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      yeah, why?

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        its the blog post:

        This happened not before trying to convince @Unknwon about giving write permissions to more people, among the community. He rightly considered Gogs his own creature and didn’t want to let it grow outside of him, thus a fork was necessary in order to set that code effectively free.

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          Looks like there was some minor drama in the Gogs world and that the primary developer of that project was away for a while. Since nobody could push changes they forked the project. An issue on the Gogs Github seems to indicate the protects have differing philosophies now.

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            Looks to me like your typical governance fork, like with ØMQ/nanoMSG, egcs/gcc, eglibc/glibc. I would bet on the fork with a more open community.

            Here’s what happened with ØMQ (but in reverse, name-wise):

            http://hintjens.com/blog:93

            http://sealedabstract.com/rants/nanomsg-postmortem-and-other-stories/

            People over code, the best is the enemy of the good, worse is better. Instead of being conservative, accept more input from the community, grow and breathe enthusiasm into the community. Any warts introduced by one contributor will be polished by another.

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          Persistent reservations… shudder.

          Very neat to see this all written up in go, though it’s a bit lost on me what the exact use case is for this code.

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            It can export the network block device to user, work as a scsi/iscsi library package. Now, longhorn from openebs is working on this.

            Or all codes are implemented by golang on userland, you can modify and test it more easily than LIO or SCST. Compared with tgt which is first scsi target implemented on userland, this gotgt works on any platform, I think this is more easy to hand. And we will plan to implement more features to make it more dazzled.

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              So largely the use case for this is people who develop scsi initiators? That’s very neat, but was not obvious from my reading of everything.

              Good luck with everything, wish I could help more.

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            Seeing the list, I have two potential reactions:

            “Wow. That’s a big list. Good luck trying to do all that…”

            “That’s a pretty, small list given all the stuff that could’ve showed up. Might represent what the masses trying to learn stuff encounter or deal with the most. FOSS writers might get best impact vs time invested ratio by thoroughly tackling those topics.”

            Leaning toward the latter.

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              I suppose this list is for kernel developer, any engineer which work with linux is hard to hand the words, such as: * the kernel * btrfs * kpatch, kgraph, kexec

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              Is this a framework for erlang?

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                You can probably think of Lasp as an experiment in figuring out ways to make it easier to build distributed systems. It’s implemented as an Erlang library but, as @adsouza said, it isn’t explicitly tied to the Erlang VM.

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                  The prototype is implemented as a an Erlang library but the model itself isn’t tied to any one language.

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                    How does this differ from boot2docker? Why might I prefer Hyper?

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                      There are few differences between Hyper and boot2docker: 1- Docker commands are run inside the boot2docker VM and not directly on the host

. Hyper daemon directly runs on your Mac. 2- When using boot2docker, each time you restart the VM, you have to manually mount the drives (and reinstall Fig if you’re using it) 3- While boot2docker is a “wrapper” around Docker and VirtualBox, Hyper for Mac is part of the whole Hyper ecosystem, providing a similar environment on Linux, or Mac OS X.