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    I could not agree more with his criticism of re-implementing features that are intrinsic to the web in JavaScript to make them “prettier” or “more responsive” while breaking so much basic functionality. Here’s a favorite of mine, loading more search results with an AJAX request when you reach the bottom of a page rather than having pagination with “Previous” and “Next” links. One culprit of this is YouTube; I’ll often browse a channel’s videos, find one that I like and click on it. When I’m done watching, I’ll press the back button of my browser and I’m back at the top and I need to scroll down a bunch of times to get back to where I was. Something similar happened on Twitch.tv when I was looking for a highlight from 2-3 years ago on a channel: I spent a good 5 minutes just scrolling down to the bottom, waiting for more results to appear and scrolling again. If there had been something with page numbers like we see on many BBS, I could’ve jumped easily by 20 pages or even just change the URL to a large enough number and go from there.

    If I was a better writer, I’d make a quip about “those who forget web 1.0 are doomed to reimplement it, badly” or something to that effect. It’s especially frustrating when you consider that many of those “new and improved” web experiences require so much memory and CPU power that they are completely unusable on a laptop that’s a few years old.

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      I could not agree more with his criticism of re-implementing features that are intrinsic to the web in JavaScript to make them “prettier” or “more responsive” while breaking so much basic functionality.

      Indeed. I have a special hatred for javascript scrollbars.

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        Infinite scrolling is like the new javascript scrollbars from 2003.

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          I think sites doing everything themselves in WebGL+Canvas because “the dom is too slow” may be the latest addition to the list of possible reasons for “why is my laptop on fire?”.
          Still a bit soon to tell. ;)

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        One solution that preserves both the convenience of infinite scroll and jumping to a given page (as well as saving your place on the page) would be keeping the page number in a URL fragment and incrementing it on infinite scroll. So far I’ve seen it used only in RES.