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    • a Git server
      • since I use pass for password management across all my devices, my password store is just another Git repository that lives on this Git server.
    • a Gopher server
    • a Syncthing server
      • since it’s my main/always-on Syncthing server, it’s also got two identical usb drives that I use for storage of everything (books, code, documents, backups), and a nightly cron job mirrors one usb to the other with rsync. So it’s kind of like a hacky RAID setup, in case one of the USB sticks stops working.

    That’s about all it does. The only other thing I did to make it all work nicely was to add a daily cron job for a DDNS script, which checks its IP, and if it’s changed (since ISPs do that from time to time), it updates its DNS records at my domain registrar. That way I get nice domains for things.

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      What is the URL of your gopherhole? finger redacted@1436.ninja for contact, please, if you’d rather not post…

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      Unpopular opinion: so what.

      I use small tools on my Gentoo install, the same ones I use on my Raspbian installs, the same ones on my Void install. There is a barrier to entry, the learning curve can be looked at this way. However the conversation should pick an audience. If you want Just Werks there is Windows, Mac, or Ubuntu. Persons that choose other distros are not necessarily looking for this. They possibly want maximum customization, or just plain looking for a challenge. If all distros were exactly the same the only other choice would be LFS or a BSD.

      tldr: people who want an ecosystem already choose a large distro.

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        Hm, i only provide an Atom. Makes me wonder if I’m excluding people?

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          I can see the RSS feed being more popular just by stint of being around longer (I don’t have records as to when I added that feed, but it was probably in the early 2000s). I added the JSON feed on a whim (because I could, quite easily) just two years ago and I’m surprised at how often it’s referenced.

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            I read your phlog on gopher. I had no idea until right now that json syndication was a thing. Are there clients for this that are meant for use in the way that RSS/Atom have historically been used?

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              JSON Feed made the rounds a bit ago, and I know that at least a few feedreaders added support. The one I mostly use (NewsBlur) is among them, but I don’t know that I’ve seen much published in it. I guess this is a reminder that it seems like an ok idea and I’ve been meaning to add it to my own site for a while.

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                I don’t know. I saw reference to JSON feeds two years ago and decided to add it (just because).

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              I appreciate you providing anything at all that can be subscribed to.

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                Thanks. I do try to keep on top of these things.

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              In retrospect it’s kind of amazing how quickly we moved from an Internet with no “like” counts (the golden age of blogging) to an Internet where it’s very difficult to find any community where “like” counts or upvotes are not a core part of the system. Even indie sites like Lobste.rs or Metafilter that eschew a lot of the apparatus of the modern Internet incorporate this very quantitative approach to community and social interaction.

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                Yes. The quieter, less-evaluative Internet was hijacked by one of addictive narcissism.

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                  After writing my earlier comment I realized that there is one type of online community I participate in that is completely free of likes/voting/ranking/quantitative anything: mailing lists.

                  It’s probably not a coincidence that I love mailing lists, while people whose Internet experience started even a few years later than mine did seem to really, really hate them. I wonder if there is a real generational (or internet-generational) divide here, or if I’m just an outlier.

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                    It’s probably not a coincidence that I love mailing lists, while people whose Internet experience started even a few years later than mine did seem to really, really hate them. I wonder if there is a real generational (or internet- generational) divide here, or if I’m just an outlier.

                    As a guy who first acquired an ISP in 1993, I can honestly say that I generally dislike mailing lists (like most people, I guess). I always think of them as a poor-man’s usenet, I would much rather just hop on tin(1) and read the latest posts in my subscribed groups.

                    Having said that, I am a member of some mailing lists that I genuinely enjoy. Though they are the exception, not the rule…

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                    It would be interesting to see an implementation of an upvote button that didn’t display the count to the users. You still get the “community” aspect of it, without the narcissistic side.

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                      HN does this.

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                        Right! For the comments. They still show the points for each story, which I think makes sense (or does it…?)

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                      Back then we had guestbooks and hit counters to provide the tingle of popularity that is oh so addictive.

                      I remember when I first added commenting to my blog and getting ten or so meaningfull comments within the first week of publishing a new post was a thrill to see; those were different to likes though, because they were actual meaningful interactions that often spawned discussion.