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    I love that 6 out of 11 items have received a post-hoc “update” because that’s just the way POSIX shell is. (No offense intended to the author — it really is just that arcane that no-one could get it right first try, even when setting out to write an article about portable shell.)

    1. [Comment removed by author]

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        GitHub supports issue references that start with the repository name

        This is a bit unobvious, but the name in the name#number format is actually the owner name, not the repository name; it’s intended for cross-fork linking. (e.g. I have a fork of lobsters/lobsters at kivikakk/lobsters. If you’re making a comment in the lobsters-owned repo and want to refer to issue number 123 in my fork, you can write kivikakk#123.) You’ll need to use the full owner/name#number format if the repository name differs.

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          Teach me to learn the interface by poking around lobsters/lobsters, bors-ng/bors-ng, and discourse/discourse 😅

          So, okay, you get to use owner#17 and owner/repository#17

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        For this reason we use GH- prefix, not only rebaser, but commit message editor also use # as a comment character.

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          It’s worth noting that — for some rather legacy reasons — you can use the prefix GH- instead of # when autolinking issues/PRs in GitHub comments, commit messages, etc.

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          Has this guy ever head of Donald Norman’s work? Or Jef Raskin’s? Larry Tesler’s? Have you? I mean, there’s literally decades of empirical research on this subject.

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            I feel like you may have missed the main thrust of the article, which isn’t specific to modality as a concept.

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              Sorry if I wasn’t clear, I just meant the wiki link as a relevant example of human factors / HCI research. It explains some of the drawbacks to Vim’s design choices. The field has lots of other interesting things to say too. It does not in general support the idea (assumption?) that powerful tools must have difficult-to-use human interfaces.

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                Ah, I understand you better now! Thank you.

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            They can do this because Windows is closed-source and no one can fork Windows. Look at the Chrome and WWW situation, Chrome is open source, so if community is actively protesting, they are taking it into account.

            Morale: use fork-able (open source) software.

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              Technically speaking, Chromium is open source.

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                  Right but also on the list.

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                    I mean, firefox gets listed because it recommends nonfree software; chromium gets listed because it has unlicensed components (aka proprietary).

                    There’s an important difference there.

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                      Time for GNU IceCat!

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              “This is a complex technical field with nontrivial trade-offs in time and expressiveness! I know, let’s tie it to gender politics and Critical Theory! That’ll solve everything!” — The least likely sentence in the Universe.

              Next up is “Rust: Is Ownership a Reactionary Plot?”

              Edit: OK, this author tipped their hand a bit too much at the end:

              Let’s call a spade a spade.

              This is an outright racist dog-whistle, and isn’t even subtle. I can’t just play along anymore if that’s the level of humor on display. I’ll leave my jokes (such as they are) but I have to call that much out, at least.

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                This is an outright racist dog-whistle, and isn’t even subtle.

                Isn’t it? I had no idea until (prompted by your comment) I googled around and found how it’d acquired those implications recently in America. It’s used in Australia without any such nuance, and presumably other countries too. I wouldn’t be quick to assert that it’s a dog whistle, especially not in an article that’s being criticised for leaning too hard in the social justice direction.

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                  I wouldn’t be quick to assert that it’s a dog whistle, especially not in an article that’s being criticised for leaning too hard in the social justice direction.

                  That’s one thing which makes me conclude it’s meant in a racist fashion: The article does lean too hard in a social justice direction, as if it were written by someone trying to discredit that viewpoint by making it look ridiculous, or at least have some fun at its expense.

                  Any viewpoint has honest adherents who can make it look ridiculous all on their own, but the combination of factors here made me conclude it is, in fact, a racist dog-whistle.

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                    as if it were written by someone trying to discredit that viewpoint by making it look ridiculous, or at least have some fun at its expense

                    Mmn, now I see what you mean. :/

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                  ‘Call a spade a spade’ is not a dog whistle and never has been a dog whistle. It’s a common phrase, used all over the world.

                  I’ve downvoted you for trolling, because there’s absolutely no way you are unaware that ‘call a spade a spade’ is a common term with no racist implications. You’re flamebaiting and trolling and should go to HackerNews where this kind of discussion belongs.

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                    ‘Call a spade a spade’ is not a dog whistle and never has been a dog whistle.

                    It’s become a dog whistle through usage of “spade” as a term for Black people, and is undeniably questionable at best, and, in the context of an over-the-top hyperbolic attempt to make Liberals look like lunatics, must be interpreted in that fashion.

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                      ‘Spade’ is not a term for black people, and is not ‘questionable’. Nobody is talking about ‘liberals’ either.

                      Stop assuming everyone shares your ridiculous American political ideas.

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                        ‘Spade’ is not a term for black people, and is not ‘questionable’.

                        I’ve just demonstrated otherwise.

                        Stop assuming everyone shares your ridiculous American political ideas.

                        And now you’ve tipped your hand, troll.

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                          Turns out that even within a single language, words can have meanings that change by period, context or location. Shocking, I know.

                          1. [Comment removed by moderator pushcx: Personal insults are over the line. It's clear you two will never agree, so move on.]

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                              Don’t get hysterical.

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                    I appreciate both the desire to have a formal spec which implementations can be compared against, and the desire to capture things as they really are. A spec no-one follows is worse than useless; someone will write an implementation against it, then wonder why everything else seems to do things incompatibly.

                    Unfortunately, it’s very difficult to formally capture what’s arisen from a process of ad hoc implementations. I experienced this working on CommonMark; its spec is incredibly long, and isn’t even a grammar; it’s more like what WHATWG put together for the URI, for the same reasons.

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                      Bear in mind that the URL syntax did have RFCs, so it didn’t purely arise from a process of ad hoc implementations. I’m not 100% sure the RFC did actually capture what browsers were already doing, but it certainly helped in focusing the existing implementations towards a common agreement. WHATWG’s spec is a step back from that, IMO.

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                        Thing is, simply having an RFC is not enough for it to be followed. Here’s the obligatory classic link: https://web.archive.org/web/20110904005422/http://diveintomark.org/archives/2004/08/16/specs

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                          haha, that’s a great one! I did’t know it yet. Thanks for pointing it out

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                          WHATWG’s spec is a step back from that, IMO.

                          Agreed. It’s a pity, and now that this is done, it’d be very difficult to try to converge again on a spec in the future.

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                          Getting downvoted for speaking the truth

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                            Note that the post title was not “What axe do you have to grind about Lobsters?”

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                              I know. I like getting downvoted. It’s entertaining

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                            I thought this headline was a joke until I clicked on the source article. Why on earth do people think DRM is a sane idea?

                            I’d love to see a technical post-mortem on this, that would be fantastic.

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                              I’m a bit lost; isn’t this the technical post-mortem?

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                                Why on earth do people think DRM is a sane idea?

                                Because it works. This kind of DRM exposes what DRM was all about from the beginning. It’s about controlling paying customers to keep them locked in to your system. If you buy a game on steam you are locked in to sticking with steam, if you buy a coffee pod machine you are locked in to buying coffee from the company that made the machine.

                                DRM was never meant to be technically impossible to break. Sure, OP has cracked it but 99.99% of the companies customers will not know how to do this and will continue to pay for refills.

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                                  Agreed, I think its a very profitable business model, even in my case I bought at least 6 soap cartridges before I decided to reverse it.

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                                Fun fact: GitHub once had a humans.txt that was generated from staff users’ profiles.

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                                  Does anyone know why they stopped?

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                                    Privacy concerns. Not all staff wanted to broadcast the fact that they worked for a particular company. It also got a bit unwieldy as our numbers have grown.

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                                  I took me many years, but I’ve finally accepted the rule of three; I’ve burnt myself repeatedly on my poorly thought-out abstractions that support a single actual use case.

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                                    This is exactly how I work, and I went through a similar process to the article writer in coming to learn that premature abstraction fails for the same reasons premature optimisation does: before you have enough data to analyse (in the form of code that executes slowly or obvious refactoring candidates), you’re working blind, and it’s sheer luck if what you decided to optimise or abstract would’ve been a hot path or good model. Having only two similar things isn’t enough to predict what the “pivot points” of an abstraction over them and future things might be.

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                                    I don’t understand how/if webmentions are significantly different from the pingbacks everbody used to have on their WordPress blog (because I think they were enabled by default?) and then promptly disabled because of too much spam.

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                                      Webmentions have been modeled after pingback. They are basically a refinement.

                                      Regarding spam, well, as always when you are exposing a write permission though the web, you are more or less vulnerable. This problem has and is still discussed within the indieweb community. A protocol, Vouch has been proposed to address this problem.

                                      And as mentioned below, you still can moderate or simply not display your webmentions altogether.

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                                        Webmentions have been modeled after pingback. They are basically a refinement.

                                        Did anyone ever care about pingbacks though? Even the non-spammy ones?

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                                          Presumably? I mean, they got implemented, right? Someone spent the time to make that happen.

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                                            Did anyone ever care about pingbacks though? Even the non-spammy ones?

                                            I can only speak for myself, but I did. It often gave me access to blogs by people with similar interests that I would have otherwise never known about to visit. It used to be that a large percentage of bloggers would list their favourite blogs somewhere on every page (sidebar/footer) so finding one blog with an author who shared similar interests could end up in a twenty five link binge.

                                            I guess it was a different time, then again it was over a decade ago.

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                                          I was wondering that, unless these aren’t intended to be published in verbose and instead used more as a notification for the author and only really published publicly as a counter?

                                          If the pingbacks had been used simply to list in the authors admin places where their articles had been mentioned and not published alongside comments to the article then there would have been a lot less spam.

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                                            Vouch was mentioned here already, but for now, just requiring a valid h-entry reply/like/repost/etc. instead of just a link works well enough. Of course spammers can start posting proper replies, but they haven’t yet.

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                                            Because I must’ve missed it if it was linked at all in the blog text, a link to the source for the GLB “director”: https://github.com/github/glb-director

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                                              It’s in the second-to-last paragraph which talks about our open sourcing it, but it does deserve a link in the first paragraph.

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                                              I love magit, but trying to use magit-log-* on a repository with more than half a million commits reeeeeeally drags on, so it’s magit for reasonable repos and plain git log --show-notes=* --abbrev-commit --pretty=format:'%Cred%h %Cgreen(%aD)%Creset -%C(bold red)%d%Creset %s %C(bold blue)<%an>%Creset' (aliased) for monorepos.

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                                                For folks like me who’ve been running the experimental Metal renderer for a while, I think this is the same one.

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                                                  I wasn’t on beta, so this is nice to know about!

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                                                  While I got the context that this is about GNOME, I’m not really sure what the author is talking about. Are their guidelines very complicated that make icons look terrible? How does that affect blender or other apps in screenshots? And how does detail become harmful there?

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                                                    Yep, I’m pretty lost wrt. what their actual contention is.

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                                                    Isn’t it great to be able to open a chat conversation with your virtual machine and say things like “How are you today?” or “Hey, please reboot”?

                                                    I have to admit, this sentence is extremely uncompelling.

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                                                      Dude chatting to a VM is amazing okay

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                                                        XD. I knwo that does sound stupid, but other than that the management interface is nice hence why I posted.

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                                                          Oh, it’s fine to post :D They could just sell it better, I think.

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                                                            Oh yes, of course. It really isn’t a good selling point :).

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                                                        The underlying factor that caused the github purchase to be a problem was that github was free. As long as the service is free, then selling out is always a risk.

                                                        Why not take the total server costs at the end of the month, divide by the number of users, and charge that as a monthly subscription to keep the lights on? If the system is even marginally profitable, that makes any kind of selling out (via acquisition or selling user data) less attractive.

                                                        If the system is costing the administrators money, then they have a high incentive to sell out.

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                                                          Why not take the total server costs at the end of the month, divide by the number of users, and charge that as a monthly subscription to keep the lights on?

                                                          Nah, charge them based on use like in mainframe and cloud models. That’s more fair. Safer, too, for the host. There probably should be a baseline fee that covers administrative overhead or at least contributes something to it. The usage charges go on top of that. There could be some usage that comes with the baseline fee, though.

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                                                            That’s an interesting point, and I’ll have to consider it. Though, I don’t see the user base growing enough to make selling out a possibility. My philosophy is that there should be many services like this one to prevent any one from growing too large and making selling out a possibility (that’s why the goal is to make everything open source - if someone wants to clone Asymptote they have my blessing).

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                                                              I don’t see the user base growing enough to make selling out a possibility.

                                                              I think the more likely case is it becomes too expensive and you don’t want to keep paying so the service shuts down and many users lose access to their email.

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                                                                You would be amazed how well a donation meter works.

                                                                Have a monthly goal of expenses + overhead. Show it on the homepage. Near the end of each month, if the goal isn’t met, nag the users a bit. Give those who donate some flair or something silly.

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                                                                  True. In that circumstance I would run a cheap ($2.50/mo) VPS to keep essential services running (such as email) while fundraising.

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                                                                Bingo! I’d like to see people putting their effort into distributed alternatives, in the same way that Peertube is an alternative to Youtube ans Mastodon to Twitter.

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                                                                  What is the fear with github being bought out? Is the prediction that there will now be ads on the site like source forge?

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                                                                    Asymptote’s existance isn’t because of fear of what Microsoft might do to GitHub. I made it to test out a midpoint between large, centralized services and everybody self-hosting. I don’t think Microsoft will screw up GitHub, it’s just that the discussion around the purchase prompted this idea.

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                                                                      There are many concerns but one obvious one is that they will integrate it with LinkedIn. Software is one of the only professions where you can still find a job without a LinkedIn; M$ will do what they can to change this.

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                                                                      We can just make sure that the admins publish inappropriate stuff like ‘women are weaker then men’ or ‘women make less money because they make different choices compared to men’ on its blog every month. Then the site would be ‘unbuyable’ because of the outvogue apparent social position of the owners. The people in the know would know to ignore such posts, but the bad-headline potential of these blogs would poison the site against any future buyouts.

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                                                                        This is a rather sarcastic way of making a reasonable point - what sorts of rules about host content will Asymptote Club (or other similar “middle-ground” services) enforce, and how resistant will it be to social/political pressure to censor content? What if I want to use Asymptote Club’s gitea/CI service to actively develop machine-learning software that’s illegal in some jurisdictions but not others? What if I want to use their matrix service to host a misogynist chatroom because I believe that the accusations that the content of the chatroom actually constitutes misogyny are complete bullshit? If something hosted on Asymptote Club got into the news and invokes a social media shitstorm against it, how much can I trust that Asymptote Club will keep hosting it, and how much do I have to know about the personal politics of zebMcCorkle in order to ascertain that?

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                                                                          Sad fact is that these things being published even in jest still provides fodder to people who do believe this stuff and want to feel justified in their opinions.

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                                                                        This link is more useful: https://blog.twitter.com/official/en_us/topics/company/2018/keeping-your-account-secure.html

                                                                        By all accounts, Twitter did the right thing here. They’ve owned up to it are advising people to change their passwords. They seem pretty open about the whole thing so far. This looks like an “honest bug.”

                                                                        @tptacek even agrees with Dan Kaminsky about it: https://twitter.com/tqbf/status/992202949018431491

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                                                                          I mean sure lets say it’s an honest bug. How was this even a possible bug?

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                                                                            lots of frameworks will go ahead and log the entire request params hash by default, and while many will automatically filter fields with “password” in the name, not all do! Who knows if this is it, but there are certainly a bunch of ways with infinite middleware layers, dozens of intermediary proxies handling request data, etc.

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                                                                              somebody accidentally left a log statement somewhere while testing something and it made it into a pull request would be my guess

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                                                                                I hope that they provide some insight into that.