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    Paul Graham knows he’s smarter than most people (that’s not hard, most of us in here are, statistically), and he still thinks this fact makes him right all the time. He’s rich and has a big audience, so this is unlikely to change.

    Not sure why this post needs to exist, but definitely can’t see why it needs to be here.

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      PG reminds me of a pattern I’ve seen in other people. That is, a person experienced in one particular area develops the idea they are experienced in many other areas. They then proceed to share their wisdom of these areas, when in reality they know jack shit. The way these people write or speak can make it difficult to distil bullshit from facts.

      When encountering such people, especially if they develop a cult following like PG, I think it’s entirely reasonable to call such people out. The article posted may beat around the bush a bit too much, but it provides many good examples. As such, I think it’s existence is entirely valid.

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        Engineer’s disease? The amusing part to me, is that it reminds me of that trope in movies “oh, you’re a scientist? clearly you’re a polymath” - except it’s real.

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          Yeah, I agree - when i was younger and finding my footing in tech i was quite taken with PG (and i certainly do feel like spending some time learning lisp has made the functional programming paradigm more intuitive to me) but it has been valuable to me to see critiques of his work as well, especially in trying to apply the things he actually was expert at to unrelated fields. He certainly was personally successful - more so than most people criticizing him, I’m sure (but things aren’t necessarily fair), but it can be helpful to point out that at some point he just stopped being very relevant.

          …but I personallly still don’t like java, and prefer lispy FP to heavy handed OOP.

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          because for sure in this audience there are people that would take his expertise in programming as a source of authority on other topics (pretty much like most people do with celebrities advocating for a cause) and maybe it’s useful to remind them, with terms they can understand, that this is magical thinking a few rich people use to steer the whole sector.

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            They will not rest until they cancel https://timecube.2enp.com/

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            Can m$ sue amazon, similarly how oracle sued google?

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              M$ has much better reputation than Oracle.

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                would be kind of ironic given that ms filed a brief in favor of google in that case

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                Mathematics is vital and fundamental to programming. The problem is, “mathematics” is a vast field that isn’t just arithmetic and calculus.

                When I write code, I have to know some:

                • arithmetic (obviously)
                • algebra (the concept of factoring, variables, etc)
                • predicate logic (conditionals, branches, filters, existence predicates, etc)
                • set theory (collections, intersections, unions, and definitely anything dealing with databases)
                • relational algebra (if dealing with relational databases)
                • lattices (class hierarchies)
                • ordering (total orders, partial orders, sorting, stable versus unstable sort)
                • automata (regular expressions, parsers)
                • combinatorics (count numbers of possible states, etc)
                • algorithms (everything, plus Big-O)

                All of these things are going to be known to a greater or lesser extent by even moderately-skilled hackers, even if the hacker doesn’t know that they know it. I understood predicate logic as a programmer long before I ever understood it as a pure mathematical discipline. I knew regular expressions long before I knew about automata theory. Total-versus-partial ordering comes up the first time you sort different datatypes.

                The problem is that these things aren’t presented to “hackers” as “math”…they’re just “hacking”. I learned all the things in the above list long before I ever attended a formal computer science class (though obviously, I know them better now and know, especially, how much I didn’t know then and don’t know now).

                The problem, in my opinion, with “pure” or “formal” mathematics is that I have no entry point. I learned about all those things because I had to to write software…and before I wrote software, I could use software. I could sit down and use an operating system and get an intuitive idea of “process” and “file” and all that, even if I didn’t actually know how they worked under the hood.

                More “formal” mathematics is not something that you can do that with, though. I can’t sit down and “use” topology theory or number theory or whatever the way I can use a text editor. The difference between “hacker math” and “math” is that you can get to one by hacking and you get to the other by…I mean, I realize there’s experimenting with math and stuff but it’s not (at least not to me) like sitting down at a computer and playing around.

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                  I think this is a good observation. I’ve found that it’s easier to learn stuff when I’m curious about the result because it would help me solve a problem. I think a curriculum that used programming problems to motivate diving into the underlying math would be great for CS people, teach the process of going from a problem to calculating the more formal math, and then applying that.

                  At least, that sounds better than my CS degree, which had plenty of math and programming but rarely at the same time.

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                    Formal math isn’t about how to get “practical” or “useful” results from a technique, it’s about how and why the technique works at all. It’s all about proof. And you’re right, it’s difficult to learn because it’s so self-contained. Usually the entry points come from needing to go deeper into some particular application. Like, if you do 3D graphics you might eventually need to understand why quaternions don’t commute.

                    If you want to play with math like you’d play with an OS or a programming language, install SageMath or something similar, and just start working through some tutorials and textbooks. It’s not really all that different. You might just need to re-calibrate your expectations about what “use” means.

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                    This looks like exactly what I need for homelab sautomation.

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                        Thanks for the writeup! I’m still waiting on mine to ship so at least reading other people’s experience gives me something to do.

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                          Packing and moving tomorrow. Hopefully the new place and taking the whole week off will do some good for my mentality.

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                            Moving is a pain. I just finished a move recently. Are you doing everything yourself or using movers?

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                              Everything myself. I don’t get to take much so I’m basically starting from scratch save for smaller things. Moving out from home for the first time drains one’s wallet real fast.

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                                Agree… but later when you have a bunch of stuff, it still drains your wallet, just, differently. (Paying to move all the stuff rather than get it the first time,)

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                            Does anyone know the timeframe for delivery? I purchased one a few days ago, got a receipt, but haven’t heard much else. Just curious what I should expect.

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                              it takes a little while as they build and ship from China but I’m unaware of the exact length.

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                                They don’t ship constantly, but they are currently shipping, so hopefully you (and I) get shipping notifications this next week. Lookup Pine64 on Twitter for more updates.

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                                  Don’t know specifically about the PineBook, but my PinePhone took a while - a couple of months from pre-order through manufacturing and shipping. Worth the wait though :)

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                                  Wow, I’m reading a lot of mac equivalents for the features afforded by AutoHotKey but I’m surprised no one has mentioned Alfred (£25).

                                  The downside of Alfred is that its drag-and-drop-blocks automation feature, Alfred Workflows, relies on integration with other apps. This means you need BetterTouchTool to bind your mouse/trackpad/remote, and you need to know bash/zsh/ruby/python/anything to actually get things done.

                                  The upside of Alfred is that it’s really easy to pick up. In short, you write scripts that take in argv and spit out stdout. Then you have Alfred handle the rest, i.e. passing outputs to inputs and binding hotkeys.

                                  Yea there’s a whole library of cool blocks, but (since I prefer bash) pretty much all of my workflows look like

                                  [hotkey block] --> [bash script block]
                                  

                                  You don’t need to learn another language for automation. I’m only drawing from bash knowledge, but that’s enough to bind these bash one-liners with minimal learning and effort:

                                  • a hotkey to draw a Graphviz or mermaid.js graph from highlighted code. [Hotkey block] sends currently highlighted text to [bash block], which saves it to /tmp, pipes through dot or mermaid.js, and opens the results in your favorite image viewer
                                  • a hotkey to compile and run code you’ve highlighted. [Hotkey block] sends currently highlighted text to [bash block], which saves it to /tmp, pipes through gcc, runs, and opens the results in your favorite text editor.
                                  • a hotkey to run OCR on the clipboard and paste the result. [Hotkey block] sends current clipboard contents to [bash block], which pipes the clipboard image through your favorite OCR command to stdout, and sends that to a [clipboard paste block].

                                  The key in “handling the rest” that I couldn’t find in any other automation software, is offering lots of control over inputs and outputs between blocks. Instead of argv, you can pass data into a block via straight up text replacement into the bash script block, controlling what characters get escaped. Or store it in a variable, or log it to a nice debug console, or pass it to another workflow… I find this level of control in “handling the rest” to be incredibly important, since the last thing I want to learn is how to stop my automator from escaping backslashes or utf-8-garbaging my outputs.

                                  tl;dr as far as automation software goes, I’ve found Alfred Workflows to be dead easy to pick up since it leverages your existing knowledge and offers the least surprise

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                                    I use alfred… although, i must with some embarrassment admit that I mostly use it just so I can type this: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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                                    Happy to see that macos support is in a much better state now :)

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                                      Hope they keep up the good work! I’m waiting for this: https://gitlab.com/inkscape/inbox/-/issues/1577

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                                        https://gitlab.com/inkscape/inbox/-/issues/1577 Interesting - it seemed to be working fine for me (i didn’t open a huge/ super complicated image). I’m on mojave.

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                                      Company: AWS

                                      Company site: https://www.amazon.jobs

                                      Position(s): [Systems|Software] Engineers

                                      Location: Onsite, Washington DC area or Seattle

                                      Description: Work with me and my teammates to deploy AWS IoT services to air-gapped regions and support government customers operating in those regions. This is a US citizen/security clearance role (but of course AWS has a lot of other opportunities of all kinds.) Full description: https://www.amazon.jobs/en/jobs/984834/system-engineer or

                                      Tech stack: Ruby/Java/Python, Linux, AWS Services

                                      Contact: Apply through amazon.jobs link above but message me (kennebru@amazon.com) if you’re interested/have questions, I can make sure you don’t get lost in the void. (I’m not a recruiter or official spokesperson, just a SysEng who would be glad for a few more good teammates!)

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                                        i like this idea a lot!

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                                          I was bored today and wanted to learn more about RPN calculators. Some searching brought me to this video, that’s not only funny in it’s nearly monty python-esque presentation, and the sudden costumes, but also interesting since first of all I was quite surprised to see this sophisticated calculators (supporting stuff like symbolic algebra, string concatenation, and on-device user programming) existing in the early 90’s –albeit for a high price, and secondly it’s a quite nice introduction to stack programming, just with HP’s language.

                                          I guess I should add the disclaimer that this is actually a kind of infomercial/manual, but I guess since it’s for an discontinued product, I hope nobody has too much of an issue with this.

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                                            Its hilarious to me that you posted this since i was just watching this video earlier, having bought myself an hp48sx via Craigslist earlier this week. I really like RPN (although mostly i use it via a phone app), i don’t really get why it’s seen as unintuitive (but i mean, people are different and that’s ok.)

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                                            This is interesting - I’m in the camp of people who have more or less bounced off of KiCad, is this more intuitive?

                                            Edit: Subjective question I know, but I’m interested in any anecdotes one way or the other.

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                                              Brings back memories of playing noctis iv back in the day (when there was still hope of a noctis v). Arguably that game had most of the good parts of no mans sky (given the limitations of the time).

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                                                I’d like to call out Amazon in my personal experience (i know this can vary) as a good example - I reached out to one of their recruiters and was asked for my resume, and from then on was walked competently through the process - I started a position with them not long ago. I know it helps for them that they operate at a scale which lets them have recruiters in house.

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                                                  It doesn’t take a large one to do it better. The smaller firms down here just have the managers do it. The best ones have managers and engineers in the interview. I keep wonderimg why these other companies don’t do that.

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                                                    We never conduct any interviews without engineers (even for non-engineering positions). Pretty easy to do (unavoidable in fact) if all managers are also engineers. ;)

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                                                    From what I know, Amazon managers do their own recruiting so you’ll often get emails from many departments at once. I always found that strange.

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                                                      My experience with Amazon recruiting has been different. I’m regularly contacted by different recruiters from Amazon about roles in places I have no inclination to move to & I cannot get them to stop.

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                                                        Yeah I’ve heard of this happening

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                                                      I’m going to have to start using this

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                                                        I frequently buy paper copies of books from No Starch Press, even though through humble bundle I often have very cheap access to the pdfs. I don’t even mind reading PDFs on my ipad, but I’ll gladly buy a physical copy of anything well written that I will actually read, to me that’s never wasted money.

                                                        1. 5

                                                          I definitely enjoyed reading this! I would like to point out though (and i may butcher the explanation) that there is a position which supports property rights in general but strongly opposes copyright/the idea of “intellectual property”, on the basis that property rights are a necessary result of scarcity, so it does make sense to have scarce things have an owner and it doesn’t make sense for not-scarce things to have an owner - under this view i have no objection to Disney retaining full ownership of Disneyland and using it for their corporate profit, but I do have an objection to them maintaining full ownership of every idea they have ever imagined, because that kind of “ownership” does actually take freedoms away from me (I can not, for example, create a mod for a video-game that adds characters which Disney claims to own without expecting them to eventually come make me stop.)

                                                          I feel like that’s a long winded way of saying that precisely because I do agree with the author that this new world of postscarcity (at least as regards the world of software) we live in allows for an unrestrained/nontransactional giving that was totally impossible in the past, I can’t agree that we should look at Stallman/Linus/etc as misguided because they are more quarrelsome, because there are real ways that these freedoms CAN be taken away from us. There’s a reason the MIT license still has to be a license and not just “do whatever you want” because there are people who are not “mere” freeloaders but who would happily, if allowed, take what was given freely, claim ownership themselves, and then use litigation to prevent other people from also receiving the gift (and there are a lot of subtle ways to effectively do the same thing.)

                                                          But really I enjoyed the post, I don’t mean to be contentious/split hairs. :P

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                                                            Thanks so much for putting this - I had read it before years ago, but totally failed to find a link to it when I wanted to reference it.

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                                                              Tim Rogers used to have some of the most beautiful internet writing back then. I always remember this one too:

                                                              http://archives.insertcredit.com/features/dreaming2/