1. 4

    I guess I’ll be migrating really crappy legacy app from rhel5 to something newer (7 or 8).

    It is a wonderful piece of software. Database (oracle) has weird schema with lots of unrelated tables (probably forgotten from different project), missing indexes and queried by crappy queries. The main app is some sort of perl framework that was bent from its original purpose to do something very different. While starting, this framework selects a lot of stuff from the database which contains more perl (!), dumps them to a file, loads and eval. I guess it’s for flexibility. It has soap API. Not as part of the app itself, but standalone java web app connecting to the same database. This java also server another purpose - integrating with external system. The perl just sends GET to java which posts POST to another system and returns. I guess XML is just hard with perl.

    Since this has basically no documentation, it’s gonna be a real adventure.

    1. 1

      File synchronization service with on-demand local file loading.

      I always wanted a network file synchronization mechanism where all files, directories, symbolic links etc. are locally visible but the data of the files is only loaded on demand. There would be a command (and context menu item for graphical desktops) to load and unload specific files or directory trees for the local system. Once loaded locally, it should transparently and continuously synchronize the files with the server.

      With traditional remote disk mounts there’s no local storage space wasted, but usage experience suffers from the network dependency. File synchronization services are more pleasant to use since all files are local, but waste locale storage space. This would combine the advantages of both.

      1. 2

        libprojfs might help you on Linux? (disclaimer: wrote a bunch of it) You can build it without the C# extension points and make a responsive, virtualised filesystem mount.

        1. 2

          That looks promising. After a quick look into the project description, the project seems to revolve around the crucial part providing the necessary generalized APIs/libs to build such a synchronization mechanism. I’m gonna need to find time to dive into this. Thx.

        2. 1

          Have you seen Seafile?

          1. 1

            I took it for a spin apporximately 3 years ago. I did not notice that since then it now has the exact feature that I described. Thx for your hint. Would be extra nice, if it also ran on OpenBSD.

        1. 1

          I was blown away by the mention that it only took 4 months, but I was thinking about the kind of product my company builds, enterprise web frontends. The Kasta website seems like the perfect use case for this.

          1. 3

            Please elaborate? :-)

            1. 3

              The frontend we’re porting to React is a 15 year old mess of jQuery and Prototype.js. It’s huge and has many recurring components. React’s composability is key for us. Some individual controls take us 4 man-months to port. We have planned to do the whole port in over 4 total years.

              So when I read that you could implement the framework and port your site in 4 months and thought that that was a lot I was a bit surprised. But then I checked out the Kasta site. I don’t think I had ever before realized that use case can make such a difference for which framework would be best suited.

              A choice between the big frameworks today (React, Vue, Ember…) would mainly depend on what the dev would prefer to work with. The use case doesn’t really matter for those. I only think of that with things like Elm, which open up very new possibilities.

              From the examples in your docs, I can easily imagine what the Kasta source would look like, and how it wouldn’t work for our frontend. It sounds like something I’d want to use for a small hobby project. React has become my default expectation of what webdev should be like, but it’s so much hassle to start something.

              1. 1

                Some individual controls take us 4 man-months to port.

                Wow, that’s huge. Can you share what component is that?

                1. 2

                  For example, a seemingly simple thing like a value selector dropdown. The old UI code is so tightly coupled that it takes weeks to analyze where to even start. It’s also overloaded a bunch for specific cases, but with low cohesion and stuff like “if type==bla” in the supertype. And we can’t do everything at once so we have to figure out how to make it work with other parts of the old UI. And then we notice that some client projects inject js in the dropdowns which depends on the HTML structure of it and we have to make decisions about what we want to break…

                  We’re never just porting a component. OP very likely never has to deal with this. No matter how nasty the original jQuery code, he can just port the functionality in one go without even looking at the old logic.

                  1. 3

                    No matter how nasty the original jQuery code, he can just port the functionality in one go without even looking at the old logic.

                    It’s not exactly this easy. :) First, original right now is React code (it was jQuery 5 years ago, but that was an old story). Second, we’re making same code work with both React and TwinSpark, so components are reused. Which sometimes is hard because this means you have to kill weird React idioms - and that’s not easy.

                2. 1

                  but it’s so much hassle to start something

                  oh yes, a “simple setup” is already so huge

            1. 25

              I’m glad I left the macOS-ecosystem in 2012 for good in favor of Gentoo. Apple as a company is just milking and babysitting their customers, even if they don’t want to.

              I know many professionals that are locked within macOS due to software/habit, and I pity them.

              I made the switch by replacing each program with an open source one, one after the other. The restrictions mentioned in the article will make this even harder to achieve unless open source developers shell out the 100$ per year, which is highly unlikely. It’s all about keeping up the walled garden.

              Apple can screw themselves.

              1. 14

                I would be significantly less productive and make a ton less money if I went /back/ to Linux/BSD on the desktop.

                1. 5

                  What is the productivity boost that macOS gives you compared to Linux/BSD?

                  1. 10

                    A quick list off the top of my head:

                    • The ability to use certain closed source software (Adobe, many electron apps built by startups).
                    • Alfred (rofi/dmenu/etc are not even close without significant effort to configure them)
                    • The “help” button at the top of the screen which allows you to search context menus. (This existed in an older version of Unity but now afaik no longer exists in any modern DE.)
                    • Separation of control/command (you can use command+C in terminal instead of control+shift+c or just copying everything that gets highlighted, no need to mentally context switch every time you go between the Terminal and other apps).
                    • nicer looking websites (look at how much better websites look in a default Ubuntu/Fedora/whatever install vs MacOS, I think it’s fonts but even after copying all my MacOS fonts to Fedora it’s still not the same).
                    • tight hardware integration (longer battery life, fingerprint reader to unlock)
                    • Integration with iOS (easily send files between my phone and laptop via AirDrop; start reading a lobste.rs article on my phone and finish on my laptop)
                    • Finder preview (press spacebar to preview a file quickly)

                    Many of the above can be done on Linux, but either require a bunch of manual configuration or are clunky to use even after configured.

                    1. 4

                      Except maybe that first point, I really wouldn’t call that “a significant productivity boost”. Especially considering I’d have to walk into a vendor lock-in and buy overpriced baubles with weird keyboards etc.

                      1. 6

                        You’re right; it’s not one big thing, it’s a bunch of little things that make it more productive for me.

                        1. 1

                          If I believed hard enough that taking some pill would make me more productive, it might very well do so even if it didn’t contain any active substance. I’ve heard this “productivity talk” from Apple users multiple times and never got any reason to believe it’s actually something more than just a placebo effect taking place.

                          It’d be very interesting to see a controlled study on this. We’d define productivity as solving programming tasks, replying to e-mails, writing articles etc and see what the differences really are.

                          Like… OK. Everyone needs a different environment and I can imagine some people actually being more productive within Apple’s ecosystem, but it’s more about personal preferences than anything else. I’d expect all groups (Mac-, Windows-, Linux-with-GNOME-, Linux-with-KDE-, … users) to have roughly the same productivity, with some people being slightly more productive in certain environments, but probably not dramatically (assuming they’re motivated to actually try hard enough – so the study would probably have to be organized as a challenge with some neat prizes).

                          Basically what I’m trying to say is that it comes to reaching some optimal setup and even though my setup isn’t optimal at all, by migrating to macOS I’d gain very little and lose a lot. That’s because I’ve spent quite some time reaching the setup that works at least this well for me. I suppose that might be the case with most power users and some productivity boost is most likely to be expected with people who tried using Windows or Ubuntu in default configuration, didn’t like it and then got a MacBook. But I’m still kind of skeptical about its magnitude.

                        2. 2

                          Maybe also integration with iOS, but the rest is just what one’s used to. OSX and Windows feel clunky and limiting to me because I’m used to Unix, especially wrt cross platform development.

                          It’s all anecdotal.

                        3. 3

                          The hardware/software cohesion is nigh impossible to beat.

                      2. 3

                        You would be less productive at the beginning of the transition, yes. But you would eventually develop new workflows and then regain productivity.

                        I used to be 100% on macOS until a few years ago. My last 2 jobs I’ve been 100% on Linux and haven’t had any problems. I can install all of the corporate software on my Linux machine. I also haven’t seen any cuts in my paycheck… still making a ton of money (I think). ^_^’

                        I work on web services and most of our software runs on Linux. I got tired of learning 2 OSes. I personally didn’t find any value in running macOS to run Linux (in containers or via SSH). So I cut out the middleman. I also hated that macOS is Linux-like, but not actually. For example, you might end up learning the wrong nc or sed on macOS. Super annoying when debugging.

                        I do get the appeal of macOS and still recommend it to my family, but as a developer, I value the simplicity of learning 1 set of tools over vanity features. Whenever I have to switch to macOS, my productivity takes a huge hit, but that’s because I’ve learned Linux workflows.

                        1. 2

                          Totally understandable, and I’m not arguing that. There are many people making a really good living working with Macs, and admittedly, Macs are probably the greatest machines for creative works and are superior in terms of color space handling and font rendering, to just name two things.

                          Nevertheless, the price you pay for this advantage will grow further and further. If you only do it for work, that’s fine of course, godspeed to you! But if you look at it long-term, it looks rather bleak.

                        2. 4

                          If the best thing to happen to my computing career was learning Unix and the second best thing was finding Cygwin for Windows (a lifesaver), the worst decision was getting a MacBook at the end of 2019. Most frustrating keyboard and mouse (Magic Mouse) I have ever used in almost 50 years of using keyboards and X years of using mice. Just awful keyboard design, layout, touch & feel, disaster of a touchbar, no universality or standardization with anything but Macs.
                          I use multiple machines at home/work and I want everything to be configured the same everywhere to ease transitions between machines. Linux and Windows, I can configure to be sufficiently similar, but it’s virtually impossible with a MacBook and MacOS.
                          I figured that with 37 years to figure it out and with so many Linux devs using a Mac, Apple would have had to get their act together. Boy, was I wrong. Can’t wait to be done with it and get back to sanity.

                          1. 5

                            Mac hardware 10 years ago was the best on the market, and I loved using it. I am still using an old Apple USB Keyboard because I haven’t found anything matching its quality and feel. Apple changed under Tim Cook, and it will change even further.

                            What they probably don’t realize is that developers might not make the biggest portion of their revenue, but they keep the ecosystem alive. I like to call this fallacy the “fallacy of the gaussian belly”, because they probably only aim their efforts on the consumers (iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, etc.) and neglect the professional segment because it doesn’t make them as much money.

                            I hope I’m not sounding like an armchair-CEO here, but in my opinion they shouldn’t even penny-squeeze the Mac customers that much. What the developers do in turn for the ecosystem is much more valuable than just mere stockholder-profits and market value.

                            In the end, I see the problem in public trading and having a bean-counter at the top. The goals shift and the company goes down in the long-term. And now you might say “Why can you say that when Apple has just passed 2 billion market value?”. Just look at the market data of Apple before 1997. Before its demise under Sculley, Apple was at its most profitable, and just like Cook Sculley is a bean-counter. This degradation-process won’t be sudden and there were more factors at play in 1997, but it will happen in the long-term (10 years).

                            1. 1

                              I joined the Apple ecosystem as the owner of a PowerMac G3 B&W that was given to my dad by a friend in 2007. I became a massive fanboy pretty quickly. 13 years later, and I’m embarrassed at how far my ‘sports team’ have fallen. The next 20 years are gonna be a rough ride and I don’t plan to stay for long.

                              1. 1

                                It’s a good call to leave the sinking ship. I’m sure the ARM-Macs will be successful, but they will just be more locked down and not suitable for anyone interested and invested in open source software.

                        1. 4

                          .d directories are great when one manages files with a configuration manager.

                          You just have to ensure that a file is present or absent to change the configuration. No need to “check if line is in file” and fight with regexes.

                          Also, you won’t stomp on the maintainer’s default configuration on the next apt/dnf upgrade. I wish more app supported.

                          The only drawback is complexity. For example, did you know that systemd supports foobar.service.d/... for “drop-in units”? This is great when you have a generic foobar@.service and you want to override some parts with foobar@baz.service.d/. But when trying to understand what’s happening that can be tricky if you don’t use systemctl cat foobar@baz.service.

                          1. 2

                            IMO, the best alternative is to make your stuff do the right thing without user-specific configuration. You don’t need a program-managed ‘.d’ directory if the only changes from defaults are user-defined.

                            1. 2

                              Well I did know about foo.service.d, but didn’t know about systemctl cat :)

                            1. 30

                              Not entirely on topic, but related: your website has a banner which says

                              By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to the use of cookies.

                              The EU data protection body recently stated that scrolling does not equal consent, see for instance https://techcrunch.com/2020/05/06/no-cookie-consent-walls-and-no-scrolling-isnt-consent-says-eu-data-protection-body/

                              1. 25

                                Then again, he is the type who “cares about SEO”.

                                1. 3

                                  Wait, what’s wrong with caring about SEO?

                                  1. 5

                                    There was a time were SEO was synonymous with tricking the search engines into featuring your site. The running theme was SEO was a set of dark patterns and practices to boost your ranking without investing in better content.

                                    For many people SEO still has similar connotations.

                                    1. 16

                                      There was a time …

                                      Did that change?

                                      1. 0

                                        Did that change?

                                        Based on my recent efforts at looking into these things from a developer point of view, I would say yes it’s changing.

                                      2. 6

                                        AFAIK, there’s still considered to be “White hat” and “Black hat” SEO. White hat SEO involves stuff like organizing links and URLs well, including keywords appropriate to what you actually do, writing quality content, and per this article, encouraging links to your domain and paying attention to whether they use nofollow. Generally, stuff that doesn’t go against the spirit of what the search engine is trying to do, tries to get more legitimate users who genuinely want your product to find it and learn about it more easily etc.

                                        Black hat SEO involves stuff like spinning up link farms, spamming links across social media and paying for upvotes, adding a bazillion keywords for everything under the sun unrelated to what you’re doing, etc. Generally trying to trick search engines and visitors into doing things against their purposes.

                                        It may feel a little dirty at times, but it’s probably tough to get a business going in a crowded market without paying attention to white hat SEO.

                                        1. 2

                                          It may feel a little dirty at times, but it’s probably tough to get a business going in a crowded market without paying attention to white hat SEO.

                                          This is common issue for healthcare sites. If you have bona fide information that’s reviewed and maintained by experts it competes with sites selling counterfeits, outdated information, conspiracy theories, etc. These sites try every trick they can to scam people. If you don’t invest in SEO you are wasting people’s time with bad information in most cases, but some people can be harmed. In the US this can boil down to a freedom of speech discussion, but if you work internationally you have clearer legal obligations to act.

                                          Search engines do want to help directly in some cases, but there is still an expectation that the good guys are following what would be considered white hat SEO practices. White hat SEO often has other benefits with accessibility, so I think it’s worth listening.

                                          1. 3

                                            Yep, this is a bit unfortunately true. IIRC, StackOverflow had to implement SEO practices as, without it, other sites that scraped their content and rehosted it were actually getting higher rankings in Google than SO themselves.

                                        2. 3

                                          Makes sense. I wish more people (developers in particular) would start questioning these connotations. The present-day advice on how to do SEO right is a lot different from what it used to be.

                                          1. 8

                                            As the parent said, SEO originally meant “hacking” google search rankings but over time, Google eliminated these hacks one by one, saying the whole time that their goal was to deliver search results that were relevant and useful. However, the way they define “relevant and useful” is primarily:

                                            1. How closely the page content matches the serarch query
                                            2. How many “reputable sources” link to the page
                                            3. How long visitors stay on the page (usually directly related to length)
                                            4. How many people click on the link

                                            So SEO became less about technical trickery and is now more about human trickery. This resulted in the rise of what I call “blogspam”, i.e. blogs that crank out content with affiliate links and ads peppered throughout. This might not be a bad thing per se, except that most of the time I land on blogspam, I am inundated by pop-up dialogs, cookie warnings, ads and miles of empty content designed to make you Just Keep Scrolling or hook you with an auto-play video. Because both of these things keep you on the page longer, which increases their search rankings.

                                            This isn’t always quite so bad for tech-related queries, where StackOverflow and its ilk have cornered nearly every result, but try searching for something generic like “hollandaise sauce recipe” or “how to get rid of aphids” or “brakes on a Prius” and you will drown in an unending sea of blogspam.

                                            This has been another episode of “What Grinds bityard’s Gears”

                                            1. 1
                                              1. How closely the page content matches the serarch query

                                              Since you put “relevant and useful” in quotes, I’m assuming you feel that a search query matching the page content is not a good signal of whether a search result is good. I’m curious why you think that?

                                              Just Keep Scrolling or hook you with an auto-play video. Because both of these things keep you on the page longer, which increases their search rankings.

                                              That’s actually not true. Google made a blog post a while ago mentioning that pop-up dialogs (or anything that reduces content accessibility) reduces search rankings.

                                              In any case, while I do agree that not all SEO advice is (or has historically been) good, the blanket statement that all SEO advice is bad is also not correct (or fair). Besides, the black-hat SEO advice is slowly becoming more and more pointless as Google gets smarter at figuring things out.

                                              1. 1

                                                This isn’t always quite so bad for tech-related queries, where StackOverflow and its ilk have cornered nearly every result, but try searching for something generic like “hollandaise sauce recipe” or “how to get rid of aphids” or “brakes on a Prius” and you will drown in an unending sea of blogspam.

                                                I feel the pain, but is this less about SEO and more about how certain people have developed business opportunities? SO has largely replaced expertsexchange in search results, but in a way this was one of the founder’s aims that has been mentioned in various places.

                                                The StackExchange network of sites has been trying to expand to cover, your example of “how to get rid of aphids”, but it hasn’t yet been successful. There is inertia with getting these sites off the ground and employing people to write quality questions and answers, but this doesn’t align with the community ethos. Arguably, it would be better for the web since you’d get a better experience when you click through search results. I wish there was an easier answer.

                                                I don’t see why there couldn’t be a recipe site with the quality user experience you associate with SO. There are however a lot of entrenched interests and competition. People also have a tendency of sharing copyrighted recipes they’ve copied down from friends or family. Incumbents won’t react like expertsexchange to SO.

                                          2. 3

                                            SEO is like ads on the internet; in theory it’s a good thing, helps people to find relevant content, helps companies to make more profits. But in reality, it’s just a pissing contest who exploits the user most. If a company made some money by using some shady SEO tricks, then we’ll do it 2x more intensively, so we’ll earn some money too. Who cares that the search engine results will be less accurate?

                                            1. 1

                                              To be honest, try looking up the modern SEO recommendations (black hat SEO is becoming more and more pointless as Google gets smarter at figuring things out). You’ll be pleasantly surprised.

                                        3. 6

                                          The funny part is that the only cookie used on this site (that I can see) is the cookie that stores the fact that the user accepted the use of cookies :D

                                          Also, the law never forced the display of the “cookie wall” for purely-technical cookies (eg: login and such), but only those aimed at tracking.

                                        1. 5

                                          For those that want to check their own cert quickly: Check whether a host’s certificate needs replacement

                                          1. 6

                                            They actually sent me an email this (US) morning notifying me that one of my certs was affected. It was great. Would have been even better if they said which cert it was, so I didn’t have to go renew all certs on all of my systems. Oh well.

                                            1. 8

                                              Email I got did include list of certificates with their serial numbers.

                                          1. 6

                                            I have 2 set up so far, but I have 2 more I’m considering.

                                            For the two I have, one is a Pi 4 4GB running Kodi (by way of LibreELEC), connected to my TV. The other one is a Pi 3 running Home Assistant. Both run cool/fine, and are single purpose for each.

                                            I’m also considering running a music server (some combination of MPD and snapcast) for one of the remaining pi’s. I had purchased a 314GB HDD from WD when they sold them stupid cheap, and it’s been sitting idle since then. That’s plenty of storage for a music collection.

                                            1. 2

                                              I really like this. I have been thinking about replacing my Apple TV for some time. How do you control your Kodi install? Keyboard? Or does it work with some remote controller?

                                              1. 3

                                                You can use your TV remote. (If it’s connected with hdmi and supports CEC protocol)

                                                1. 2

                                                  Oh I see, I have to check that out. Thanks!

                                                2. 1

                                                  You can also use a mobile app (Kore) to control Kodi on your local network.

                                              1. 3

                                                I used to have small VPS for this, but now I just use Google DNS.

                                                1. 2

                                                  I might have solved a level with JavaScript before I realized this is PHP… 🤦‍

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I got to level 4 and then headed back here to read comments. Only after yours I realized it wasn’t JavaScript.

                                                  1. 12

                                                    It seems like I’m the only here whose $HOME looks like a junkyard.

                                                    1. 5

                                                      Mine is a junkyard too. It (the /home partition) is also (relatively) small at 15gigs.

                                                      Instead I keep a separate partition (/mnt/awal/) all clean and organized, and then symlink/source a few files and directories back into home. I find that this conveniently allows me to separate machine-agnostic things from machine-specific.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        No, you’re not alone. The only folder I create besides the usual XDG user directories is ~/code, for /bin there is already ~/.local/bin. In my humble opinion, micro managing dotfiles and $HOME subdirectories is plain procrastination (which is not a bad thing per se).

                                                        Edit: typo.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        Can anybody tell me how to disable the “preview tab” state, where you click on something once in the explorer (or more importantly open it with cmd-p), and it opens but in a “preview” tab that will be replaced? Or better yet, I’d like to promote “preview” tabs (I’m probably using the wrong term here) into real tabs once you’ve had it open and/or focused for a few minutes?

                                                        1. 3

                                                          I haven’t figured out how to disable, but I did learn double click opens for real. Now I use lame open on purpose for files I just want to preview.

                                                          I wish the function was reversed.

                                                          1. 8

                                                            You can disable “preview” mode entirely with this setting:

                                                            "workbench.editor.enablePreview": false
                                                            

                                                            …or just from Quick Open with this one:

                                                            "workbench.editor.enablePreviewFromQuickOpen": false
                                                            
                                                          2. 2

                                                            If you save the file (cmd+s) it will make the tab permanent. If I understand what you meant.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              That’s a useful trick I need to keep in mind, chur.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                Saving works—there’s also a command to just keep the file open named “View: Keep Editor” (workbench.action.keepEditor). The default keyboard shortcut is ⌘K Enter.

                                                            2. 1

                                                              I’ve disables preview, it’s annoying (see other comments for details). As for “promoting” you can double click on the tab to do that.

                                                            1. 6

                                                              I just use Things. I have no plan to move away from Apple jail ecosystem in the foreseeable future so…

                                                              1. 3

                                                                I also use Things, just on my laptop though (I keep my phone off of email, calendar, etc.).

                                                                Past monday the macOS Catalina update rendered my Macbook unbootable (sent to apple repair yesterday). In the meantime I’m running a live Ubuntu bootable thumb drive.

                                                                While Things is not available off-Apple, it’s nice they store everything you do in a single SQLite database file. Until I have my Macbook back I’ll be running Things with a SQL editor.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Past monday the macOS Catalina update rendered my Macbook unbootable (sent to apple repair yesterday).

                                                                  Same. Booted in safe mode, turned out it was a bad kext. Updated it and chugging along happily-er now.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Mine doesn’t even respond to the boot time keystrokes in order to boot in safe mode, or verbose, or boot from a thumb drive…

                                                                    I tried everything, but there’s nothing I could do without tearing it down.

                                                                    May I know your model? Because a friend of mine also had his install broken. Also, is the bad kext related to Little Snitch? Thx.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017) – the bad kext was a corporate MDM thing (“Carbon Black”). But yikes, yours sounds muuuuch worse. I could access safe mode. Recovery was working but even once booted into recovery the dialogs were lagging for 5+ minutes.

                                                                2. 2

                                                                  Things

                                                                  This comment made me check it out, and damn. I’ve been using Todoist for a couple years and this blows it out of the water. Thanks!

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    +1 for Things. I have a soft spot for the idea of a bullet journal but Things is just so good.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Things is the only software I’ve ever missed after leaving apple.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        I have a mac laptop, but an android phone, so I would be hesitant to use Things.

                                                                  1. 13

                                                                    I was really confused about what was supposed to complete that sentence. After trying “John Carmack” and “admin@gmail.com” I finally figured it out by putting in “google” and getting an unrelated result:

                                                                    @font-face in CSS allows to include your own fonts inside an email.

                                                                    Of course, the really obvious guesses in this category of “bold”, “italics”, and “colors” don’t give any results either. I’m really questioning the primary presentation of this information. It seems to be much more suited to list format like on the features page.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      I still have no idea what this site is all about.

                                                                      1. 6

                                                                        It’s pretty much the same as [caniuse.com] (https://caniuse.com/) - website for frontend developers which lists browser compatibility for various CSS/Js features. Except this is not compatibility with browsers but email clients.

                                                                      2. 1

                                                                        I spent like 2-3 minutes on there before giving up… Still lost.

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          I spent like 2 minutes thinking about it and then finally guessing it might be about which HTML/CSS features are understood by email clients.

                                                                          But only because I had to spend hours to do this, years ago.

                                                                          It’s really, really badly communicated

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Why are the speed comparisons against different product every time? Why not against just one (or all of them)?

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          For summarization, but have a reference to all. Tried to have the best of all in every category.

                                                                          • VSCode was the fastest in load (if you set all the limit values to high numbers).
                                                                          • Sublime was the best in memory usage.
                                                                          • NPP was the fastest between all for finding strings.
                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            Ok, thank. This way it looks like you’re cherry-picking only measurement in your favor :)

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Nah, just opposite of it to prevent the “This is too good” signal.

                                                                        1. 5

                                                                          CAPTCHA is instant turn down for me. I basically do not use services having one. Not sure how world turned into that given there are bunch of better solutions that are not converting you to human MI trainers.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            I basically do not use services having one.

                                                                            You don’t always have a choice. For example to get the deposit on my rental apartment back I had to fill in three (yes, three) of them. I wasn’t happy, but it’s better than losing £1 400.

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                                                                              Obviously, when I have a choice.

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                                                                              Which solutions would you recommend?

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                                                                                • Rate limiter with good settings is certainly better since you get blockage only after the fact, not before.
                                                                                • Scripts that recognize human behavior (i.e. keypress habits are pretty much unique, mouse movements etc.).
                                                                                • There are way better capcha’s also, less intrusive, time taking, error prone etc. The main problem with Google captchas is that you, as a human, fail frequently. Any serious captcha would make this very hard or impossible.

                                                                                Seriously, punish those that use captcha. I never understood concept where companies punish normal users in order to prevent unwanted behavior of marginal group of users and all because their own technical shortcomings or issues (typical in banking and gov and many software domains - look into what Steinberig did to Cubase as a greatest exmaple ).

                                                                                I think people should punish such coorp behavior by not using the services and spreading the word of treating you like a dumb feathery animal…

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                                                                              One of the biggest retailers in Czech Republic also uses social proof on their website. It got really funny when they started offering Teslas.

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                                                                                I don’t know that much about docker, but do you even need full OS image? Recently there was a thread here about minimal nginx image without all this stuff. Can this be done with python?

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                                                                                  All you need is whatever your application depends on, so any shared libraries etc.

                                                                                  I regularly create Docker images for Go programs using Docker’s “scratch” image, i.e. the image only has my Go binary because it’s statically linked.

                                                                                  Sometimes people like to have more in the image, such as a shell and a file viewer so they can exec into the container to debug things.

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                                                                                  Redmine wiki.

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                                                                                    I like articles like this. They make me happy. Then I check can I use and get sad again. Usually it’s IE/Edge, which may be dead, but we can’t completely ignore it yet.