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    I guess I’m pretty boring. This is what I spend 99.9% of my day in (on HardenedBSD):

    1. sakura (okay, not a command-line tool. a terminal emulator, but it’s what I use to get to the command line)
    2. tmux
    3. zsh
    4. vim
    5. git
    6. weechat
    7. neomutt

    Except for using a web browser, this is what I spend my day in. Boring, but efficient.

    1. 1

      boring

      Do you happen to use relative numbers in vim?

      1. 2

        I’ve never heard of “relative numbers.” Until you just mentioned it, I didn’t even know that was a thing. I’ll give hybrid numbers a try and report back as to whether I like it.

        https://jeffkreeftmeijer.com/vim-number/

        1. 1

          I use hybrid numbers and they are quite useful!

    1. 1

      It IS quite nice now that they have ironed out most of the bugs. Pre 5.8.0 (I’m on 5.12.8 now and it works ootb), there were many bugs.

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        Is anyone else having issues with the new tab style? It seems like the tabs are blending with each other.

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          If all your tabs are in containers (due to Temporary Containers especially), they’re all very clearly demarcated by the container color lines :D

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            No, honestly it needed a refresh. Mozilla doesn’t seem to change their Firefox design anywhere near as much as google does with chrome. Which is nice but it does eventually get stale. When I first saw it on my personal laptop which I run beta on I loved it. I could not wait for it to get to stable for my other machines.

            It seems like the tabs are blending with each other.

            Why do you need clear definition? the second you hover over the middle (between the icon and the x) which is where I bet most people click even if there is clear definition, so honestly what is the difference? Seems like a quibble.

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              Why do you need clear definition?

              Not OP but I also hate this. I “need” clear definition so that I can read tab titles properly (otherwise the titles just blend into each other) and, more importantly, so that I “know” where to point my mouse at in order to switch to a new tab. The way you “need” clear definition on buttons, otherwise they just look like labels. I know there’s a hover animation but you have to get there in order to hover.

              1. 1

                My initial reaction is that the tab titles are separated well enough thanks to the favicon between them. The screenshots honestly look pretty readable to me. I haven’t tried it for myself yet though, and this is all subjective anyways.

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                  If the favicon is colourful and/or obvious enough, it’s not a problem. But in this day and age 8 out of 10 favicons are grayscale/monocolour anonymous icons, half of which are basically just a letter in a circle, so the favicon doesn’t look too different from the text. My eye vision is not the best, given that I haven’t been in the 18-25 target demographic for a while, so it’s not exactly the best mechanism for separation…

            2. 4

              Yes, but… check out the new Add-On “Firefox Color”. It’s a point-and-click themer.

              Admittedly, I don’t understand 2/3 of the choices, and the Firefox UI team seems to focus on completely different parts of the UI than I do, but I got it to make the current tab obviously different from the other tabs while keeping the other tabs high-contrast.

              1. 2

                I’m still tweaking it, but am fairly happy with the Acme-esque theme I’ve made. This is a neat little add on.

                Admittedly, I don’t understand 2/3 of the choices

                This helped.

              2. 2

                Yeah, on macos at least, the non-selected tabs sure could use some kind of demarcation. The selected tab has it, but on the non-selected tabs (especially with more than a few open tabs), it looks pretty messy.

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                  The tabs don’t feel less like tabs, more like random floating buttons, disconnected from the content.

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                  I find it fascinating, but more because it is a prolog like language that is written in forth.

                  I do have trouble following the count example in the manual.

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                    Although logic programming and stack-based programming are very different paradigms from a user perspective, fast Prolog implementations typically compile to stack-based bytecode, the Warren Abstract Machine. So on the implementation side it’s less of an impedance mismatch than one might expect.

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                      ‘Stack-based VM’ and ‘stack-based programming language’ are two very different things.

                      1. 3

                        I’m not saying you’re wrong but your claim is unsubstantiated. Generally it’s more interesting if you explain the differences.

                        From my pov it’s programming languages all the way down so the difference is mainly whether you consider your language an IR or a UI.

                        1. 2

                          In terms of their goals yes, but you can treat a stack-based programming language as basically just a stack-based VM target if you want. For example here’s a paper from 1987 showing how to use a WAM-style compilation strategy to compile Prolog to Forth.

                      2. 2

                        As a prolog enthusiast, I did enjoy that mind bending aspect of it.

                        1. 2

                          It doesn’t have all the fun Prolog features like unification, but it may be easier to reason about, and it definitely makes its multithreaded nature easier to implement. Disclaimer: I helped with the ppc64le port.

                      1. 3

                        Hmmm, it could also explain all my bugs in production :o

                        1. 4

                          I took a course in Prolog programming at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (Canada) in 1993, and though I never became proficient at using Prolog, this article was a fascinating read. The code samples shown in the paper look familiar. Now I feel the urge to re-learn Prolog with https://swi-prolog.org/. Thanks! One more thing to add to my bucket list.

                          1. 4

                            Prolog is always mind blowing when you visit it. I return to Prolog for “therapy” every two years to do some toy / recreational programming gaining a different angle on things.

                            1. 4

                              If you have time, check out the paper “Use of Prolog for developing a new programming language.” as well.

                              1. 2

                                Remarkable, thank-you again. I spent a few months learning Erlang five years ago, but did not know about Prolog’s influence. I will make time to read this one too.

                                I always thought that if I ever get a long-bone fracture or long-term illness, I’d use that time to play a game like Grand Theft Auto V. Now I’m thinking I’d rather delve into historic and notable programming languages.

                          1. 3

                            Homelab!

                            1. 35

                              I’m a chocolatier. I buy couvature in bulk and make chocolates. I usually bring them to events and conferences for funsies. I currently have cherry cordials, taro truffles, and candied orange peels in my cupboard.

                              I do a lot of cooking in general, too.

                              My other big hobby is juggling. I can do a five ball cascade one time in three, but these days I’ve been slacking off on toss juggling in favor of cigar boxes.

                              I want to volunteer more and learn knitting, but haven’t really started doing either of those.

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                                Did you grow up with someone who was a chocolatier? How’d you get into it.

                                1. 5

                                  Nah, I didn’t even know how to cook until I got to college. Then I got obsessed. One Christmas I was alone on campus, got cabin fever, and decided I was gonna learn confectionary. Been doing it ever since!

                                2. 6

                                  I’m a chocolatier. I buy couvature in bulk and make chocolates. I usually bring them to events and conferences for funsies. I currently have cherry cordials, taro truffles, and candied orange peels in my cupboard.

                                  Oh that sounds like a lot of fun. I didn’t think of that as a hobby, any tips for anyone who wants to get started as an amateur? Recommended books or websites?

                                  (I would just like to try this once, sounds like a nice activity to do with a kid as well!)

                                  1. 10

                                    I did a writeup here last time this question was asked!

                                    1. 2

                                      Thanks for the link and writeup!

                                  2. 4

                                    Ever since @JordiGH mentioned knitting, I’ve been wanting to join ravelry and learn to knit. I have yet to start as well.

                                    1. 4

                                      Do it! Yarn and needles are cheap to buy at your local craft mart, so it’s low cost to learn and find out if you like it. Ravelry has lots of patterns for basic coasters, which are small enough learn on quickly and finish a project quickly.

                                    2. 4

                                      knitting

                                      I love knitting, it keeps me sane. I have a pair of socks in my bag that have an easy pattern, so I have something to occupy my hands in meetings. And I work on more complex stuff in the evenings so my Youtube and Netflix downtime has something to show for itself.

                                      1. 3

                                        Time to start making your own chocolate then. I use a Premier Chocolate Refiner.

                                      1. 21

                                        Currently most of my reading has been juggling political philosophy books.

                                        My main list is: The Origins of Capitalism, Carceral Capitalism, Why I’ve Stopped Talking (To White People) About Race, and October (by Mieville)

                                        However, I usually keep on having to stop reading these, because, in the case of Meiksins’ book, the density, and in the case of the rest, people have a habit of being disgusting creatures when The System tells them it’s acceptable. One part of October describes how, in the run-up to the revolution, a right-wing ‘protest’ where they locked a town-full of jewish people inside a church and set it alight…

                                        So for the inter-rim between those books, I’ve been ripping through Whipping Girl, it’s ridiculously accessible and a very good deconstruction of gender and how society deals with it. I also recently obtained a copy of Bruce Lee’s “Fighting Method” for fitness reasons.

                                        Another book I obtained recently was Morton’s “Humankind: Solidarity with non-human people”, which rather surprisingly turned out to be a Marxist argument for the better-treatment of animals. The first five pages demonstrate the author has clearly done his philosophical research, however, so I am rather looking forward to it.

                                        1. 4

                                          The Origins of Capitalism is an excellent book. The way it traces the development and solidification of institutions, and the way they channel human behavior and potential, dissolved a whole bunch of my preconceived notions about the nature of things.

                                          You might also like A Brief History of Neoliberalism by David Harvey

                                          1. 4

                                            I’m doing 52 for 52. I read a sci-fi book every week in an effort to relearn(?) focus which social media and the internet has almost certainly destroyed. I’m currently reading “The Dispossessed” by Ursula K. Le Guin.

                                            1. 3

                                              Been looking for some books like this (and the Mieville has been on my list for some time), those look worth a shot - thanks. I have the same problem with political/history books, for what it’s worth’ I can only take so much depressing history before I need to clear my head with something lighter.

                                            1. 5

                                              Everyone here seems like a morning person…

                                              1. 8

                                                I typically get up around 10am, if it makes you feel better. :-)

                                                1. 1

                                                  Hey, same as me! I kept trying to shift to an earlier schedule since bosses tend to prefer it. Brain just doesn’t agree with it. They and I are happier if they schedule me in a bit later to leave a bit later.

                                                2. 2

                                                  6am isn’t early in my world. I usually get up at 4am for exercise. Have done most days for the past 18 years.

                                                  Been starting work most days around 6am for the past 6 or 7.

                                                  Experimenting with injecting some leisure time into my morning by starting work at 7:30-8am.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    By “world” you mean you live in a Nordic country?

                                                  2. 2

                                                    It was this comment that inspired me to write mine. ;)

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Frankly, I’m surprised no one posted a night schedule.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        if it were up to me I’d work in fits and starts from about 10am to midnight. Unfortunately an office job comes with an expectation of visibility, and an attempt to travel at the same time as other road users.

                                                        1. 4

                                                          The Linux Programming Interface is very good. A lot lower-level than I normally go, but still fascinating.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Any similar ones you’d recommend ?

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment, I guess? I don’t really read many low-level books like that. Most of the higher-level things I like are more conceptual than specific.

                                                          2. 2

                                                            Soul of a New Machine is a delightful read, and if you like it I’d check out Masters of Doom.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I’ve read it already! It was an exciting read. I read it one sitting.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            From Bacteria to Bach and Back - The Evolution of Minds To me this (philosophical) AI discussion ist really fascinating and it was recommended from a class reading list

                                                            1. 3

                                                              This looks superb. Thanks for the pointer!

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Another would be Superintelligence by Nick Bostrom

                                                                “I highly recommend this book” –Bill Gates

                                                                “Nick Bostrom makes a persuasive case that the future impact of AI is perhaps the most important issue the human race has ever faced. Instead of passively drifting, we need to steer a course. Superintelligence charts the submerged rocks of the future with unprecedented detail. It marks the beginning of a new era.” –Stuart Russell, Professor of Computer Science, University of California, Berkley

                                                              2. 2

                                                                What a fantastic find! I hope it is not too dense.

                                                              1. 9

                                                                Lots of books on the coral reef these days! I get all my programming book recommendations from this community, so here are some titles from other areas of my reading life that have crustacean appeal.

                                                                Two tech history books:

                                                                Two books on contemporary technology:

                                                                And two novels:

                                                                • Nova by Chip Delany. Finally read this classic from 1968 and there is so much to chew on in 2017: post-work economics, cyborg spinal interfaces, race and racism after interstellar travel.
                                                                • The Devil in Silver by Victor LaValle. Creeped-out horror set in a modern-day psychiatric hospital that flips “Cuckoo’s Nest” on its head.
                                                                1. 2

                                                                  Anymore book recommendations on the topic of computing history ?

                                                                  1. 3
                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      Sure! :) Computer: A History of the Information Machine by Martin Campbell-Kelly and William Aspray is a drop-dead classic. (The first edition came out in 1996 but they’ve since updated and expanded the book with contributions from other historians.) Or, for a deep dive on a single machine with an unusual story, check out Now the Chips Are Down, a history of the BBC Micro by Alison Gazzard.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    I always list the best I read during the year as my Christmas book list.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Awesome! Had to check book tag also since 2016 & 2017 are tagged books.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Thanks. Your comment prompted me to make the tags consistent, e.g., book vs books, or even Just Christmas. So the other yearly suggestions are now listed on the same tag :-)

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      A few draft picks for best book I’ve read this year (all them recommended by fellow crustaceans):

                                                                      • Interconnections: Bridges, Routers, Switches, and Internetworking Protocols by Radia Perlman
                                                                      • The Forever War by Joe Haldeman
                                                                      • Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein
                                                                      • The Social Amoebae: The Biology of Cellular Slime Molds by John Tyler Bonner
                                                                      • Dancing Naked in the Mind Field by Kary Mullis

                                                                      Worst book bar none:

                                                                      • Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty by Abhijit Banerjee
                                                                      1. 18

                                                                        This history fails to acknowledge the grid computing era which predates cloud computing by several years. One of the goals of grid computing was much like “serverless” functions, ie the ability to have a function run on demand, on any available node in the grid.

                                                                        1. 22

                                                                          History begins with the Internet in the world of computing these days. It is an inconvenient truth that virtualization has existed in mainframes since the 1960s.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            Definitely true. Maybe I can mention this as well :)

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Really?

                                                                              1. 7

                                                                                CP-40 was a research project in 1964 that ran on the 360. IBM released a product from that called VM in 1972. I wouldn’t doubt you could still run it on a z machine. This eventually turned into z/VM, which has a long line of products before it.

                                                                                Edit: Here’s an article from 2009 about it, interviewing one of the people who worked on it.

                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                Any good books/sites/anything to read about this? That’s absolutely fascinating!

                                                                              3. 3

                                                                                Thank you for your comment @patrickdlogan. This is definitely a good hint to improve the article, maybe I can add an extra section to provide this bit of history. I will start to dig some info, so feel free to send me any link you might think to be relevant for this section :)

                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  Probably as good a place as any is this Wikipedia article.

                                                                                  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_computing

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    thanks!

                                                                                  2. 3

                                                                                    Here’s a link to one of the old ones that were easy to acquire:

                                                                                    http://toolkit.globus.org/toolkit/

                                                                                    Click What Is Globus at bottom left to see some familiar-looking concepts in a chart.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      BOINC is a similar thing, also open source.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        Thanks :)

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      Legos are basically the best toy ever, in my opinion. If your kids don’t have legos yet, buy some! :)

                                                                                      Especially just the brick sets as opposed to the kits, the kits always made me feel like I was forced into a limited number of designs. That said some of the bricks in the kits are super nice to have, like wheels and stuff.

                                                                                    1. 5

                                                                                      I’m reading Oathbreaker by Brandon Sanderson, it’s not networking, it’s not sci-fi, but it certainly is good!

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        For more fantasy, I’m reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson. It’s ten books and I’m currently about to finish the sixth. Definitely a great read for anyone who loves good worldbuilding or fantasy characterization.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          This series is the only fantasy blockbuster series I’ve finished. Good quality right up until maybe the end. I especially like the shift to an entirely different continent and system of magic around book 5.

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            I got to 6 or 7 in the series and started to lose track of what was going on. I absolutely love the world though, and definitely intend to pick them back up in the future.

                                                                                          2. 2

                                                                                            How are the other books in the series ?

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              I really enjoyed them. I’m a big fan of Sanderson’s work generally, and this series seems to be one of his best so far.

                                                                                              However if you’re considering starting the series, you should know that it’s only 3/5 complete, so you’ll have a long wait to finish it!

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                I waited for “The Wheel of Time”. I just hope it is fun to read!

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  I’ve not read it, I’ll stick it on my list :)

                                                                                            2. 2

                                                                                              it’s not networking, it’s not sci-fi,

                                                                                              Honestly, I’m really eager for that kind of discussion around here. I get tired of everyone recommending the same circle of tech books or science fiction.

                                                                                              Thanks for the suggestion, I’ll take a look!

                                                                                              Edit: Oh… it’s fantasy. Erm, I suppose the tribe doesn’t wander far from the community-approved genres.

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                If you like history, I’m still chewing on Empire of the Steppes. The book is always described as “majestic” and “sweeping”. I’ve never read another history book that provides such an encompassing view. Its scope extends from mainland China, to the silk road oasis kingdoms, to Persia, to Kiev, to Attila’s march on Rome. It’s fascinating how a military campaign in China can set off a chain reaction like billiard balls and cause an invasion in Europe.

                                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                                  Another amazing history is Jonathan Spence’s God’s Chinese Son, but really, you cannot go wrong with Spence. He is a magician.

                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                    Oooh, that does sound great! Thanks, I’ll definitely look for that one!

                                                                                              1. 7

                                                                                                I’m reading Catherine the Great for fun and Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured to prep for the upcoming EMT classes. I just finished The Storm Before the Storm, which was fantastic. I love everything Mike Duncan does.

                                                                                                For classic science fiction, here are some of my favorites:

                                                                                                • Dune, Frank Herbert. The first book deserved every once of praise it got. The second book is pretty good. I wasn’t a fan of the third book. The fourth is awful, and they just get worse from there.
                                                                                                • Lord of Light, Roger Zelazny. One of my favorite SF books ever. Con artist pretending to be Buddha tries to free humanity from con artists pretending to be Hindu gods, in the process accidentally recreating most of the Buddhist myths.
                                                                                                • Book of the New Sun, Gene Wolfe. A quintilogy that was one of the foundational books in the “Dying Earth” style. A professional torturer is exiled from the guild and wanders around a bunch and sort of becomes Jesus Christ. I like it as an example of how you can write a religious novel without it being overbearing or alienating to nonbelievers. Another good book like that is Small Gods by Terry Pratchett, but that’s more fantasy than SF.
                                                                                                • Embassytown, China Mieville. Not a classic (came out in the past decade), but my favorite Mieville.
                                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                                  I love Lord of Light, it’s one of the few books I have read more than once

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    EMT classes/exams aren’t too bad. Practicals/clinicals are nerve wracking. Using EMR/foosoftware is stepping on legos.

                                                                                                    Check this out if you have five minutes emin5. Her youtube channel is filled with useful videos.

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    I am reading Fumbling the Future and Pearls of Functional Algorithm Design.

                                                                                                    For classic Science Fiction, I would recommend some John Brunner (The Shockwave Rider, Stand on Zanzibar…).

                                                                                                    For networking, it really depends what you’re looking for. For instance, if you want a good reference about the main protocols of the Internet, this is pretty good. TCP/IP illustrated is also a good alternative (I only read the first edition which did not have IPv6, but this one does).

                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                      The Idea Factory may be something you’d like as well.