1. 2

    My only realistic hope this year is local conferences, feels like, so I might attend ApacheCon in September. I initially wanted to do Gophercon Iceland, but that’s not happening (my going there I mean)

    1. 1

      I am happy to hear that there is a european GopherCon in Iceland!

    1. 4

      Not very helpful non-answer incoming, more like a “me too” ’;)

      My go-to conference every year (since 2013, with a break) is FOSDEM, so I’m planning this for 2019.

      I went to PolyConf in 2017 and loved it, but apparently it’s not happening this year :( (still hoping, maybe in the late fall?)

      So I’m also a bit unsure if there’s something interesting for me, I’m not doing PHP anymore (the Unconference in Hamburg was alwyas excellent) and I’m not doing Go anymore…

      Chaos Communication Congress would be nice, but I’ve no time for it this year.

      1. 1

        I totally forgot about FOSDEM, what a great conference for open source software. But I was not too happy with the technical infrastructure of the ULB in Brussels, often microphones didn’t work or the beamer resolution was to small to make meaningful demos. This is the reason I did not went there this year but I will give it a second chance in 2019.

        1. 1

          I enjoyed PolyConf 17 as well. Especially as it was the beginning of a Paris vacation for me.

        1. 17

          Knowing german, I read this way differently than the title is trying to convey initially.

          1. 8

            For the non-german folks here, du is the german personal-pronoun for you so the title reads: Like you but more intuitive :)

            1. 2

              It’s a bit more complex than that: German retained the T-V distinction, which means it has two forms of singular second person pronoun, one for people you’re close to and one for people you’re not close to. Sie is the pronoun for people you’re not close to, du is the one for people you are close to. It also has two forms of the second-person plural pronoun, ihr for people you’re close to and, again, Sie for people you’re not close to.

              1. 2

                Still it translates to the same and I don’t know of any way to preserve that intent in English.

                I always thought the du/Sie distinction makes German very formal but it also seems very ingrained in the culture. The distinction was also in Swedish but it disappeared and is so rare in Denmark I can’t remember when I saw it last. Something I couldn’t imagine happening in Germany.

                1. 3

                  Sweden is such a small country that a reform of this type, made in the heady days of the 60s, got traction very easily.

                  As a bank cashier in the late 80s I’d sometimes refer to customers using “ni” and occasionally get pushback from people of the “68 generation”.

            2. 5

              Also “dust” means dork or idiot in Norwegian.

              1. 1

                This app was previously called kuler and I used it often in the past where I still had time to do some graphics design.

                1. 1

                  I wrote my own, though not as fancy

                1. -1

                  All that time I’m studying diversity and inclusion is time I’m not shipping a product.

                  1. 7

                    If you need to spend 40 hours just to treat your peers as peers you will never ever be successful. Cooperation and mutual gain is the foundation of success. You’re going to waste so much time butting heads that you’re never going to get anything shipped.

                    If you are a startup founder I highly recommend 37 Signal’s rework. He cuts through a lot of the cargo culting of larger corporations in startup culture and gets to evidence based strategies.

                    https://basecamp.com/books/rework

                    1. 2

                      I’m not sure if your comment agrees with mine or not.

                      In any case, I have brought more women into tech than men, but not as part of any political crusade. I just happen to hang out with women more. Sadly, some of these women have decided tech is not for them because they don’t want to deal with the people who spend most of their time talking about diversity.

                      I have worked with and still work with brilliant women, and we do great work together. It really is as simple as that. Or perhaps I live on a different planet. Who knows.

                      Edit: I’ve shipped products alone and in teams. And I have a copy of Rework, and I’ve read it (and thoroughly enjoyed it) twice — it’s not particularly long. None of this is going to change my position.

                      Edit 2: The motivation for my original terse and provocative comment was the author’s list of 10 ways to become a 10x developer. I think the list is largely nonsense, but that absolutely isn’t to say I disagree with all of the points. Most of them are common sense and generally adhered to by decent people. Some of the points however veer into typical SJW territory of quotas and affirmative action, which I strongly reject as a left-leaning liberal.

                      1. 2

                        Again, if you need to spend 40 hours a week for the indefinite future to educate yourself on diversity, inclusivity and equality you have no place running a business. If women are leaving your business because you’re talking so much about diversity then stop doing lip service.

                        1. 2

                          If women are leaving your business

                          …But, they aren’t?

                          I said I know women who have left tech after having to deal with people who are only interested in talking about diversity. This has happened after I sent these women to events like RailsGirls and similar.

                          Please try reading more carefuly.

                          1. 1

                            In my defense it was a particularly ambiguous line. The main thing I viewed as dangerous was not being willing to investigate or understand diversity or inclusion. I’ll admit part of this might be a misunderstanding as a result of where we live? We don’t really have the same intense everything about diversity environment where I am. Instead it’s usually a token statement with not much action behind it. Most workplaces around where I am have a stark wage gap between men and women. The root problem is that when you don’t have solidarity with minorities or other traditionally oppressed groups, it can basically be used as a wedge to drive all wages and labor rights down.

                            Being said yeah I don’t carte blanche accept everything the author wrote either.

                            Edit: I don’t see anywhere in the article where it talks about quotas…

                            1. 1

                              I understand. And in that case, I think we mostly agree with one another. Your comment about location is pertinent too; the social climate in the US is nothing like what it is in, e.g. Sweden or Poland. I’m not sure this is understood by everyone.

                              The article didn’t explicitly mention quotas, but at least in my experience I believe point #10 is a euphimism for just that.

                              1. 3

                                Yeah that’s fair. As I’ve said in response to klingtnet too recently I’ve literally had to defend even having a discussion about bigoted terms on this site. There’s a sort of identity conflict going on that seems to be distracting from the root of using solidarity as our primary way of relating. When you see some demographic being attacked you speak up, not because you support them, but to create a herd immunity. There are those who seek to divide up the public in some faint hopes of being on top. In reality any group seeking to divide the public will themselves be divided and controlled.

                      2. 1

                        I think @jgt’s comment was sarcasm.

                        1. 4

                          I frankly can’t tell anymore. It seems like lobsters has recently gotten an influx of individuals who are arbitrarily hostile to random demographics. I’ve recently been butting heads with people who seem to think that any sentiment against hostility or towards civility is somehow going to ruin their lives. Not saying jgt is that kind of person but the interactions with various others prior have definitely made me more defensive.

                          1. 2
                            1. 1

                              No, my position on this has not changed. I still think the original article is mostly political propaganda. As I clarified in an earlier comment, I believe the author is using a euphimism for affirmative action — a concept which in my experience has increased polarity, and in some cases even driven women away from our industry.

                              The women I work with explicitly do not want to be treated differently. They do not want to be thought of as “woman programmers”. They are programmers. They do not want handouts. They want equal respect as peers, which is of course what they deserve. Affirmative action is not equal; it’s a handout.

                              I am surprised I have to explain this to you, and I’m even more surprised that the Lobsters community is cool with a user nonchalantly calling another user an asshole.

                              I have some choice terms for you, but I’ll keep them to myself.

                              1. 1

                                Uhm, sorry it wasn’t clear, but I wasn’t calling you an asshole. The comment I’m replying to explicitly says:

                                Not saying jgt is that kind of person but the interactions with various others prior have definitely made me more defensive.

                                I simply linked to a concise term for the behavior voronoipotato was describing.

                          2. 2

                            I’ll concede that there is always some sarcasm [a personal weakness of mine] when I touch on this issue. That’s because it’s important, and it affects some people dear to me. Do I want a more diverse industry? Of course! I just don’t believe that all of the most vocal diversity advocates are going the right way about it, for the reasons explained in some of my previous comments.

                            1. 2

                              I’d appreciate it if you were more clear with your sarcasm in the future so that I won’t be tilting at windmills. I personally am fond of the “ :V “ face to denote jokes/sarcasm. There are people (I grew up with) who still think that a woman’s role is only to take care of the home. They aren’t old, they’re like 27. So for many there is still a discussion being had about whether this is even a problem we want to solve.

                      1. 11
                        1. Create an environment of psychological safety
                        2. Encourage everyone to participate equally
                        3. Assign credit accurately and generously
                        4. Amplify unheard voices in meetings
                        5. Give constructive, actionable feedback and avoid personal criticism
                        6. Hold yourself and others accountable
                        7. Cultivate excellence in an area that is valuable to the team
                        8. Educate yourself about diversity, inclusivity, and equality in the workplace
                        9. Maintain a growth mindset
                        10. Advocate for companies policies that increase workplace equality

                        Not a single point about the technical part of being a developer, e.g. giving workshops, trainings, talks etc. to share knowledge or even how to increase your development skill effectively. Nonetheless, if you follow this list you will probably be a better teammate but I don’t think it will make you a better developer.

                        1. 4

                          it’s a gotcha title. We should probably change to be “how to be a 10x teammate” or add a comment that illuminates that its about the counter-intuitive notion that being an effective teammate can cause more work to be done more quickly.

                        1. 3

                          I tried Duplicity with GPG but sadly I found it lacking, even for rarely looked at archives. I eventually moved to restic and it works splendidly.

                          1. 3

                            I also do backups using restic against a cloud storage (in my case a Ceph cluster), this has two advantages:

                            1. backups are stored redundantly
                            2. restic backups against an HTTP endpoint are much faster than over SSH
                            1. 2

                              My biggest complaints about restic are the lack of access controls and slow pruning of data. Perhaps those may be fixed one day.

                              1. 2

                                What were you missing from duplicity?

                                1. 5

                                  Not the OP, but the fact that you can’t delete intermediate incremental backups is pretty bad… Pruning is a pretty key aspect of most backup strategies (as I want daily going back N days, weekly going back N weeks, monthly going back N months, etc). Also, duplicity would run out of memory for me (but restic would too – I eventually settled on the free-to-use-but-not-free-software duplicacy, as I wrote about https://dbp.io/essays/2018-01-01-home-backups.html – some more details about the OOM stuff on the lobsters thread https://lobste.rs/s/pee9vl/cheap_home_backups )

                                  1. 3

                                    For one, being able to restore single files without scanning through the archive. The duplicity guys do know about the problems with using tar, but I don’t know when they’ll be able to move away from it.

                                    1. 3

                                      Are you sure this is not possible with using –file-to-restore ?

                                      1. 2

                                        I’m not 100% sure, I’m just going by my limited knowledge of the tar format and what my link says:

                                        Not seek()able inside container: Because tar does not support encryption/compression on the inside of archives, tarballs nowadays are usually post-processed with gzip or similar. However, once compressed, the tar archive becomes opaque, and it is impossible to seek around inside. Thus if you want to extract the last file in a huge .tar.gz or .tar.gpg archive, it is necessary to read through all the prior data in the archive and discard it!

                                        My guess is that –file-to-restore has to search for the file in the .tar.gz. If you find otherwise, I’d be interested to know!

                                1. 4

                                  If I move off of OS X, it will be to Windows. For what I use my machine for, the applications simply aren’t there on any Unix other than OS X.

                                  1. 4

                                    I’ve been using Linux as my main desktop since about 3 years and used all of the major desktop environments. KDE Plasma looks good but either its file indexer (baloo) is taking hostage of one CPU core or the desktop crashes if you type specific words or too fast in the launcher, in short a horrible experience. I used Gnome for about a year and it was not much better, the plugins/extensions are often buggy and especially under wayland it crashes often and can’t restart like on X11, i.e. you loose all of your session state. Additionally, it feels laggy even on a beefed out machine (6 cores, latest gen. AMD GPU) because the compositor is single-threaded. GDM, gnome’s display manager, is also sluggish, runs since gnome 3.26 a process for each settings menu and starts a pulseaudio session which breaks bluetooth headset connections. Also unsuable for a productive environment in my opinion. Eventually I switched back to the desktop environment with what I started my Linux journey, namely XFCE with lightdm as a display manager. With compton as compositor it looks quite okay, is rock solid (in relation to the other DE I used) and everything feels snappy. As a note, I run all of the DEs on Arch Linux and I haven’t even talked about display scaling and multi-monitor usage, still a horror story.

                                    TL;DR The year of the Linux desktop is still far away in the future.

                                    1. 5

                                      I wouldn’t really know where to go. I have an Arch desktop at home (quad Xeon, 24 GB RAM, 2 SSDs), while the machine is much faster than my MacBook Pro, I usually end up using the MacBook Pro at home (and always at work), simply because there are no equivalents for me for applications like OmniGraffle, Pixelmator/Acorn, Microsoft Office (project proposals are usually floated in Word/Excel format with track changes), Beamer, etc. Also, both at work and home, AirPlay is the standard way to get things on large screens, etc.

                                      Also, despite what people are saying. The Linux desktop is still very buggy. E.g. I use GNOME on Wayland with the open amdgpu drivers on Arch (on X I can’t drive two screens with different DPIs). And half of the time GNOME does not even recover from simple things like switching the screen on/off (the display server crashes, HiDPI applications become blurry, or application windows simply disappear).

                                      Windows would probably have more useful applications for me than Linux or BSD (since many open source applications run fine on WSL). But my brain is just fundamentally incompatible with any non-unix.

                                      1. 8

                                        Linux has been my main desktop for 20 years or so? Although I am a software developer and either do not need the applications you mentioned or use alternatives.

                                        Anyway, what I actually wanted to say: on the hardware side I’ve had little issues with Linux, certainly not more than with Windows or OS X and at least with Linux (if I put the time into it) the issues can generally be fixed. I’ve been running multiple monitors for years and hibernation used to be a pain in the ass in the early 2000’s but has been good for me on a wide array of hardware for years (definitely better than both Windows and OS X which run on supported hardware!). Granted, I can’t blindly grab hardware off the shelf and have to do some research up front on supported hardware. But that’s what you get if hardware vendors do not officially support your OS and it does come with many upsides as well.

                                        I run pretty bare systems though and try to avoid Window’isms that bring short-term convenience but also bring additional complexity, so no systemd, pulseaudio, desktop environments like Gnome for me. Still, I’m running Linux because I want to be able to run Dropbox (actually pCloud in my case), Steam, etc.

                                        1. 4

                                          Linux has been my main desktop for 20 years or so?

                                          Different people, different requirements. I have used Linux and BSD on the desktop from 1994-2007. I work in a group where almost everybody uses Macs. I work in a university where most of the paperwork is done in Word (or PDF for some forms). I have a fair teaching load, so I could mess around for two hours to get a figure right in TikZ (which I sometimes do if I think it is worth the investment and have the time) or I could do it in five minutes in OmniGraffle and have more time to do research.

                                          It’s a set of trade-offs. Using a Mac saves a lot of time and reduces friction in my environment. In addition, one can pretty run much the same open source applications as on Linux per Homebrew.

                                          I do use Linux remotely every day, for deep learning and data processing, since it’s not possible to get a reasonable Mac to do that work.

                                          Anyway, what I actually wanted to say: on the hardware side I’ve had little issues with Linux, certainly not more than with Windows or OS X and at least with Linux (if I put the time into it) the issues can generally be fixed.

                                          The following anecdote is not data, but as a lecturer I see a lot of student presentations. Relatively frequently, students who run Linux on their laptops have problems getting projectors working with their laptops, often ending up borrowing a laptop from one of their colleagues. Whereas the Mac-wielding students often forget their {Mini DisplayPort, USB-C} -> VGA connectors, but have no problems otherwise.

                                      2. 2

                                        Same. I don’t use them every day, but I do need Adobe CS. I also want (from my desktop) solid support for many, many pixels of display output. Across multiple panels. And for this, Windows tends to be better than Mac these days.

                                        1. 1

                                          The Windows Linux Subsystem is also surprisingly good. I would say that it offers just enough for most OS X users to be happy. Linux users, maybe not.

                                        2. 1

                                          One thing I’m finding is that a lot of Mac apps I rely on have increasingly capable iOS counterparts (Things, OmniOutliner, Reeder, etc.) so I could potentially get away with not having desktop versions of those. That gets me closer to cutting my dependency on macOS, though there’s still a few apps that keep me around (Sketch, Pixelmator) and the ever-present requirement of having access to Xcode for iOS development.

                                        1. 8

                                          Go is the most opinionated language I know and it can be fun if you adhere to them, otherwise things can get a bit hairy (e.g. developing outside the GOPATH). Following the language’s idioms is something you’ve to deal with when developing Go applications.

                                          1. 4

                                            Developing outside GOPATH is currently worked on: https://research.swtch.com/vgo-intro

                                            1. 2

                                              This is really nice to hear, currently I use a project-template with some Makefile and shell magic to simulate a custom GOPATH.

                                              1. 1

                                                Great template! Thanks for sharing. Though, I hope vgo eventually becomes the official go tool and makes this unnecessary :-)

                                          1. 7

                                            3Blue1Brown, his mathematics explanations and visualizations (made with Blender btw) are fantastic.

                                            Two highlights:

                                            1. 4

                                              The essence of linear algebra video series of this YouTube channel was already mentioned in the comments.

                                            1. 2

                                              I’ve heard a great deal of buzz and praise for this editor. I’ve got a couple decades’ experience with my current editor – is it good enough to warrant considering a switch?

                                              1. 3

                                                What do you love about your current editor?

                                                What do you dislike about it?

                                                What are the things your editor needs to provide that you aren’t willing to compromise on?

                                                1. 2

                                                  It probably isn’t, but it’s maybe worth playing around with, just to see how it compares. It’s definitely the best behaved Electron app I’ve ever seen. It doesn’t compete with the Emacs operating system configurations, but it does compete for things like Textmate, Sublime, and the other smaller code-editors. It has VI bindings(via a plugin) that’s actually pretty good(and can use neovim under the hood!). I still don’t understand Microsoft’s motivation for writing this thing, but it’s nice that they dedicate a talented team to it.

                                                  It’s very much still a work in progress, but it’s definitely usable.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    Here’s the story of how it was created[1]. It’s a nice, technical interview. However, the most important thing about this editor is that it marked an interesting shift in Microsoft’s culture. It appears that is the single most widely used open source product originating by MS.

                                                    https://changelog.com/podcast/277

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Thanks for linking that show up.

                                                  2. 2

                                                    It’s worth a try. It’s pretty good. I went from vim to vscode mostly due to windows support issues. I often switch between operating systems, so having a portable editor matters.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      It’s pretty decent editor to try it out. I’ve personally given up because it’s just too slow :| The only scenario in which I tolerate slowness, is a heavy-weight IDE (e.g., IntelliJ family). For simple editing I’d rather check out sublime (it’s not gratis, but it’s pretty fast).

                                                      1. 1

                                                        It doesn’t have to be a hard switch, I for example switch between vim and vs-code depending on the language and task. And if there is some Java or Kotlin to code then I will use Intellij Idea, simply because it feels like the best tool for the job. See your text editors more like a tool in your toolbelt, you won’t drive in a screw with a hammer, won’t you? I see the text editors I use more like a tool in my toolbelt.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          I do a similar thing. I’ve found emacs unbearable for java (the best solution I’ve seen is eclim which literally runs eclipse in the background), so I use intellij for that.

                                                          For python, emacs isn’t quite as bad as it is with java, but I’ve found pycharm to be much better.

                                                          Emacs really wins out with pretty much anything else, especially C/++ and lisps.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            VS Code has a very nice python module (i.e. good autocomplete and debugger), the author of which has been hired by MS to work on it full time. Not quite PyCharm-level yet but worth checking out if you’re using Code for other stuff.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        A common problem I see in trainings or the Hack & Learn is that presented with a lifetime problem, people start messing around with lifetime syntax.

                                                        This could have been me, I often tried the exact same thing that you pointed out. Thank you for writing this article!

                                                        1. 2

                                                          couldn’t you just do social activities in real life instead of using social media?

                                                          1. 4

                                                            I have a lot of interaction via social media (broadly defined, includes real-time chat) with people in other parts of the globe. Meeting them “IRL” is prohibitive in time and cost, yet we all derive value from the interaction online.

                                                            The same goes for people who I have met IRL and who are still in close physical proximity. Time constraints (read: kids) often makes meeting in real life hard to schedule. When we do plan to meet, social media takes out of the friction of planning and execution.

                                                            In fact, the main value FB brings to me is as as meeting and event organizing tool.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              I think this does not answer @dmonay’s original question and sounds a bit accusatory in the sense assuming that the author lacks real life social activities. Nonetheless, I think that social media is a big waste of time and a quick chat from person to person is worth more than thousand text messages. I also don’t like the trend that more and more people—at least in my social circle—try to communicate solely through instant messengers instead of giving a quick call. (Better to stop here before it goes even more offtopic.)

                                                              1. 3

                                                                Privacy focused social media just seemed like a huge oxymoron to me.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Sort-of. If I share something privately at a small gathering and the details get out, I know it’s because somebody there talked. I can reason about that; I can ask my friends which of them did it. I can’t assume that about facebook etc.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Let me reframe this in a way that will seem more obvious to you.

                                                                    “Privacy focused communication just seemed like a huge oxymoron to me.”

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Never write a letter or destroy one if you care about secrets.

                                                                2. -1

                                                                  They said on social media, ignorant of the irony of the statement.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    If you want privacy and dislike social media you can stop using it. Lobste.rs included. There is no irony because I am not suggesting staying on lobste.rs either.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      The fact that you are here implies you like social media. Nobody in here is talking about not liking social media, so who is your audience here?

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        The whole original post is someone grappling with wanting social interaction but hating being a cog in the online advertising machine. I’m just saying it might well be possible to opt out without being a hermit by trying other things (religion, sport, social clubs). To be honest, I often wonder if i do like social media or not, it clearly is addictive, and by some metrics it does not pay for itself.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I use the same dotfiles for home and work where different configurations like the email address used in ~/.gitconfig are applied through a simple .patch file: https://github.com/klingtnet/dotfiles/blob/master/Makefile#L19

                                                                  1. 16

                                                                    Finally, yes, everyone knows LinkedIn is very frustrating in a lot of ways. Unfortunately, network effects have made them the de facto official professional networking tool of much of the world

                                                                    Actually, I’ve quit all other mainstream social media except LinkedIn, and find it a pleasure to use. It’s like the sugar coated optimistic version of the world. There are very very few flamewars or socio-political rants, and people are in general more civil, professional, and upbeat.

                                                                    Looking forward to meeting fellow crustaceans in this rose-colored virtual utopia.

                                                                    1. 7

                                                                      and find it a pleasure to use.

                                                                      Interesting, I’ve experienced quite the opposite. Their UI was horrible and they required you to login to view messages you got from other users. Maybe my memory is off but I think they also advertised their premium features wherever they could. I am unsure what makes LinkedIn a pleasure to use or better than staying in touch with other professionals by email or some other form of communication.

                                                                      UPDATE: I may confused them with Xing, which is the german LinkedIn equivalent. Nonetheless, I don’t like both services.

                                                                      1. 15

                                                                        LinkedIn is also relentless with email marketing: I had to add a rule to block their marketing emails after two attempts to remove myself from their lists (I shouldn’t have been on their list to begin with, as I didn’t sign up). They are one of the worst offenders in this domain, it has to be said.

                                                                        In my short experience in tech, I haven’t had to use LinkedIn and haven’t been pressured to use it. That may be specific to the tech industry, but I am thankful for it.

                                                                      2. 3

                                                                        There are very very few flamewars or socio-political rants, and people are in general more civil, professional, and upbeat.

                                                                        I find that barley surprising, considering what kind of a social network it is.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          It’s like the sugar coated optimistic version of the world.

                                                                          That’s what makes it a bit painful for me. Still, it’s good that there’s at least some corners in the world that are like that.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          I am also at the 34c3 if someone wants to say hello.

                                                                          1. -2

                                                                            Lesson #0: be dishonnest and steal a lot of money

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Can you clarify this statement, what are you referring to?

                                                                              1. 12

                                                                                I don’t know about blatantly stealing money, but Microsoft has a long history of doing sketchy things typical of big businesses in other industries, and fighting it out in court. Lots of anti-competitive stuff, especially taking advantage of their large Windows install base to fuck over other companies. Things like intentionally breaking compatibility with competing software.

                                                                                In his finding of facts for United States v. Microsoft, Judge Jackson determined that because of IBM’s marketing of Lotus SmartSuite, and other alternatives to Microsoft products (like World Book electronic encyclopedia instead of Microsoft’s Encarta[8]), Microsoft “punished the IBM PC Company with higher prices, a late license for Windows 95, and the withholding of technical and marketing support.”[9]

                                                                                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Lotus_SmartSuite#cite_ref-8

                                                                                I don’t know how old you are but you might remember similar stuff happening with Netscape Navigator / Mozilla Firefox vs Internet Explorer in the late 90s.

                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  I refer to between other things to the secret contract that microsoft has with OEM which makes you can’t basically buy a PC without paying windows.

                                                                                2. 1

                                                                                  I’ll add to your statement that the big firms with billions of dollars to change the world as they see fit got it through lots of dishonesty that wouldn’t fly in FOSS-driven organizations. So, the best way to get a lot done might be encouraging people to make piles of money by any means necessary to later make some improvements to the software or physical world. Even more true when one thinks about the effects of lobbying such as the recent purchase of the FCC by a handful of companies in private industry. ;)

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    Basically you are making the classical justification of the means by the ends. Nothing new under the sun.

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      Exactly. Best way to operate in capitalist systems if wanting to influence them heavily. Idealists mostly end up writing blog posts griping about what successful capitalists are doing. They might even get successful but not majorly influential. Any exceptions are extra rare.

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        Strongly disagree, the best way to operate in capitalist systems is to make their best sabotage it. Definetily it will work in the long run.

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                                                                                          This one in U.S. has had a long run. The capitalists have won most of the time. They also have people working nonstop in Congress and courts on their agenda with media distracting their opponents who act much less. The combo of legal activity plus media influence has given them more victories over time as their opponents argue among themselves over details of media’s viewpoints instead of fact it’s a plutocracy. The saboteurs’ small victories are often reversed later with ease like we saw with civil rights vs Patriot Act earlier with Wheeler and net neutrality recently.

                                                                                          Your recommendation has been failing. Whereas, new capitalists have shaken up older ones regularly. Older ones taking new directions after markets, individuals, and so on convince them to also did this. The best strategy in a system is the one that produces results. I don’t like the necessary evil approach but it’s what works. It’s not like they can’t otherwise do good as capitalists. They just need something generating massive flow of money to use to accomplish their goals.

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                                                                                    Gates turned out to be a real Robin Hood

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                                                                                      Robin Hood wouldn’t bring us a Windows Tax that robs the poor and rich alike. That includes many in desperate circumstances who might have escaped them if monopolies and oligopolies like Bill’s didn’t ensure they’d face higher-than-necessary cost of living plus barriers to escaping them. More like he robbed everyone from the poor to the rich to make a fortune he later started giving to poorer groups of people to solve some of their problems.

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                                                                                        a robin hood who stole to the poor, it’s a shiny new concept.

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                                                                                          What kind of poverty includes a windows licence? Pre mobile phone era when he made his money poor people didn’t have computers, and generally didn’t deal with anyone who did. I think you’re imagining something very different to me when you speak of poverty.

                                                                                          Bill has personally given away over 28 billion usd, largely to help the poor (and reasonably effectively, too).

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                                                                                            poverty as in the second half of the population in any western country. For sure, the windows licence is not a problem for multimillionnaire companies.

                                                                                            If he was able to give 28 billion usd, it is because it take them to someone first.

                                                                                            You probably have some of classical robin hood behavior which is take to the poor to give to the poorest.

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                                                                                      I love this quote:

                                                                                      A programmer does not primarily write code; rather, he primarily writes to another programmer about his problem solution.

                                                                                      Edit: highlight

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                                                                                        Whose comment is that at the top?

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                                                                                          The URL says /resources/text/Knuth_Don so I would assume that the comment is from Donald Knuth.

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                                                                                          If your score is above your post count you’re doing fantastic. I don’t think anyone in this community treats them as a popularity contest.

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                                                                                            I also don’t have the impression. There’s a couple of highly active users here, they have a lot of karma. I can also tell that by seeing their name all the time.

                                                                                            Personally, I rarely look up the total score of others and mostly look at mine as a generic “people took interest in my comments this week”. I don’t care that much about the long-term sum. But I do somewhat care about the uptake after investing much time in that platform.

                                                                                            I sometimes look up the average score of others, but only out of curiosity. That happens maybe once every three months.

                                                                                            It was a useful info for me though, when I was new to this community. Am I talking to a regular? A newbie? A lurker? This is all useful context.

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                                                                                              It was a useful info for me though, when I was new to this community. Am I talking to a regular? A newbie? A lurker? This is all useful context.

                                                                                              This is the important part for me. It would be fine to hide the specific score and only show a classification like “newbie”, “link poster”, “active commenter”, “senior” which might include more data like “age of account” and “rank”.

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                                                                                              This is actually a brilliant idea! I think showing the average would be way more helpful and would guide participants toward writing less, higher quality comments.

                                                                                              I think it’s way more useful:

                                                                                              If we consider that someone who has written 10 comments and has a score 100 adds much more to a debate than a user with 1000 comments and a score of 1000.

                                                                                              Currently the user with the better contributions looks worse than the person with the lower quality contributions.

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                                                                                                would guide participants toward writing less, higher quality comments.

                                                                                                That assumes the comment vote = quality. It really doesn’t. It means it’s what one or more people in that thread in that context wanted to see, what a pile didn’t, or something in between. The metrics are inconsistent. Many comments with info in them also get either no votes or just one. There’s also whether it’s a hot-button topic where taking a certain position always gets a vote boost.

                                                                                                There’s enough problems connecting comment votes to any objective metric of quality that I don’t use averages for it. I have a guess that it’s probably OK if over 2. People’s responses to individual comments or private messages have been more reliable indicator for me.

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                                                                                                  I think showing the average would be way more helpful and would guide participants toward writing less, higher quality comments.

                                                                                                  I don’t think so, a high average score often only shows who’s expressing popular opinions because they receive a lot of upvotes.

                                                                                                  edit: s/get/receive

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                                                                                                  Thanks for the reply. I will meditate on that.