1. 6

    Go is the most opinionated language I know and it can be fun if you adhere to them, otherwise things can get a bit hairy (e.g. developing outside the GOPATH). Following the language’s idioms is something you’ve to deal with when developing Go applications.

    1.  

      Developing outside GOPATH is currently worked on: https://research.swtch.com/vgo-intro

      1.  

        This is really nice to hear, currently I use a project-template with some Makefile and shell magic to simulate a custom GOPATH.

        1.  

          Great template! Thanks for sharing. Though, I hope vgo eventually becomes the official go tool and makes this unnecessary :-)

    1. 7

      3Blue1Brown, his mathematics explanations and visualizations (made with Blender btw) are fantastic.

      Two highlights:

      1. 4

        The essence of linear algebra video series of this YouTube channel was already mentioned in the comments.

      1. 2

        I’ve heard a great deal of buzz and praise for this editor. I’ve got a couple decades’ experience with my current editor – is it good enough to warrant considering a switch?

        1. 3

          What do you love about your current editor?

          What do you dislike about it?

          What are the things your editor needs to provide that you aren’t willing to compromise on?

          1. 2

            It probably isn’t, but it’s maybe worth playing around with, just to see how it compares. It’s definitely the best behaved Electron app I’ve ever seen. It doesn’t compete with the Emacs operating system configurations, but it does compete for things like Textmate, Sublime, and the other smaller code-editors. It has VI bindings(via a plugin) that’s actually pretty good(and can use neovim under the hood!). I still don’t understand Microsoft’s motivation for writing this thing, but it’s nice that they dedicate a talented team to it.

            It’s very much still a work in progress, but it’s definitely usable.

            1. 3

              Here’s the story of how it was created[1]. It’s a nice, technical interview. However, the most important thing about this editor is that it marked an interesting shift in Microsoft’s culture. It appears that is the single most widely used open source product originating by MS.

              https://changelog.com/podcast/277

              1. 1

                Thanks for linking that show up.

            2. 2

              It’s worth a try. It’s pretty good. I went from vim to vscode mostly due to windows support issues. I often switch between operating systems, so having a portable editor matters.

              1. 1

                It’s pretty decent editor to try it out. I’ve personally given up because it’s just too slow :| The only scenario in which I tolerate slowness, is a heavy-weight IDE (e.g., IntelliJ family). For simple editing I’d rather check out sublime (it’s not gratis, but it’s pretty fast).

                1. 1

                  It doesn’t have to be a hard switch, I for example switch between vim and vs-code depending on the language and task. And if there is some Java or Kotlin to code then I will use Intellij Idea, simply because it feels like the best tool for the job. See your text editors more like a tool in your toolbelt, you won’t drive in a screw with a hammer, won’t you? I see the text editors I use more like a tool in my toolbelt.

                  1. 1

                    I do a similar thing. I’ve found emacs unbearable for java (the best solution I’ve seen is eclim which literally runs eclipse in the background), so I use intellij for that.

                    For python, emacs isn’t quite as bad as it is with java, but I’ve found pycharm to be much better.

                    Emacs really wins out with pretty much anything else, especially C/++ and lisps.

                    1. 1

                      VS Code has a very nice python module (i.e. good autocomplete and debugger), the author of which has been hired by MS to work on it full time. Not quite PyCharm-level yet but worth checking out if you’re using Code for other stuff.

                1. 2

                  A common problem I see in trainings or the Hack & Learn is that presented with a lifetime problem, people start messing around with lifetime syntax.

                  This could have been me, I often tried the exact same thing that you pointed out. Thank you for writing this article!

                  1. 2

                    couldn’t you just do social activities in real life instead of using social media?

                    1. 4

                      I have a lot of interaction via social media (broadly defined, includes real-time chat) with people in other parts of the globe. Meeting them “IRL” is prohibitive in time and cost, yet we all derive value from the interaction online.

                      The same goes for people who I have met IRL and who are still in close physical proximity. Time constraints (read: kids) often makes meeting in real life hard to schedule. When we do plan to meet, social media takes out of the friction of planning and execution.

                      In fact, the main value FB brings to me is as as meeting and event organizing tool.

                      1. 4

                        I think this does not answer @dmonay’s original question and sounds a bit accusatory in the sense assuming that the author lacks real life social activities. Nonetheless, I think that social media is a big waste of time and a quick chat from person to person is worth more than thousand text messages. I also don’t like the trend that more and more people—at least in my social circle—try to communicate solely through instant messengers instead of giving a quick call. (Better to stop here before it goes even more offtopic.)

                        1. 3

                          Privacy focused social media just seemed like a huge oxymoron to me.

                          1. 3

                            Sort-of. If I share something privately at a small gathering and the details get out, I know it’s because somebody there talked. I can reason about that; I can ask my friends which of them did it. I can’t assume that about facebook etc.

                            1. 1

                              Let me reframe this in a way that will seem more obvious to you.

                              “Privacy focused communication just seemed like a huge oxymoron to me.”

                              1. 1

                                Never write a letter or destroy one if you care about secrets.

                          2. -1

                            They said on social media, ignorant of the irony of the statement.

                            1. 3

                              If you want privacy and dislike social media you can stop using it. Lobste.rs included. There is no irony because I am not suggesting staying on lobste.rs either.

                              1. 1

                                The fact that you are here implies you like social media. Nobody in here is talking about not liking social media, so who is your audience here?

                                1. 1

                                  The whole original post is someone grappling with wanting social interaction but hating being a cog in the online advertising machine. I’m just saying it might well be possible to opt out without being a hermit by trying other things (religion, sport, social clubs). To be honest, I often wonder if i do like social media or not, it clearly is addictive, and by some metrics it does not pay for itself.

                          1. 1

                            I use the same dotfiles for home and work where different configurations like the email address used in ~/.gitconfig are applied through a simple .patch file: https://github.com/klingtnet/dotfiles/blob/master/Makefile#L19

                            1. 16

                              Finally, yes, everyone knows LinkedIn is very frustrating in a lot of ways. Unfortunately, network effects have made them the de facto official professional networking tool of much of the world

                              Actually, I’ve quit all other mainstream social media except LinkedIn, and find it a pleasure to use. It’s like the sugar coated optimistic version of the world. There are very very few flamewars or socio-political rants, and people are in general more civil, professional, and upbeat.

                              Looking forward to meeting fellow crustaceans in this rose-colored virtual utopia.

                              1. 7

                                and find it a pleasure to use.

                                Interesting, I’ve experienced quite the opposite. Their UI was horrible and they required you to login to view messages you got from other users. Maybe my memory is off but I think they also advertised their premium features wherever they could. I am unsure what makes LinkedIn a pleasure to use or better than staying in touch with other professionals by email or some other form of communication.

                                UPDATE: I may confused them with Xing, which is the german LinkedIn equivalent. Nonetheless, I don’t like both services.

                                1. 15

                                  LinkedIn is also relentless with email marketing: I had to add a rule to block their marketing emails after two attempts to remove myself from their lists (I shouldn’t have been on their list to begin with, as I didn’t sign up). They are one of the worst offenders in this domain, it has to be said.

                                  In my short experience in tech, I haven’t had to use LinkedIn and haven’t been pressured to use it. That may be specific to the tech industry, but I am thankful for it.

                                2. 3

                                  There are very very few flamewars or socio-political rants, and people are in general more civil, professional, and upbeat.

                                  I find that barley surprising, considering what kind of a social network it is.

                                  1. 2

                                    It’s like the sugar coated optimistic version of the world.

                                    That’s what makes it a bit painful for me. Still, it’s good that there’s at least some corners in the world that are like that.

                                  1. 1

                                    I am also at the 34c3 if someone wants to say hello.

                                    1. -2

                                      Lesson #0: be dishonnest and steal a lot of money

                                      1. 2

                                        Can you clarify this statement, what are you referring to?

                                        1. 12

                                          I don’t know about blatantly stealing money, but Microsoft has a long history of doing sketchy things typical of big businesses in other industries, and fighting it out in court. Lots of anti-competitive stuff, especially taking advantage of their large Windows install base to fuck over other companies. Things like intentionally breaking compatibility with competing software.

                                          In his finding of facts for United States v. Microsoft, Judge Jackson determined that because of IBM’s marketing of Lotus SmartSuite, and other alternatives to Microsoft products (like World Book electronic encyclopedia instead of Microsoft’s Encarta[8]), Microsoft “punished the IBM PC Company with higher prices, a late license for Windows 95, and the withholding of technical and marketing support.”[9]

                                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Lotus_SmartSuite#cite_ref-8

                                          I don’t know how old you are but you might remember similar stuff happening with Netscape Navigator / Mozilla Firefox vs Internet Explorer in the late 90s.

                                          1. 3

                                            I refer to between other things to the secret contract that microsoft has with OEM which makes you can’t basically buy a PC without paying windows.

                                          2. 1

                                            I’ll add to your statement that the big firms with billions of dollars to change the world as they see fit got it through lots of dishonesty that wouldn’t fly in FOSS-driven organizations. So, the best way to get a lot done might be encouraging people to make piles of money by any means necessary to later make some improvements to the software or physical world. Even more true when one thinks about the effects of lobbying such as the recent purchase of the FCC by a handful of companies in private industry. ;)

                                            1. 1

                                              Basically you are making the classical justification of the means by the ends. Nothing new under the sun.

                                              1. 1

                                                Exactly. Best way to operate in capitalist systems if wanting to influence them heavily. Idealists mostly end up writing blog posts griping about what successful capitalists are doing. They might even get successful but not majorly influential. Any exceptions are extra rare.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Strongly disagree, the best way to operate in capitalist systems is to make their best sabotage it. Definetily it will work in the long run.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    This one in U.S. has had a long run. The capitalists have won most of the time. They also have people working nonstop in Congress and courts on their agenda with media distracting their opponents who act much less. The combo of legal activity plus media influence has given them more victories over time as their opponents argue among themselves over details of media’s viewpoints instead of fact it’s a plutocracy. The saboteurs’ small victories are often reversed later with ease like we saw with civil rights vs Patriot Act earlier with Wheeler and net neutrality recently.

                                                    Your recommendation has been failing. Whereas, new capitalists have shaken up older ones regularly. Older ones taking new directions after markets, individuals, and so on convince them to also did this. The best strategy in a system is the one that produces results. I don’t like the necessary evil approach but it’s what works. It’s not like they can’t otherwise do good as capitalists. They just need something generating massive flow of money to use to accomplish their goals.

                                            2. 1

                                              Gates turned out to be a real Robin Hood

                                              1. 2

                                                Robin Hood wouldn’t bring us a Windows Tax that robs the poor and rich alike. That includes many in desperate circumstances who might have escaped them if monopolies and oligopolies like Bill’s didn’t ensure they’d face higher-than-necessary cost of living plus barriers to escaping them. More like he robbed everyone from the poor to the rich to make a fortune he later started giving to poorer groups of people to solve some of their problems.

                                                1. 1

                                                  a robin hood who stole to the poor, it’s a shiny new concept.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    What kind of poverty includes a windows licence? Pre mobile phone era when he made his money poor people didn’t have computers, and generally didn’t deal with anyone who did. I think you’re imagining something very different to me when you speak of poverty.

                                                    Bill has personally given away over 28 billion usd, largely to help the poor (and reasonably effectively, too).

                                                    1. 1

                                                      poverty as in the second half of the population in any western country. For sure, the windows licence is not a problem for multimillionnaire companies.

                                                      If he was able to give 28 billion usd, it is because it take them to someone first.

                                                      You probably have some of classical robin hood behavior which is take to the poor to give to the poorest.

                                              1. 8

                                                I love this quote:

                                                A programmer does not primarily write code; rather, he primarily writes to another programmer about his problem solution.

                                                Edit: highlight

                                                1. 1

                                                  Whose comment is that at the top?

                                                  1. 1

                                                    The URL says /resources/text/Knuth_Don so I would assume that the comment is from Donald Knuth.

                                                  1. 24

                                                    If your score is above your post count you’re doing fantastic. I don’t think anyone in this community treats them as a popularity contest.

                                                    1. 7

                                                      I also don’t have the impression. There’s a couple of highly active users here, they have a lot of karma. I can also tell that by seeing their name all the time.

                                                      Personally, I rarely look up the total score of others and mostly look at mine as a generic “people took interest in my comments this week”. I don’t care that much about the long-term sum. But I do somewhat care about the uptake after investing much time in that platform.

                                                      I sometimes look up the average score of others, but only out of curiosity. That happens maybe once every three months.

                                                      It was a useful info for me though, when I was new to this community. Am I talking to a regular? A newbie? A lurker? This is all useful context.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        It was a useful info for me though, when I was new to this community. Am I talking to a regular? A newbie? A lurker? This is all useful context.

                                                        This is the important part for me. It would be fine to hide the specific score and only show a classification like “newbie”, “link poster”, “active commenter”, “senior” which might include more data like “age of account” and “rank”.

                                                      2. 2

                                                        This is actually a brilliant idea! I think showing the average would be way more helpful and would guide participants toward writing less, higher quality comments.

                                                        I think it’s way more useful:

                                                        If we consider that someone who has written 10 comments and has a score 100 adds much more to a debate than a user with 1000 comments and a score of 1000.

                                                        Currently the user with the better contributions looks worse than the person with the lower quality contributions.

                                                        1. 5

                                                          would guide participants toward writing less, higher quality comments.

                                                          That assumes the comment vote = quality. It really doesn’t. It means it’s what one or more people in that thread in that context wanted to see, what a pile didn’t, or something in between. The metrics are inconsistent. Many comments with info in them also get either no votes or just one. There’s also whether it’s a hot-button topic where taking a certain position always gets a vote boost.

                                                          There’s enough problems connecting comment votes to any objective metric of quality that I don’t use averages for it. I have a guess that it’s probably OK if over 2. People’s responses to individual comments or private messages have been more reliable indicator for me.

                                                          1. 4

                                                            I think showing the average would be way more helpful and would guide participants toward writing less, higher quality comments.

                                                            I don’t think so, a high average score often only shows who’s expressing popular opinions because they receive a lot of upvotes.

                                                            edit: s/get/receive

                                                          2. 1

                                                            Thanks for the reply. I will meditate on that.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            A small bit below Exceptional, i.e. hours are flexible but I’m working ≥ 40 h/week. I am not forced to work more than 40 hours a week—in fact the working hours are based on mutual trust—but sometimes I voluntarily do overtime if there is a particularily interesting problem to solve.

                                                            1. 9

                                                              Firefox is now (and since some nightly versions ago) faster and a lot more resource friendly than chrome for me. But, I am surprised that neither Firefox nor Chrome support hardware accelerated video decoding under Linux and it’s quite surprising to me that nobody mentioned it because this is the number one battery killer for me. Are there any plans to support VAAPI in upcomming Firefox versions?

                                                              edit: typos fixed.

                                                              1. 4

                                                                One thing that really miffs me about Firefox (that I’m being reminded of right now) is that Ctrl-q closes the entire browser. Seems great, until you remember that Ctrl-w closes tabs and if you accidentally fat-finger (or just miss) the key, you lose your entire session.

                                                                I’ve looked at some “disable ctrl-q behavior” and “remap keys” extensions but none of them seem to work with this newest version (even though they’re supported). Has anyone found a workaround?

                                                                1. 13

                                                                  Just type Dvorak, and then Q and W are on opposite sides of the keyboard! Problem solved! /s

                                                                  1. 6

                                                                    Set browser.tabs.warnOnClose = true, browser.showQuitWarning = true and DO NOT SET “Show my windows and tabs from last time”. There is a WebExtension for this but it only works on Mac (o_0)

                                                                    Fat-fingering Ctrl-W? meh. I have Ctrl-Q set as my tmux shortcut key! Imagine how many times I press it into the wrong window :D

                                                                    1. 5

                                                                      DO NOT SET “Show my windows and tabs from last time”.

                                                                      unacceptable

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        It’s not going to, like, actually lose your tabs.

                                                                        Ctrl-Q shows a popup with “Save and Quit”. Crash/kill -9/power plug pulling/… – the “do you want to restore session” screen.

                                                                    2. 3

                                                                      I know the flexibility of extensions to change key bindings according to user preferences is greatly diminished with webextensions; I’ve had to route around this problem at the OS layer instead of inside FF: https://technomancy.us/184

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        If you’re running Gnome you can create a custom keyboard shortcut for Ctrl+Q with an empty action to disable it (in all applications).

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          The “Disable Ctrl-Q and Cmd-Q” add-on works for me. I’m sitting here mashing Ctrl-Q and nothing is happening.

                                                                          edit: ah, https://bugzil.la/1325692 may be related if you’re on Linux. Sorry :/

                                                                        1. 4

                                                                          I haven’t seen most/all of the talks but I can already recommend this (Mistakes to avoid when writing a wrapper around a C library) to everyone who plans or has written a C library wrapper in Rust.

                                                                          1. 6

                                                                            I recently switched from gogs to gitea because it is more actively developed (releases are more frequent) and it is more community driven. For gogs new versions could only be released by the respository owner and the same goes for merging pull requests IIRC, which in turn was the reason to fork gitea from gogs. I am running a gitea instance together with Drone CI to get a complete CI pipeline. Drone is not restricted to gitea and can be used with a variety of other git hosting services and it only consists of two Go binaries so the deployment is a breeze. You can find my setup for both services in this repository if you are interested.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              Yeah, I kind of feel as if this article missed the mark a bit. While, at the moment, the feature differences of Gitea and Gogs are fairly minimal (I honestly think the only meaningful one is that Gitea can (optionally!) ship as a single binary with assets embedded), the development workflow is radically different, and that has genuine user impact. As you pointed out, Gitea ships more often; as an admin, that’s meant in practice that I’m less likely to have a security issue or feature regression with Gitea that requires me to do a custom build. The bus factor is also key here: if Unknown got bored, then yeah, Gogs would probably continue, but they’d have to build a new developer workflow, and there’d probably be a fork fight. Gitea’s community seems sane and has demonstrated effectiveness at shipping on a regular schedule, which makes me feel much more confident.

                                                                              I remember, with Gogs, having a patch of mine just sit for months because Unknown was just out somewhere. (In fact, this absence might’ve been what caused Gitea to fork; I forget.) Yeah, the PR backlog’s longer than I’d like, but they make steady, consistent progress on it. I don’t worry about a PR going nowhere.

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                at the moment, the feature differences of Gitea and Gogs are fairly minimal …

                                                                                Gitea has implemented a lot of new features in 1.2.0, e.g. support for (GPG) signed commits, so they now differ quite a bit featurewise. Unfortunately, there is no up-to-date comparison between both.

                                                                            1. [Comment removed by author]

                                                                              1. 34

                                                                                I fully agree with you on this. The best moderation is moderation no one notices. I read the original comment and it started a valid dialogue. It wasn’t hateful, it was an obvious joke about not being a fan of electron.

                                                                                @pushcx you are power tripping in removing comments alone, but your attitude after the fact is just unbelievable. I’ve been part of this community for years now and you’re making me rethink that now after just a week. I don’t have any interest in contributing or being part of this community if that’s how you want to run it.

                                                                                Edit: who downvoted this as “troll” and why?

                                                                                1. 0

                                                                                  Edit: who downvoted this as “troll” and why?

                                                                                  Some people still use downvotes as a form of protest. I recently had an “incorrect” downvote on a simple piece of info directly from the Go documentation: https://lobste.rs/s/nvfu1o/implementing_gos_defer_keyword_c#c_xkzj1u

                                                                                2. 7

                                                                                  @pushcx needs to step back

                                                                                  That’s a bit harsh, don’t you think? However, I do share your view that moderators should not shape the discourse instead anyone should be able to decide for himself what a hate/unacceptable/whatever post or comment is and what not.

                                                                                  1. 0

                                                                                    -1 incorrect, -1 troll

                                                                                    Ok, I can accept the incorrect flag but troll, really? Can someone please explain why my comment was flagged as trolling?

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      I had 2 troll downvotes on my response to this. Maybe they’re trying to self-identify?

                                                                                  2. 5

                                                                                    I’d like to see @pushcx step down for a few months and wait to be democratically elected (supported?) to return to a moderator position.

                                                                                    1. 8

                                                                                      Does this mean we’d have to form some kind of committee? How do we determine who gets to vote and how that vote takes place?

                                                                                      From discussions on IRC, and @pushcx’s comments in this thread, the deletion of the whole thead was unintentional and recovery of those comments may be difficult. This is clearly a mistake, but one that I feel is understandable and forgivable.

                                                                                      As for the deletion of the comment intended, that may also be a mistake, but one with deeper consequences. I, for one, thought the “hate post” was a low value comment that didn’t need to be made in the first place. I am indifferent to it being there at all and probably would downvote it if was still there. The fact that it’s gone doesn’t bother me. The only thing that gives me pause is that it was deleted since this is the first time something like this has happened here, to my knowledge.

                                                                                      My personal view is that pushcx jumped the gun, but I don’t want it to be a regular occurrence, but on the other hand, it’s consistent with his previous views on moderation, as I recall. I’d prefer a less heavy handed approach, where the moderator can hide the post, the post indicates that it’s been moderated, and you have to click through to see it.

                                                                                      On the other hand, I agree with pushcx in that I don’t want to see more “hate posts” because I don’t think they help the community.

                                                                                      1. 6

                                                                                        I would like this too. I think it is a good compromise. I loathe comments like the one in question, and would love to see less of them.

                                                                                      2. 1

                                                                                        Maybe just let people elect whether mods should be able to delete comments for arbitrary reasons? I’m just as crazy about this as you seem to be (which is to say not at all), but @pushcx has put a lot of work in and I’d hate to see that all put on hold for three months just because of one misstep.

                                                                                      3. -5

                                                                                        If you don’t like moderators, usenet is still up. Godspeed.

                                                                                        EDIT: A less grumpy response is that every active community has moderation, and with good reason. The places that have little to no moderation like Usenet and 4chan are very, very different culturally. And not in a good way, in my opinion.

                                                                                        1. 27

                                                                                          who had 8 days in the post-migration death pool?

                                                                                          EDIT: since we’re getting less grumpy ;)

                                                                                          We’ve been running under new management for eight days. The previous comment-killing moderations were, in reverse-chronological order:

                                                                                          • as the site was finding feet
                                                                                          • to correct an obvious issue
                                                                                          • “language” - not sure what that one is.

                                                                                          People are going to be rightfully nervous when they perceive a change in the tone of moderation. Especially when the comment in question was maybe trolly but definitely not anything excessive.

                                                                                          1. 15

                                                                                            I don’t think “no moderation” is even a meaningful concept. As detailed at length in the classic essay The Tyranny of Structurelessness, when the people who provide a community with its venue decline to get involved in questions about what kind of community it is, other people step in to do that. I’m sure you can think of the same people offhand who’ve been doing that here as I can. :)

                                                                                            1. [Comment removed by author]

                                                                                              1. 10

                                                                                                I agree with that. I’m sure that we differ on details, but I want the process to be transparent and clear.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  Could you please link to some successful communities that rely on a democratic moderation process and limit moderators limited to spam/dmca?

                                                                                                  1. 12

                                                                                                    Most of the good mailing lists I’m on are sort-of like that, though it depends on what you mean by “democratic”. For technical reasons moderators obviously don’t delete messages on mailing lists, and interventions on the ones I’m on are usually limited to banning users who repeatedly refuse to follow community norms, plus occasionally gently intervening in wildly off-topic threads to suggest maybe they could be taken offlist. Usually by the time someone’s banned there’s a pretty good consensus that most of the people want them gone, so the moderator is in a sense just carrying out the prevailing view, though it’s not democratic in a formal sense like there being votes or anything. (I do think up/downvotes are not a great mechanism.)

                                                                                              2. 8

                                                                                                shots fired

                                                                                                edit: fair enough, but there are shades of moderation level, usenet and 4chan haven’t really moderation from the userbase, while lobsters has and it should be favored over moderation from admins.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  lobste.rs has moderated invites, to me this implies that we don’t need internal moderation except for spam, etc.

                                                                                                2. 3

                                                                                                  The USENET group alt.hackers is unique in that it’s a moderated group, but with no moderator, which was the whole point. It was a fun exercise in learning how to post there, and the signal-to-noise ratio was quite good for a moderatorless moderated group.

                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                    If you don’t like moderators, usenet is still up. Godspeed.

                                                                                                    Okay. That made me laugh.

                                                                                                    But fwiw, I don’t agree with aggressive moderation. If we some how reach reddit-level brigading and shit posting then it might be appropriate.

                                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                                      It might have been funny, but more importantly it was mean. I consider it a mistake. It deserved every downvote and I’m only not deleting it because it’s better off visible as the part of an important meta conversation.

                                                                                                1. 13

                                                                                                  Some interesting changes, from: https://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/1710

                                                                                                  “The biggest change is the desktop environment. Ubuntu 17.10 is retiring Unity in favour of GNOME, version 3.26.1.”

                                                                                                  “Ubuntu 17.10 features the Linux kernel 4.13.”

                                                                                                  “The swap is now a file, not a partition that will scale to what your system needs, making it easier to install Ubuntu on any machine.”

                                                                                                  “Ubuntu 17.10 will be supported for 9 months until July 2018. If you need Long Term Support, it is recommended you use Ubuntu 16.04 LTS instead.”

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    “The swap is now a file, not a partition that will scale to what your system needs, making it easier to install Ubuntu on any machine.”

                                                                                                    Huh. I vaguely remember something about systems that supported swap files tearing support out. As I recall, it was because it was deadlock prone. The file system may need to allocate in the write path, which triggers swapping, which needs to write, which triggers allocations, which triggers swapping, which needs to write… you get the idea.

                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                      Windows swaps to a file on NTFS just fine…

                                                                                                      It must’ve been about ZFS. Swapping to a file on ZFS or a zvol WILL deadlock :)

                                                                                                    2. 2

                                                                                                      “The swap is now a file, not a partition that will scale to what your system needs, making it easier to install Ubuntu on any machine.”

                                                                                                      Would there be any issues with doing this as opposed to keeping your swap on a separate partition? Is the only upside ease of installation for those unfamiliar with disk partitioning?

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                                                                                                        There’s potentially a very slight performance difference, but it would be tiny. It’s far outweighed by the benefits at installation time. Depending on how they’re doing it (I haven’t looked in depth), it would also simplify the handling of encrypted swap (that is, they wouldn’t have to do it anymore; if the root filesystem is on an encrypted partition, encrypted swap comes for free).

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                                                                                                          The only downside of a swap file for me is that it makes hibernation a bit more complicated because you must specify the offset of the file from the partition start as a kernel parameter. But this is only a minor issue and I haven’t used a dedicated swap partition in years.

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                                                                                                            I hadn’t thought about hibernation…but then again, I gave up trying to get it working on any OS ten years ago and haven’t thought about it since. :)

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                                                                                                          I’d be surprised; keeping swap in a file has been supported for well over a decade (could be two or even three, I’m not a historian).

                                                                                                          I’m very familiar with disk partitioning, but I’m also very happy not to have to do it! And swap is a pretty safe thing to put on even your root partition, as it’s fixed-size and won’t surprise you by filling your disk.

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                                                                                                          I actually had an issue with my swap on the last 17.10 beta. There existed a /swapfile, and it was listed in /etc/fstab, but for some reason it was not being used (swapon -s and top didn’t show it). A couple of times when I opened a few Chrome tabs in a row, the machine went south, and as far as I could tell kswapd was going nuts. Both times the machine hung.

                                                                                                          I blasted the old /swapfile, made a new one in the usual way, activated it, and now the machine is running fine.

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                                                                                                          First, nobody forces anyone to buy a macbook. (I don’t want to rant). I can recommend Thinkpad keyboards, especially the one of my X1 Carbon 5h. Gen, except that you then have to deal with HiDPI on Linux which is no fun. Second, the website is not made for fast scrolling, it looks totally broken if I scroll to the bottom of the page, possibly because of some fancy lazy loading.

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                                                                                                            except that you then have to deal with HiDPI on Linux which is no fun

                                                                                                            But it is currently improving very quickly. I am running the latest stable GNOME on Wayland on Arch with 2x scaling (fractional scaling is still experimental) and most stuff seems to work now. I am using a MacBook Pro most of the day, but Linux has really gone from years behind to close enough to be usable in just a year.

                                                                                                            (I hear that X.org is a different story altogether, no different scaling for different displays.)

                                                                                                            Second, the website is not made for fast scrolling, it looks totally broken if I scroll to the bottom of the page, possibly because of some fancy lazy loading.

                                                                                                            And the moving wrinkles are as annoying as the <blink> tag.

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                                                                                                              HiDPI worked ok on Xorg at least two years ago, at least until you plugged in a low-DPI screen, because it could not run them in different modes.

                                                                                                              And I quite dislike the 2x scaling. In 1x everything is too small, in 2x everything is way too large. I ended setting GNOME to 1x and Firefox to scale 1.6x which worked ok.

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                                                                                                                latest stable GNOME on Wayland on Arch

                                                                                                                I’m experiencing quite the opposite, in fact I switched to Cinnamon until this scaling issue is fixed.

                                                                                                                Everything is fine unless you use two displays with different scaling (even when you use only one of them). Say for example you have an external monitor with normal DPI and a HiDPI laptop display then the window borders/icons and probably something else is scaled two times on the external display even when the laptop lid is closed, ignoring the scaling factor which is set.

                                                                                                                I hear that X.org is a different story altogether, no different scaling for different displays

                                                                                                                Yes, this feature will only be available for Wayland.

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                                                                                                                  Did Cinnamon fix that problem for you?
                                                                                                                  I use Cinnamon and still have that issue, but it’s entirely possible I am just missing something.

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                                                                                                                    Not entirely, i.e. it can’t scale each display differently but the window borders respect the scaling factor in contrast to Gnome where they follow the scaling of the highest DPI screen (even when it is turned off).

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                                                                                                                  idk about different scaling for different displays, but I have one single 1.5x scale (4K) display, and just adding Xft.dpi: 144 to ~/.Xresources made everything look pretty much perfect in Xorg.

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                                                                                                                  just got the 5th gen x1c (wqhd) and am very happy with it. I disabled scaling though and use i3. Some stuff still seems messed up (vlc is HUGE, i don’t know if it’s still scaling or the scaling factor reset on reboot or something).

                                                                                                                  I just increase the font size on firefox and in the terminal and feel fine without scaling.