would fall foul of protected classes in the US. If not, it certainly should. It’s like every imaginable question you cannot legally ask all wrapped up into one disgusting product.

                                                                              Definitely. Specifically, the part about how “the service notifies your landlord of possible ‘life events,’ like marriages or pregnancies” bumps into the 1988 amendment to the Fair Housing Act that prohibits discrimination based on “familial status.”

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                “All we can do is give them the information,” Thornhill said. “It’s up to landlords to do the right thing.”

                                                                                As the article mentions, they hope to get by on the technicality that they’re not discriminating on any protected classes. And it will be pretty hard to prove that a landlord is discriminating if they don’t explicitly ask for the information but just happen to make decisions that happen to correspond to the information…

                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                Yeah if you use this service as a landlord you will get sued, and you will lose. You can’t outsource discrimination with hand-waving. If it looks like it’s super illegal, as a business you should run under the assumption that it is.

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                from states with no income tax too

                                                                                Wait, what! These exist? Does she/he (can’t find the gender of the author anywhere) mean countries?

                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                  God Bless Texas!

                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                    I know South Dakota has none. Alaska actually has a negative income tax, where they pay you to be a resident.

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      New Hampshire as well.

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        How is this possible? I thought income tax was a federal tax…

                                                                                        1. 4

                                                                                          In the US, there is a significant federal income tax and, usually, also a state income tax. Your paystub should detail what both are (may say “withholding”). Here in Illinois, my state income tax costs ~25% of my federal income tax.

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            Most states levy an income tax on top of the federal income tax. Exceptions: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_income_tax#States_with_no_individual_income_tax

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              From my experience in TX, those states vary a lot in which income profiles they’re overall best for, so worth doing some kind of calculation with your approximate individual circumstances if you’re going to use it for real decision-making. Example: TX has no income tax, but an extremely high property tax. That tends to be bad for people who have relatively high ratios of property to income, e.g. many middle-class homeowners have a ~3x ratio of property to income (e.g. $70k income, $200k home), and get hit hard by the property tax. But it’s good for people who have high income:property ratios (e.g. you make $10m/yr and own a $1m house), or who don’t own any property.

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                In other words, ditch the Valley, move to Washington :-)

                                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                                  In WA, you actually do have to pay state income tax if you’re self-employed (e.g., sell your own app through Apple/Google/whatnot), they call it B&O, and it depends on your Business Occupation (e.g., plumber, engineer etc).

                                                                                          2. 2

                                                                                            Washington has no income tax, either.

                                                                                            You still need to pay federal income tax, of course.

                                                                                          1. 5

                                                                                            A little off topic, but if anyone’s looking for a man page generator—as I thought this post might be about from the title :)—I’ve used help2man from the GNU project in the past and found it to be wonderful.

                                                                                            1. 8

                                                                                              Great story, and congratulations!

                                                                                              I love how lobste.rs is still so small that these kinds of personal stories are posted :)

                                                                                              1. 4

                                                                                                I’d love to see PGP commit signing integrated with Github someday. In the meantime, we just have to understand that the online commit log is not a definitive history of the source, even if it has a picture of the “author” beside it.

                                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                                  Github does track who pushed a commit, but it’s not exposed conveniently.

                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                    In the meantime, we just have to understand that the online commit log is not a definitive history of the source, even if it has a picture of the “author” beside it.

                                                                                                    Same about e-mail from famous people promising you millions and billboards signed “-God”.

                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                      You can PGP-sign tags, and then you’ll notice if anyone attempts to rewrite that history to do something like this afterwards. AIUI Torvalds considered reviewing tags better practice than signing each individual commit, and built the tool for that workflow.

                                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                                        I could see that working well in github workflow - sign a tag for every pull request. I can’t think of a repo I’ve worked on that has a ton of tags, though, might be a PITA (hmmm)

                                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                                          I once spoke to a functional purist who argued that we should avoid branches in git because they’re mutable. Want to propose a change? Push a tag. Want to update your proposal following feedback? Push a new tag.

                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                      If the Broadcom chips don’t work with OpenBSD on iMacs, how do people get WiFi? A dongle? Asking because I’m considering using it on mine.

                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                        Yes with usb dongles - the hardest part is ensuring you have supported chip set. I have always been lucky with the cheap ones.

                                                                                                      1. 32

                                                                                                        Something Arbitrary? — How did power, bluetooth, and wifi become synonymous with these symbols? Maybe the save icon could grab some random goodness of it’s own?

                                                                                                        Is this guy just dense? It obviously already has. There are loads of arbitrary icons we only recognize because we’ve learned what they mean, and the 3.5" floppy disk is one of them.

                                                                                                        For what it’s worth, there’s actually a pretty good justification for the power symbol.

                                                                                                        1. 14

                                                                                                          Also, the Wi-Fi symbol seems, to me, to obviously indicate something emanating from a point.

                                                                                                          The Bluetooth logo is definitely more arbitrary, though, but not completely—it is a rune for the initials of Harald Bluetooth who united the Danish kingdom in the 10th century.

                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                            Less clear than wifi is the fact that this symbol means wifi while this symbol means cellular, and there’s no real confusion between the two. How did that convention get established?

                                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                                              Here’s my guess: the 3 (or n, really) bar symbol is basically the symbol used in the 2G mobile phones, sometimes in conjunction with this weird antenna symbol and came before WiFi.

                                                                                                              It also makes perfect sense that WiFi is emanating from a point, since most people have set it up with a single AP and phone networks work from the perspective ot the user more like a network.

                                                                                                          2. 2

                                                                                                            Thanks for the link! I haven’t noticed the difference between standby and power on-off symbols before.

                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                              Bluetooth is also not entirely arbitrary, because it’s the H/B runes merged together (HB for Harald Bluetooth, the king who unified the Danish tribes, who Bluetooth is named after).