Threads for kvz

  1. 16

    Sorry to be grouchy, but these articles are always the same: an OSX user griping that Ubuntu isn’t exactly the same as OSX. Always the same nitpicks, too: “I don’t understand X11 copy/paste!”; “My proprietary Apple hardware works best with the proprietary Apple OS!”; “The default, generic Ubuntu configuration doesn’t fully utilize my hardware out of the box!”, etc.

    I’d love to see one of these where the author chooses an out of the ordinary system config (anything but Ubuntu, anything but Gnome and KDE) or where they actually try to understand and explain why things are different.

    1. 12

      I think this is a good article, actually – the author does offer concrete examples of how they’ve made life easier on Ubuntu.

      1. 14

        The author writes a detailed post making it easier for people to consider switching to free software, and you can only find faults with it? That’s not very constructive.

        1. 7

          I don’t think it’s unfair or unconstructive to point out that this article is rehashing a bunch of old talking points.

          It’s great that people are switching to free software, but there’s little value in each person writing an article about their particular case. IMO, of course.

          1. 5

            About half of the post is something I’d write myself after a project like this - a bunch of commands used to install software. It’s nice it has value for others.

            It’s a bit unfair to complain about the post author, they didn’t submit this post here…

            1. 4

              Here now so fire at will! Someone pointed me here and sent me an invite :)

              1. 2

                Nah, I’m good with the post :D

        2. 2

          For what it’s worth I did link to two articles that explain about the copy/paste issue. As for the other points of critique.. I don’t think I’m guilty of those, except for writing yet another post about switching to ubuntu article. This one was a long time coming though. Started on it many months ago :o

        1. 1

          I understand about the keyboard, but there is a workaround until Apple puts out models with solid keyboards again. I bought a perfect-condition used 15” 2015 model for €800 a couple of months back. I don’t understand sinking that much time into getting something kinda-working when you’re running a business.

          1. 4

            Or, and stay with me here, Windows?

            1. 3

              If I was a rational being, yes : ) MS worked hard to alienate me in the Ballmer days tho. One day i’ll get over it. Hopefully by the time BashOnWindows (or however it is branded these days) supports GPU/Cuda, and similar not-quite-linux issues have been solved.

              BUT then there’s ads and surveillance? How are people okay paying for an OS but then later the company also squeezing even more money out of you after the transaction by selling your attention/screenestate/privacy?

              1. 1

                | How are people okay

                They don’t.. Or at least I’m not. I’ll have to see what my w7 desktop will become in the future. As of now I’ve moved myself and my family including grandparents completely to KUbuntu. This started when microsoft gave you the fear of upgrading to windows 10 over night. (So there was the possibility of getting calls from your parents that everything’s changed or worse broken..)

                They were used to firefox + thunderbird + libreoffice before, so it wasn’t that of a big jump, in terms of daily software.

                And I got away from any modern days scam mail software, as they tend to only work on windows. (and require things like hidden file extensions and auto-executing JS files on click..)

              2. 1

                Absolutely. Or Linux, but where there is less work required to get it running smoothly.

                I’ve been perfectly productive on Linux on a Thinkpad many times, with the tweaks required to get them running smoothly being fewer and easier over the years. My last one was a t450s with KDE Neon and the only tweak I needed was to make the fingerprint scanner work. I would have lived without it.

                Windows is fine if you don’t mind the amount of UI churn, the flow-breaking updates, the adverts(!) and the malware threat. I don’t mean this snidely - it really is fine.

              3. 2

                For my work I kinda need as much speed as I can get as it increases my productivity near-linearly for many jobs (like video encoding tests). So I’m kinda stuck on the (Apple) high end and who knows what Apple ships next and for how much. It felt like a liability. I feel I’m ensured of a fast machine forever now.

                1. 1

                  I’m curious about the world of external GPUs. I don’t have a use for them myself, but they seem to be a thing now. Does your video encoding get a lot faster with a ‘proper’ desktop GPU with big fans?

                2. 1

                  You may very well be buying a ultrabook if you’re already going for a specific vendor and a stable OS.

                1. 1

                  Another day, another “Mac to Ubuntu” post.

                  Also, regarding:

                  There are other ways but if I want to type an é, out of the box, I have to type: U 00e9, and then, that doesn’t not work in my code editor. […]

                  The author can try using the Compose key.

                  Edit: My bad, that’s already been linked to in the paragraph. In any case, for those who aren’t aware…

                  1. 1

                    Yeah sorry, seen a few more. This one was a long time coming though. Started on it many months ago :o And thank you for sharing about Compose! I will look into that more.

                    1. 2

                      The compose key is really neat - you can even make a ~/.XCompose file and add your own shortcuts.

                      I’ve got one for 👍 (because I can’t be bothered to choose emoji with the mouse or from a list) and ✓, ☐, ☑, and for fun 🤸.

                      Info on how in https://askubuntu.com/questions/47496/how-can-i-add-a-custom-compose-key-sequence

                      1. 1

                        No worries! I hope I didn’t come off as rude – your article was well laid out, I must say.

                    1. 5

                      I invested in a screen with high DPI, but it’s not ‘Retina’, and the fonts don’t render like they do on macOS. It seems like a small thing, but 4 weeks in, I never would have thought I still sometimes feel as though my eyes are dry and almost literally hurting :thinking: Did Steve Jobs spoil/ruin me for life?

                      It seems like a small thing, but on Linux (and heck, even Windows) non-latin character sets are pixelated and hard to read. Even for latin character sets, Linux looks significantly worse. :/

                      1. 0

                        Nah, kerning and font display on Windows are pretty darn nice, and I have to wonder if some of the author’s complaints don’t originate with the Dell XPS13 specifically.

                        I bought a high end Alienware gaming laptop and find the display to be beautiful. YMMV.

                        1. 6

                          Really? I use Windows at work and Linux at home, and I find Windows’ font rendering consistently sub-par. Being relentless with ClearType tuning improves it a bit, but it’s never as good as just the default settings under Gnome.

                          1. 0

                            Perception is a funny thing. Brains are different.

                              1. 1

                                SUPER interesting link! Explains a lot as to why I find Windows font rendering very readable.

                          2. 2

                            It did get a lot better after I upgraded to Cosmic, I updated the article to reflect that. Still no feel like I had on mac though, are you doing anything special?

                            1. 7

                              You’re not gonna ever get something that feels like the Mac.

                              For as much of a tire fire as the Mac has been lately it still has one thing going for it which may be hugely important to you or not at all - every Mac app still conforms to the basic HID guidelines. Cmd-c copies, Cmd-v pastes. Everywhere.

                              It’s really the only platform that does that. Windows does it to a lesser extent. Linux doesn’t do it at ALL. Yet.

                        1. 7

                          it’s just shit not being able to copy in one app and paste in the next if you closed the former.

                          The statement is not correct. Linux has long solved this by implementing clipboard managers. Whether or not you have one depends on your chosen Desktop environment; GNOME and KDE come with a clipboard manager active by default. If the OP uses something different, he’ll have to install one.

                          1. 4

                            You’re correct, I do mention further down the article how I resolved this problem too however. I do think Ubuntu should make this default behavior. Having two clipboards is very unintuitive to me, my mom, and probably more folks :)

                            1. 2

                              I can’t speak to Gnome’s clipboard manager, but KDE’s default manager has options to let you keep the two clipboards synced, so they act like one.

                              1. 1

                                I find it very handy to have two clipboards, most of the time I don’t think about them, second nature, but sometimes I take advantage of having two things copied at the same time.

                                However, I readily admit that I see many colleagues struggling with “getting” that you can copy/paste without using keyboard shortcuts. It irks me to see someone right-clicking and choosing “Copy” or “Paste” from a context menu - if you are using the mouse, use the buttons!

                                It makes sense to me that “the mouse picks up one thing” and “the keyboard stores another”. It must be a habit (never used Windows or macOS in anger myself).