1. 2
    • Eating basically half a portion, nothing after dinner and no alcohol for a year: doesn’t seem like much, but I lost >35kg now and feel much better. Also my bloodwork now vs a year ago is like night and day. Still have ~15kg to go before I’m in the ‘normal’ bracket.

    • Don’t watch the news, read online news maybe twice a week: coupled with the weight loss I feel a lot less stressed out and am in a far better mood in general. I had some anxiety issues but they seem to have faded since.

    1. 1

      I recently started the journey of eating smaller portions and only eating when I’m hungry. Limiting soda/caloric drinks to once a week, and otherwise sparkling water or water.

      One thing I’ve found helpful is drinking a full glass of water before eating and then one afterwards. Slowing down and enjoying food as well seems to help. It’s amazing how “less” hungry I feel.

    1. 1

      Sorry to complain in this thread (i welcome threads like this) but I once posted a video of Alan Kay, who is an incredibly important figure in computing talking about the existential threat of global warming. It was quickly removed by the moderator because they claimed Lobsters is about tech stories and my post was irrelevant to technology (global warming is obviously relevant to the technology industry ).

      Yet here we are talking about nothing related to computing. I suspect people here aren’t taking computing seriously? It’s upsetting that this story gets through but something so obviously related to what we do everyday gets moderated. Is there any reason left to read lobsters?

      1. 2

        Do you remember how it was tagged? I personally enjoy these sort of weekly/thought-provoking posts. Even if indirectly - I think these posts effect folk’s day to day life which in a way effects computing.

        1. 2

          I really enjoy these kinds of posts too. Computing is about people and I want to see more of that.

        2. 2

          I’d say there’s generally an exception made for ask posts as they’re often more community-building in nature.

          1. 2

            Although I agree that:

            global warming is obviously relevant to the technology industry

            It is only tangentially related and there are a lot of tangentially related topics to technology that could be discussed. But if all stories tangentially related to technology were discussed, they could drown out the tech articles, like they do on HackerNews.

            I like that I know I can go to Lobsters and only ever get articles directly related to technology. I think HackerNews already fits the niche for tech and tech related stories.

            1. 1

              Very good response. I have have a couple comments.

              It is only tangentially related

              Do you still want to program computers in 10 to 20 years? I do, so I take global warming very seriously. It seems to be the biggest topic we should be discussing. Will Rust be a programming language we use in 10 years? Well, depends if GW is solved right?

              I think HackerNews already fits the niche for tech and tech related stories.

              I disagree that HN fills that niche. What Lobsters has going for it is being invite only. The discussions should be higher quality here. If you look at the discussions about global warming and how it relates to technology on HN, you still see lots of climate denial. I would not expect that on Lobsters. I would expect we talk about ideas of mitigation, adaptions, and how computers can help solve this huge catastrophie looming over us. You don’t get that discussion on HN as people can’t get beyond the “it’s real” argument.

              We have very prominent people in Tech like Alan Kay who are talking about it and are begging us to talk about it. But the discussion around the topic is so poor in the tech community I’m starting to lose hope.

          1. 9

            I started getting Purple Carrot and HelloFresh. Making time for home cooking has been a lot easier without the daily commute.

            I’m taking full advantage of the current remote-only climate and moving to Colorado without the hassle of changing jobs. I just signed a lease for an apartment that’s 10 minutes from the nearest trailhead. I can’t wait to add morning hikes to my daily routine! My dog loves hiking too, but when I ask if she’s excited to move to Colorado she just looks at me quizzically.

            1. 5

              Your dog is cute, thanks for including that picture!

              1. 6

                Little known fact: she is actually the cutest dog ever.

              2. 2

                I’m also looking at moving to Colorado next year, though I’d just be changing offices as the company I work for has their main office in Boulder. I’m eager to escape the allergies and terrible winters of the Midwest.

                And your dog is adorable!

                1. 1

                  Do it! No time like the present!

                  1. 2

                    No time to move across the country than when you’re young and have no responsibilities

                2. 2

                  You dog is adorable! What breed is she?

                  1. 1

                    Border Collie!

                  2. 2

                    I really enjoyed Colorado when I visited last summer.

                    I went for a concert at Red Rocks, spent a day in CO Springs, and spent a day at Rocky Mountain National Park. I’d really consider living there someday. (We did the hike to Bear Lake -> Dream Lake -> Emerald Lake) It wasn’t anything crazy, but the elevation made it more challenging. Well worth the trip and I’ve been itching to go back!

                  1. 1

                    Neat build! I may have missed it, but do you just have the knob tied to volume?

                    I’ve entered a few group buys recently to try out and ortho-linear build and possibly an ergodox.

                    I haven’t soldered anything before and thought it would be a fun project.

                    Any suggestions on soldering irons? (I was looking at the TS80)

                    1. 1

                      Get the TS80P over the original TS80. Have to have PD, what is even the point of USB-C if you’re going to use QC over it.

                      1. 1

                        Yup! I have one knob mapped to volume. The other currently is mapped to scroll up/down, but that’s just because it was the default. Not sure yet what to map that second knob to…

                        I don’t have any good suggestions for soldering irons, I still have an old no-name one I bought from a hardware store several years ago. Gets the job done!

                        1. 1

                          I made an ErgoDox layout with volume control buttons. When I added the second layer, I came up with the idea of having those keys do screen brightness.

                          There’s a kind of symmetry between the L1 and L2 functionalities IMO, and maybe brightness is something you could try out for the second knob!

                      1. 10

                        Doing some Erlang stuff :)

                        1. 1

                          I always wanted to get into Erlang but it seemed pretty intimidating. I read Learn you some Erlang but never got around to finishing it unfortunately. Hopefully this weekend I could make some time to mess around with it ;)

                          1. 4

                            I’ve always wanted to work with Erlang. Even before it was open sourced I had my supervisor sign an NDA so that I could download it from Ericsson. At the time I saw it as the perfect platform for load balancers and the like. And it was not only me. Members of the Erlang team saw that too (link 1, link 2). But like most people I am not paid for stuff I love to hack with, rather on stuff people who pay think I am good at.

                            I have the book in print too. Mostly for library completeness.

                            So this is a 20 year long slow process for me.

                            1. 3

                              Go check it out! It’s my favorite programming language. It gets the functional parts right, the data structures right, the network & RPC primitives right… It’s a lot of fun. Build a small thing with it. I never found that book very helpful.

                              1. 1

                                I am evaluating Erlang for use in a professional project, so I have been spending some time learning it. I’ve been going through the Getting Started Guide from Erlang.org, and I’ve found it is actually very approachable and helpful just going through each example. Going through a whole book was too much for me right now.

                                1. 2

                                  Your link to getting started is a little messed up (here it is fixed) https://erlang.org/doc/getting_started/users_guide.html

                                  I’ve always had an interest in Erlang, but like most languages I’m never sure what to build :/

                            1. 4

                              Just yesterday I build my first 3D printer. So I guess I am going to play around with it.

                              Hopefully I find the time to blog about it as well.

                              1. 4

                                That’s awesome! Which one did you end up going with?

                                1. 1

                                  I thought about build a Hypercube Evolution. But I thought it would be wise to start of easier and maybe smaller. So I bought the new Prusa MINI. I am so happy right now. We’ll see how long I am fine with 18cmx18cmx18cm prints :)

                              1. 3

                                On my VPS:

                                1. 1

                                  How do you like cloudmacs? I enjoyed using org mode for work/school/life, but keeping it on multiple machines and synced properly made me stop using it.

                                  1. 1

                                    I like it! (I’m the author :D )

                                    On my computers/phones I use syncthing (also used Dropbox previously) and it works perfectly.

                                    The reason for cloudmacs is that sometimes I need access to my org-mode files where I don’t have SSH client or even Emacs.

                                    1. 1

                                      Oh! I didn’t even make the connection at first - Awesome!!

                                      Do you use Emacs/Cloudmacs for everything or mainly just org?

                                      Is Syncthing used for keeping your org files across devices, or for configs and such?

                                      I tried to only keep one org file, but it got cluttered (even though I separated out work/non-work) and I didn’t really change and defaults since I was trying to use it on 3-4 different machines

                                      1. 1

                                        Emacs – most of plaintext editing and most of my coding. Cloudmacs – mostly for accessing org-mode and hotfixing html for my blog when I’m not near my laptop.

                                        I sync pretty much all my files with Syncthing (apart from really heavy stuff like photos/huge binaries/etc).

                                        I’ve got lots of org-mode files, with org-refile/projectile and search it’s all pretty manageable!

                                1. 2

                                  Interview this week (excited!). Lots of cool stuff going on at $current_gig too. Buddy is in town unexpectedly, and Death Stranding comes out on Friday.

                                  Would like to try sketching a Cheney style GC and trying it out. Seems like one of those beautiful hacks everyone needs to at least try once.

                                  Gonna be a fast and crazy week. I can feel it.

                                  1. 1

                                    Goodluck @ the interview!

                                    How did you end up preparing for it?

                                    1. 1

                                      Skimming some compiler books and reviewing my resume. Given the vast subject area it was hard to cover enough for the time allotted, so I did my best.

                                    2. 1

                                      Death Stranding comes out on Friday

                                      I’d love to hear your thoughts on this game. Reviews have it as either 0/10 or 10/10. So split.

                                      1. 1

                                        Death Stranding is Kojima’s Yeezus.

                                        1. 1

                                          Kojima Unchained

                                    1. 8

                                      Taking the train from NYC back to Houston after finishing up at Recurse Center. So many feels.

                                      1. 2

                                        I’d be very curious to hear your reflections on it should you ever write them up!

                                        1. 1

                                          Second that.

                                        2. 1

                                          3rd that!

                                        1. 2

                                          Now that most of the dust has settled from one of my coworkers moving to a new company I am finally able to work on some new stuff. This means I get to write some new code and try some new stuff using Azure (specifically functions). I’m pretty excited to try out some new stuff I’ve never had the opportunity to work with before.

                                          1. 3

                                            I ordered from a linux/bsd shop, they do exist, told them I wanted silence and lots of screens, and got a tiny Shuttle thing that Just Worked. I have three screens connected and the PC itself sits on a shelf, quite far from my ears.

                                            The combination “linux/bsd shop” and “shuttle” has been great.

                                            1. 2

                                              Your link is broken btw

                                              1. 2

                                                I guessed a single, letter typo. Probably meant ixsoft.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Right. Sorry.

                                            1. 1
                                              at home
                                              • small media server (lenovo thinkcentre purchased open-box)
                                                • plex
                                                • transmission-daemon
                                              • pi
                                              vps (from ssdnodes)
                                              • email (postfix, dovecot, rspamd)
                                              • nextcloud
                                              • url shortener (running polr)
                                              • irc stuff
                                                • ircd node for tilde.chat
                                                • always-on weechat with relay proxied through nginx
                                              dedi (from hetzner)
                                              1. 1

                                                I’ve seen stuff about tilde club posted around here before - how active is it these days?

                                                1. 2

                                                  i can’t speak for tilde.club, but tilde.team sure is! tilde.town is also quite active as well.

                                                  there’s also a relatively new effort to collaborate between the ‘tildes’ which mostly includes an irc network and a handful of self-hosted services.

                                              1. 3

                                                Quite a bit! I have the following bits of software running on a decent VPS at DigitalOcean:

                                                • Wallabag to hold all of the stuff I’d like to read later without all of the extra fluff on a Webpage.
                                                • Nextcloud with a few apps added like:
                                                • An instance of Drone CI for personal/private project builds.
                                                • Matomo for all of my analytics.
                                                • My own Minetest server - e-mail / DM me for an invite to play!
                                                • Isso for self-hosted comments to my website.
                                                • A ZNC bouncer; so many servers!
                                                • Gitea for all of my projects. I host here first then mirror elsewhere.
                                                • Minio for self-hosted object storage; largely for testing my software.
                                                • My own instance of PeerTube so I can sync and share videos.

                                                I should make this into a dedicated page at https://jacky.wtf, lol; I get asked this often enough for me to do so.

                                                1. 3

                                                  What size/spec Droplet(s) do you use over at DO for all of this?

                                                  1. 1

                                                    The exact “tag” is s-2vcpu-2gb; the one with flexible storage. I’ve also attached a 100GB volume to the image as well.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      60GB image with 2GB of RAM hanging out in SFO2

                                                  2. 2

                                                    I didn’t know about wallbag till today. Sounds like an interesting alternate to Pocket

                                                    Thanks!

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I wonder if we could remove the linux tag, since the question can be answered by more than those who run Linux. :)

                                                    On my various HardenedBSD servers, I host:

                                                    • gitea
                                                    • bitlbee
                                                    • kanboard
                                                    • NFS

                                                    Each service is in its own jail just to keep things organized. Some services have a Tor v3 Onion Service associated with them.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I only applied the ‘linux’ tag since it wouldn’t allow me to only supply ‘ask’. (and the previous post did the same)

                                                      1. 3

                                                        Ah, gotcha. I didn’t know specifying a secondary tag was required. Thanks for the clarification!

                                                    1. 9

                                                      I’m putting the final touches on an update of my book, Practical Elm, and I also wrote an intro to a package for creating complex forms in Elm (https://korban.net/posts/elm/2018-11-27-build-complex-forms-validation-elm).

                                                      EDIT: I’ve also helped restart Elm Weekly as one of the new maintainers. Check it out if you’re interested in Elm: elmweekly.nl

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Having not touched Elm (or heard much about it) - any thoughts as to why I should/might take a look at it? :)

                                                        1. 2

                                                          There are a few different reasons off the top of my head:

                                                          • It can be a relatively easy introduction to functional programming in a statically typed language
                                                          • If you already use JavaScript, it gives you a different perspective on dealing with state and data flow
                                                          • There is an Elm package which allows you to step away from HTML/CSS and write your UI code in pure Elm; I think it’s a very interesting experiment and I wrote up an introduction to it. Again, you can use it to broaden your perspective on how web UIs can be constructed
                                                          • It has a time-travelling debugger, which isn’t something widely available in other languages
                                                          • It’s also an experiment in different approaches to building the community and evolving the language. It’s starkly different to the constant churn in the JavaScript world
                                                          • There are at least dozens, and possibly over a hundred companies already using it in production.
                                                      1. 2

                                                        At home, I’ve been playing with Fuchsia, working on porting a toy Haskell web service to Rust, and trying to work through two Udacity courses on self-driving cars and neural networks.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          The name of your web service interested me. What all does it currently do?

                                                          1. 2

                                                            The web service itself operates on (presumably WGS84) coordinates stored in SQLite. It accepts new coordinates via a POST interface and retrieves the latest coordinate from the database. The web UI uses the HTML5 geolocation API to post your current location. There’s a couple of TODO items, too.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Ah cool! So are you planning to use it to track/update your location to show “where you are”?

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I’m sort of building out my own Google assistant sort of thing, so it’s mostly to be able to correlate location with other things in a first-party sort of service. As of now, it’s single user. In the future I might expand it out to share single waypoints or a range of points. It’s probably the first web service I (with a systems engineering background) have really been interested in building, so it’s also as much a chance to play with something useful and take it in a bunch of different directions.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Pretty awesome!

                                                          2. 1

                                                            The Fuchsia part interests me (I do not currently have time to do something more practical with it but have read a lot on the design and code), do care to elaborate on some of your experiences? Is it on real hardware or in a VM?

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I spent a while trying to get it on a T440s from about 2014, and I couldn’t get the EFI to map the memory correctly. I haven’t had a whole lot of time to dig into it, but I’ve been really tempted to put it on my pixelbook. I do have it running in qemu, too, but I so much prefer to have real hardware.

                                                          1. 5
                                                            • Spent last week in San Francisco training at the new job, which is off to a very good start, though the city was pretty bleak because of the wildfire smoke. My intuition for code/infrastructure has been shaped by a 20-year career solo or on small teams, so seeing what a team of hundreds can build has left me in a constant state of awe. I’m a hick visiting the big city and it’s pretty great. The way we’re drawing the line between them and my outside projects (Lobsters, podcast, etc.) is that we’re not going to talk about each other in public. This week is more training and getting used to macOS, which I last used in 1992 on an LC II pizza box. (Spoiler: Infinitely frustrating.)
                                                            • Scheduling interviews for the first couple podcast eps.
                                                            • Thanksgiving! I’m on desserts, so probably going to make ice cream and maybe a pie.
                                                            1. 1

                                                              This week is more training and getting used to macOS, which I last used in 1992 on an LC II pizza box. (Spoiler: Infinitely frustrating.)

                                                              I miss classic Mac OS, too.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Were you located in Chicago previously? (maybe you still are) Do you consider SF “bigger” than Chicago? Just curious as I’ve only been to Chicago.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I have almost always been in Chicago. SF feels like it’s the density of Milwaukee with the prices of Manhattan. (So: significantly smaller.) I’ve enjoyed my two visits and hope to get more time to play tourist, but it would take incredible incentives to prompt me to relocate.

                                                                2. 1

                                                                  I had to get used to macOS again too for the job I started in August. It’s… weird. And infinitely frustrating is a good description.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Hm, as an organiser of many meetups: I like this, but I’d prefer it to not encourage more meetups to serve pizza.

                                                                  (I have no issue with pizza per se, but moving beyond the “pizza & beer” monoculture important)

                                                                  1. 5

                                                                    Hey now, everyone loves pizza! It’s versatile, readily available, easily eaten without utensils, and can serve most niches for people with dietary requirements or taste preferences. (Beer, on the other hand…)

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      I do even agree with your points! Pizza is the easiest food to quickly get on short notice with a wide variety of variants. This is not a “I hate pizza and you should feel bad for ever serving it”.

                                                                      But everyone loves pizza until all you serve is pizza. You’d be surprised how much positive response you get when you finally run something with other food.

                                                                      Also, with caterers taking note of meetups as a target, other food gets close to pizza when it comes to convenience and price. Usually, they serve a rolling menu where you can only pick what’s available at that night.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        Oh, totally agreed that too much of a good thing is a bad thing. More variety would be nice - at least pizza places offer non-pizza things if that’s your only option.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Hmm what are some other things that you would like to server in place of pizza? Other dishes such as pasta/salads? (I can’t think of a good replacement)

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            One meetup in Chicago does empanadas and those work pretty well. I’ve also seen burritos go over well.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Those both sound like good ideas - I guess it really depends on location as well.

                                                                            2. 2

                                                                              For larger things, curry/rice is a great alternative that can easily cover many food styles. Bagels are also awesome.

                                                                              For smaller meetups, any buffet can be made affordable or even be prepared yourself with a short trip to the supermarket and 15 minutes of cutting and slicing.

                                                                              If you have enough money, any city has a lot of small scale caterers, though they tend to cost a little more then pizza. (Not much, but it may be prohibitive) At least in Germany, getting some food from the restaurant around the corner is usually possible, even if they don’t officially cater. If they are close, they might even bring stuff up to your offer and lend you plates. This definitely becomes easier if you are always at the same location.

                                                                              My rule of thumb: go to a local sports club, see what they do ;).

                                                                          2. 1

                                                                            I suspect you’ve never tried to eat vegan, gluten-free pizza.

                                                                          3. 2

                                                                            I’ve gotten some feedback on some of the events I run that having non-pizza options was definitely a thing. I started running one event out of the venue space in a bar, and that’s worked quite well. Lots of food/beverage options there.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Yep. There’s lots of way to solve it. I want meetup organisers to be creative. (also, I want meetup organisers not to spend too much time, it may become exhausting)

                                                                            2. 1

                                                                              In my previous company (which just raised money) we had trouble to find other “sponsors”, so we tried not to put the usual pizza and beer stuff. The result is that less people came because they had to come back late at home without eating and going to the restaurant for a meetup was too expensive.

                                                                              We finally setup for the pizza and very few beers, but it felt like people preferred the catering than the talks…

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                Oh, food is important, I just want variety.

                                                                              2. 1

                                                                                Pizza isn’t the most healthy, but hey, John Carmack didn’t develop Doom ordering chinese takeout every night :p

                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  BRB, registering the “John Carmack Meetup”, where everyone is John Carmack.

                                                                                  It isn’t as much about health. Eating Pizza once a month is fine and if you visit meetups so often that their choice of meal becomes a health issue, you should probably reconsider your meetup habit before your food habit.

                                                                              1. 8

                                                                                My two cents: find a way to make remote work maintainable for you.

                                                                                1. 5

                                                                                  Agreed.

                                                                                  I’ve looked at coworking spaces, but finaicially it’s not a possibility right now. The company also will not reimburse for it.

                                                                                  They might change their tune if they knew that not having a coworking space is making you consider leaving the company. If you can make it clear that this is a requirement for your job and the alternative is hiring someone else, then in most cases they will pay for it.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    I’ve never really considered this way of thinking.

                                                                                    I would assume most companies would just view you as dead weight or an extra cost (why give this remote worker money to co-work when I am saving money by not having them in the office)

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      It depends on how replaceable you are of course, but the cost of training a replacement for many folks who write and operate software is very high, so people are incentivized to avoid that kind of disruption.

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        I agree completely! I suppose I’m just jaded from previous jobs where most people had left until it was only contractors left (no full time employees left)

                                                                                  2. 3

                                                                                    is that because you think the startup opportunity is too good to walk away from? or remote work is too good to walk away from? or a combo?

                                                                                    1. 10

                                                                                      I’m not /u/zpojqwfejwfhiunz, but I agree with him on this.

                                                                                      Being remote gives you a lot of flexibilty, and there are quite a few ways to work outside of the house that don’t have to involve being in a co-working space, such as coffee shops or parks. This may not work as well on meeting days, but it is worth investigating. Also, if you’ve not been taking advantage of working remotely, maybe start trying to get creative about flexing those privileges.

                                                                                      Does your current company pay for you to visit them once in a while? Are you living with anyone? Can you have pets in your current housing? Do you have regular social contact with people that will help you grow? I know for me, working remote allowed me to move closer to family and friends I hadn’t seen in a long time, which did far more to attack the problem of lonliness than working in an office did. I moved 1300 miles to pull that off. Perhaps that sort of move might make sense for you?

                                                                                      I would attack the lonliness angle from outside of work before I would switch to working at a local company, and I’d do a lot of research on the local company before I switched. Maybe make a friend or acquaintance there via a shared social gathering, or the like, and get a sense of what the company politics are like, or if people there like the company culture. It sounds like you have great co-workers, that’s not something to be set aside lightly.

                                                                                      In other words, take advantage of working remotely to be able to surround yourself with people that will build you up. If you can’t figure out a way to make that work (and you have been working remotely for 4 years, so that seems quite possible), then I’d consider working in an office, but not before.

                                                                                      1. 9

                                                                                        such as coffee shops or parks

                                                                                        …and libraries!

                                                                                        Libraries are so undervalued it’s unreal. I’ve been working remotely for the past 4/5 years, and while I do sometimes work from cafés, there is an implicit social pressure to keep buying things to justify taking up a table. No such problem with a library. If you’re in a big city, these can be incredibly beautiful buildings too.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          Thats such an amazing idea. If I go remote this would be my main place to work at. Its such a nice building but I rarely have a reason to go there.

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            Thats such an amazing idea. If I go remote this would be my main place to work at. Its such a nice building but I rarely have a reason to go there.

                                                                                            It’s cool, I’ve tried it - only downside is private rooms for calls are not always around.

                                                                                        2. 4

                                                                                          thanks for the well thought out reply!

                                                                                          • certainly going to attempt working outside a bit more
                                                                                          • social contact with others seems to be a common thread, not currently doing much of that
                                                                                          • approaching the local company from the inside makes a lot of sense
                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            Yeah, when you’re working remotely, being able to fill your social needs outside of work is key.

                                                                                            In some ways, you could view it as an advantage of working remote. After all, you don’t have a commute, that frees up some of that time to be spent elsewhere. Be intentional about spending it elsewhere.

                                                                                            1. 4

                                                                                              Along these lines, I personally find that limiting media consumption is critical. It’s better to force yourself to be bored than to always have the TV on or be staring at a screen. That boredom will force you to find other hobbies. Ideally, you’d find at least one athletic hobby, and at least one social hobby.

                                                                                    1. 10

                                                                                      When I first started working remote I also got really lonely. It’s a real thing that I think is overlooked too often. People fail to take into account how effectively being alone impacts your mental health. I found that chatting online and video calls just aren’t the same as actually being in the same room/space as people.

                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                        I had the exact same experience and switching from home to co-working space changed everything. I felt that I had “colleagues” even if not working at all for the same company. I rediscovered that the “coffee time” wasn’t about coffee but about socializing.

                                                                                        I cannot stress enough that having a clear distinction from working space and personal space is really important.

                                                                                        1. 8

                                                                                          I have the opposite experience. I work remotely from my kitchen, and I can spend days without talking to or seeing anyone. No “cabin fever,” whatever that means. I kinda miss coffee table socializing, but only a little bit. In fact such socializing can be quite painful & awkward for me, and I’m glad I no longer feel the obligation to join up at a coffee table..

                                                                                          I checked out some coworking spaces and my employer said they’d cover the bills but at this point I don’t really see many benefits to it (they don’t even offer free coffee.. I’d reconsider if there was a good coffee maker that goes straight from beans to brew). There are definite downsides, such as the commute. And having to lug hardware back and forth if you don’t plan to always work from the coworking space.

                                                                                          Now, being lonely can be a problem but my experience is that obligatory lunch/coffee table time with coworkers doesn’t fix it. Time with family or good friends would fix it.

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            Very interesting to read someone having the opposite feeling and experience!

                                                                                            I found that having to commute also helped to put rythm in my day and have justification for being in town and see friends before going back home. Isn’t it something that you miss?

                                                                                            What your routine like? Do you wake up, have breakfast and stay in the kitchen the whole day for work? Or do you have a more fragmented day?

                                                                                            1. 5

                                                                                              What your routine like? Do you wake up, have breakfast and stay in the kitchen the whole day for work? Or do you have a more fragmented day?

                                                                                              There are plenty of interviews posted on https://remotehabits.com/ with questions similar to these. I’m not affiliated with them. I just find the site useful enough to post a link.

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                Thanks that’s a great resource to get new ideas and improve remote days!

                                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                                I found that having to commute also helped to put rythm in my day and have justification for being in town and see friends before going back home. Isn’t it something that you miss?

                                                                                                No friends. Spending time in town was never really a thing for me. My onsite jobs have always been on the outskirts of town or in the middle of nowhere (e.g. in a monastery). When I had to commute to town (for school), I’d always head straight home anyway.

                                                                                                What your routine like? Do you wake up, have breakfast and stay in the kitchen the whole day for work? Or do you have a more fragmented day?

                                                                                                I get up at around 8:55 am, get dressed, brush teeth, sign in on work laptop at 9:05 or so and start working, with a cup of coffee. I might go out and buy something on the lunch break, or I might quickly grab something from the fridge and maybe take a little nap afterwards. Lunch breaks end up taking 45 to 60 minutes. I log out sometime around 17:30, give or take 15 minutes. It’s been a very regular routine so far.

                                                                                                It works pretty well, though I’d like to get in the habit of starting a little earlier (8:00-8:30), keep the lunch break under 45 mins and get more of that evening for myself.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  I have it somewhat similar to DuClare. I visit the place about once per week, taking with me an Intel Skull Canyon NUC, and that’s about the right frequency for me. Traffic jams, parking and people get on my nerves, even if I get over the awkwardness of meeting a subset of coworkers. No real life friends to speak of, too.

                                                                                                  I do not have any routine, other than a mild morning coffee. When I feel like it, I do 200 hours a month, when I don’t, I do way less and focus on personal projects. Life is short, don’t do what you hate.

                                                                                                2. 3

                                                                                                  For the cost of a months membership you can get a pretty amazing coffee setup at home.

                                                                                                  I order green beans online (dirt cheap and they keep for years), then roast (40 minutes every few weeks), and grind (this is the most expensive part; spend $300 or more on the grinder).

                                                                                                  After that an aeropress or stovetop espresso maker is fine (comparable automatic machines cost many hundreds).

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    Man, the difference between what they call coffee at work and my basic coffee machine with decent beans… I can’t drink that disgusting shit at work without sugar. And they’ve already changed both the machine and the coffee beans supplier. I just don’t understand.

                                                                                              3. 3

                                                                                                Agreed. I’ve been working full-time remote for almost four years now. The first year was great. But since then, I’ve noticed a distinct loneliness about it, and I miss interacting with my co-workers more directly. It certainly isn’t for everyone. That said, it has allowed me a great deal of freedom to live exactly where I wanted to live, and I wouldn’t trade that for the world.

                                                                                                In the meantime, I’ve recently started co-working at a local co-working facility, and I enjoy getting out of the house a few days a week. It makes a big difference.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  This is my experience too. I’ve been remote for a little more than 2.5 years now, and I’m feeling emotionally drained because working from home alone all day just sucks. The freedom is great, but I don’t know that it’s worth it.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    How much does your space charge per month and does your company cover any of that cost?

                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                      This so much. I’m going thru a 4 year “can i do this forever” period. sigh.