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    I’m @kev@fosstodon.org. I run the Fosstodon instance with my friend Mike. Fosstodon focusses on tech and open source software. We’re a friendly bunch…most of the time! 😊

    https://fosstodon.org

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      @jamesog@mastodon.social - although I rarely post as I largely forgot about it :-(

      I imagine if I found a decent iOS client I’d use it more. Does anyone have any recommondations?

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        Toot! Is an excellent app for iOS, I’d highly recommend it.

        https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/toot/id1229021451

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          @freddyb@mstdn.io, but also stopped using it and forgot about it. Looking for recommended mobile clients as well.

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            For iOS, I would probably recommend FediApp. If you’re on Android, Tusky or FediLab are quite popular. Husky is a fork of Tusky that supports additional features that Pleroma has, such as Markdown posts, chat, significantly higher character limit, etc.

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              I use Tusky; it’s the best app I’ve used on Android. (though there’s not a ton of competition for that tbh)

              It supports higher character limits and rendering markdown posts now; maybe it didn’t a while ago. Husky is most well-known for removing Tusky’s block on white supremacist instances.

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                Tusky is specifically a Mastodon client while Husky is specifically a Pleroma client; you can of course use one with the other but they each add support for features implemented by their respective platforms before the other. For example, I just installed Tusky and it still has no reactions or chat while Husky does because both of those are Pleroma-specific.

                Husky is most well-known for removing Tusky’s block on white supremacist instances.

                I would argue that Husky should be known as a Pleroma client because that’s what it is.

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          That all sounds very interesting, but has the performance of Talk improved any over the last year or so?

          Last time I tried it, for a group of 5 people, the performance was practically unusable and it was full of bugs.

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            Is linking random web games allowed now? 😯

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              It’s a game and a cool display of development. I thought this would be perfect for Lobste.rs.

              Clearly not though judging by the downvoted. :(

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              I honestly don’t understand why the author wants to move to a static site.

              The reasons stated are basically

              • different tech stack (Linux instead of *BSD)
              • slight incompatibility with org-mode files
              • maintenance overhead

              To me, these don’t sound like unsurmountable problems. One can run WP on a BSD. I’m sure there’s a plugin for WP that can handle org-mode files, and one of the main complaints I’ve read about Hugo and Jekyll is the maintenance problems they bring.

              The downsides seem to be

              • risk losing comments/ have to roll your own
              • RSS incompatibilities
              • a hell of a lot of work that can be put into actually blogging
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                I’ve recently moved from WP to Jekyll, but for different reasons than the OP. Ultimately it’s their decision what platform they use.

                I can understand the maintenance argument, not with regards to WP, but WRT the stack WP sits on top of. However, the only thing they’re removing by switching to Hugo is MySQL and PHP. Two less software packages to manage, I suppose.

                If maintenance is a problem, and they want to focus on writing, why self host at all? Why not go with something like Netlify or AWS Amplify?

                It’s fun to tinker though. 😊

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                Looks nice. I’m curious what does complying with the GPL3 license of SimpleCSS looks like for a site using it? I imagine if you just drop it in, it doesn’t effect your project but if you use a bundler to “compile” a final website artefacts perhaps it applies to the whole project?

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                  I actually just changed the license to MIT. I’m not a licensing expert (far from it!) and didn’t realise that the GPL doesn’t allow for closed source redistribution. MIT seems more permissive in that regard.

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                    Great!

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                  It’s more like a CSS snippet than a framework

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                    Considering what it tries to achieve that’s a good thing.

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                      Calling it framework won’t be fair enough, a CSS Library is fine, Frameworks are vast and provide everything.

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                      I’m totally fine diluting the meaning of framework like this.

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                        Calling it framework won’t be fair enough, a CSS Library is fine, Frameworks are vast and provide everything.

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                          attempt to provide everything.

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                            Except that it doesn’t attempt, it’s a beautifier.

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                              I was saying that Frameworks attempt to provide everything, not that this specific thing is a framework or does attempt to provide everything.

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                            The definition of a framework according to the Cambridge dictionary is:

                            a supporting structure around which something can be built

                            I think this project satisfies that definition. Yes, software frameworks like Bootstrap are goliath, but that doesn’t mean something small like Simple.css can’t be a framework.

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                          The linked page doesn’t actually describe Simple.css as a framework, it describes it as a “classless CSS template.” I’ve made a suggestion to change the title of the link here to reflect that.

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                            In that case, it’s fair, promoting it as framework won’t be fair.

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                          I use Miniflux’s hosted service - https://miniflux.app/hosting.html

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                            Maybe because the dark mode is not that great for our eyes?

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                              Absolutely (and thanks for posting a link to my blog! :)) it’s not great for your eyes, but it’s about giving users the choice.

                              I don’t use dark mode 90% of the time, but from time to time it’s nice to have the ability to switch if you want to.

                              Plus, some people prefer it. :)

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                                With all due respect, some random guy saying it’s bad for me, won’t change my personal experience of how much better it feels when the color-scheme is right.

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                              I’m curious about the transition. How did you migrate all the WordPress blogs and pages? I’m interested in moving my WordPress monster and had thought about Jekyll in the past.. very interested in your experience there.

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                                I used a script to export every post and all images to markdown. Then it was just a case of adding frontmatter to the posts. Pages I just did manually.

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                                  Not the author, but there are plugins for exporting from WP to Jekyll, like this one.

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                                  I feel like you spend an excessive amount of time on your website and the things that surround it. Not faulting you for it—just making an observation. Also £30 p/m for a website? That’s a lot of money.

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                                    Agreed on both counts. That was the rationale for the change.

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                                    You really spent $30 a month on Wordpress plugins? wew

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                                      No. I spent 30/m on the entire site - hosting, CDN and a couple of plugins.

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                                      I like the increase in personality and being a bit more open about yourself. Truly reminds me of the 90s web.

                                      300kb is a lot in 90s terms though ;) I challenge you to dramatically reduce your website and will accept a challenge from you in return (mine is already quite slim. Less than 5kn iirc).

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                                          Nice job! Looking forward to a write up of how you did it.ä and waiting for a counter challenge;-)

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                                          Haha you’re absolutely right, but it’s not an authentic 90s site (did emojis even exist then?) it’s just a nod to the 90s. Considering we’re in the days of the multi megabyte webpages, I think 300kb is pretty good. 😊

                                          Although, I do like a challenge…

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                                            Emoji were standardized in unicode in 2010. Windows 7 added support for them in 2012. So no, they didn’t exist in the 90s, not even in the 00s (as we know them today).

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                                              Sure. For webapps 300kb is alright. but for a blog? ;)

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                                                I think for any webpage these days, 300KB is ok. It’s way lower than what it was with the old theme.

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                                                  Ah, come on. Accept my challenge and return the favor! I’d be curious what I ought to improve :)

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                                            Google is pretty good at making cool things, aren’t they? Google Search, Material Design, Google plus (nah), and now this. In case you didn’t catch it, the about page says that it was made by Jigsaw, which is a google subsidiary.

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                                              That doesn’t make it any less useful.

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                                              If the site is about no JS, then what’s the point in having a bar that shows the page size? Is the size of the page somehow relevant to sites not running JS?

                                              I get that this is a direct copy of sites like 1mb, 512kb and 200kb club, but I don’t get the focus on page size for this application. Surely there’s a better measure to add on the page?

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                                                What’s a better measure? I’m open to suggestions.

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                                                  NoJS vs JS is a binary distinction, there is nothing to measure other than presence or absence.

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                                                    Sure. That’s The criteria for being added to the list the page size is an objective measure to stack rank them. It could have been alphabetical but size is a bit more substantial.

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                                                      A minimal or lightweight site could have more data per page in principle, if it has more content. But in practice heavier pages have more cosmetic BS, not more content, which I think is what you were hoping to get at.

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                                                    That’s kinda my point…there’s no way to measure a negative, so it seems counterintuitive to measure something completely unrelated just for the sake of having “a measurement”.

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                                                      I disagree

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                                                      How about full site loading time with a browser? I think considering that people usually dislike JS in that it makes sites feel slow, this would be a more useful measure.

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                                                        Good idea. I’ll investigate how easy it is to run phantom or cdp in GitHub actions.

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                                                          I also agree with the other comments here arguing that there are ways to judiciously use JS… however, JS usage is definitely overall ridiculous and out of hand and so I can’t resist pointing out that a particularly ironic metric to look at here would be Time to First Meaningful Paint, which AFAIK basically only exists because of dumb JS tomfoolery “booting” pages and filling in all the content client-side.

                                                          Maybe you could even have a second version of the page that would add (with red bars for “bad” or something) a few JS heavy sites to demonstrate just how dramatically improved TTFMP is on the no-JS sites?

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                                                    On one hand, I get that it’s nice to have a centralized place for comments, and not have to worry about spam (for the most part), but part of me wonders if there’s a better way to meet people in multiple places for comments.

                                                    Once I redo my blog, I want the comments section to be links to places like twitter, mastodon, maybe here or HN, where there’s an easy way to dialog for people who don’t want to be forced to make a GitHub account. Just a thought for people looking to have a third-party host their comments.

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                                                      Once I redo my blog, I want the comments section to be links to places like twitter, mastodon, maybe here or HN, where there’s an easy way to dialog

                                                      That doesn’t sound like it follows. If someone on Twitter comments on your blog will that be reflected to Mastodon? Will someone who then replies on Mastodon be able to reply? I suppose it’s true in the strict definition of dialog (i.e. two participants) for communication between you and one other person at a time but it sounds as if you’ll end up with a load of distinct views on different subsets of the comments that people interact with.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I’ve had that in the past, where “comments” are pulled from multiple sources, like Mastodon and Twitter via Webmention. But I didn’t want all the noise on my blog posts, and I didn’t want to have to manage them (they come through as WP comments). This way, there’s a platform for people to discuss the post, without the extra headache for me of managing comments.

                                                        HN or here would be great alternatives to GitHub Issues, but I think it would have to be HN rather than here, as the topics are VERY focused here (that’s a good thing), so a general life update, for example, wouldn’t be appropriate to post here. So there would effectively be no comments on that post.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Or just start your own subreddit.

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                                                        looks similar to utterances

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                                                          A few people have told me about Utterances since I published this post. It looks really cool. I deliberately wanted the comments to be a separate thing from the blog though, so I wouldn’t want to use a tool like this to pull them in.

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                                                            Also Gitalk

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                                                            GitHub does commenting reasonably well indeed, but I’m worried about adding even more dependencies on the centralized, commercial service belonging to Microsoft.

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                                                              I get what you’re saying, but I wouldn’t call it a “dependency” personally. It’s a nice to have thing that I offer to people who want to use it. If it goes away (doubtful) it’s no big deal.

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                                                                It’s a “dependency” in that it’s

                                                                1. A software implementation…
                                                                2. …written by someone else…
                                                                3. …that can change at any time, without your input

                                                                Something like a mailing list wouldn’t have this issue. Since many people don’t like the concept of “mailing lists”, simply including a mailto: link at the bottom of the article and a link to the online list archives without including the words “mailing list” on your website should do the trick.

                                                                Most commenting platforms require users to create an account with their email; if you require an email, you might as well use it.

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                                                              Oh this is a delightful redesign, so much more personality. How did you make these backgrounds?

                                                              1. 1

                                                                It was a mixture of trawling the Internet, and making my own in Inkscape/GIMP.