1. 1

    Pretty solid. I was recently tasked with reverse engineering some binary file format and if the creator had used half of these hints I’d been a happier person :P

    1. 1

      I’m in a similar boat, where the file uses exactly none of these aside from values being consistently little-endian. Of course the article was written a decade or so after this format was designed though…

    1. 1

      In some game tournaments they will use CRTs for their better response time. Super Smash Bros comes to mind but I’m sure they did (do?) it for other fighting games.

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        It’s interesting that podcasts as a medium have been able to somewhat eschew this shitty new paradigm. I wonder why that is.

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          The article talks about this.

          Madrigal suggested that the newest successful media bundle is the podcast. Perhaps that’s why podcasts have surged in popularity and why you find such a refreshing mixture of breadth and depth in that form: Individual episodes don’t matter; what matters is getting subscribers. You can occasionally whiff, or do something weird, and still be successful.

          Imagine if podcasts were Twitterized in the sense that people cut up and reacted to individual segments, say a few minutes long. The content marketplace might shift away from the bundle—shows that you subscribe to—and toward individual fragments. The incentives would evolve toward producing fragments that get Likes. If that model came to dominate, such that the default was no longer to subscribe to any podcast in particular, it seems obvious that long-running shows devoted to niches would starve.

          1. 1

            Yes, I was referring to that bit in the article. To clarify, I meant that I wonder why podcasts have been able to mostly avoid being “Twitterized”.

            1. 3

              Seems like technical limitations make it difficult to share segments in isolation; it’s difficult and awkward to share a URL to a specific point of time in a recording.

              1. 2

                Podcasts have a different target market. Tweets / IG posts / outrage clickbait are targeted at “interstitial moments” - breaks, waiting for the bus, standing in the checkout line. Podcasts appeal to captive audiences - commuters, exercisers, people with jobs where they’re stuck in one place but have to use their hands to manipulate machinery.

                I think you’re painting podcast quality in too bright a light though. There’s some very good, well researched and produced content, but most of it is “talk radio” - engaging personalities who riff off each other, snark, and appealing to a shared ideal or prejudice.

            2. 2

              Partly it could be is that RSS (what podcasts are made on) doesn’t have a standard for comments or likes.

            1. 3

              End-Of-Life: 31 May 2029

              1. 3

                What ever happened to 10 year support!

                1. 2

                  I’d guess that’s the EOL of RHEL 8. 9.5 year support will have to do I suppose…

              1. 3

                Most headsets aren’t really ready for interacting with small text for extended periods yet. The Rift S is usable for in-game interfaces, and the screen-door effect isn’t very noticable, but there’s always a “sweet spot” you need to find with headset adjustment to make text legible, and it’s not really as comfortable as just looking at a regular monitor.

                Maybe the HP Reverb is approaching usable, but I haven’t tried it. I’m excited at the possibilities but still skeptical short-term.

                1. 1

                  Yeah, something that makes me less sanguine than I was previously is a comment by Carmack in last year’s Oculus keynote where he says that previously phones were driving small displays to be better and better, but now they’ve reached a point where quality improvements go unnoticed by consumers, so “VR companies will have to foot the bill” for higher PPI screens.

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                  Good idea to get people to break it. I heard about Sneklang a little while ago and thought it sounded quite useful.

                  Are there any APIs to execute Sneklang from other languages yet? Like if I have a C# program that allows users to enter input in Sneklang, then executes it and uses the results within the program.

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                    I think I’ll make a CLI for it at some point, maybe let it read to stdin and print to stdout…

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                    I use an 8 year old Thinkpad X220 every day and the only upgrades are a solid state drive, linux and some extra RAM (which I need because some of my datasets are obnoxiously large and I keep too many tabs open).

                    It would be real nice to have a better screen, though.

                    1. 4

                      If you are comfortable with soldering, I highly recommend this mod to add support for a 1080p display. I did this mod about 9 months ago to my X230 and I’m so glad I did.

                      1. 1

                        I’ve let my X220 get so bashed up that I should probably buy a new one to do the mod in.

                        I suppose I could put the mod in this and then take it out again later if this laptop ever dies, but I’m kinda bad at soldering, so I’m not sure that’s likely ;)

                        1. 2

                          The last time I looked (~1 year ago) there were still a surprising number of X220 and X230 laptops for sale on ebay some as cheap as $100. I picked up an X230 to use for spare parts.

                          The mod was a little tricky to solder, especially getting the solder to sink down the through-holes to hit the pins sticking out of the motherboard. I ended up re-applying solder 3 times to finally get good connections there. The previous attempts seemed to work but then the display would cut out after using it for a few hours, or moving it, etc. Other than that, it has been solid ever since (I run Linux on it, not windows, so I cannot speak to the windows experience..)

                          1. 2

                            As if I use Windows ;)

                            Know about the ebay sales. Thanks for the insight on the soldering experience, though. Might come in handy.

                            1. 2

                              Heh, I didn’t check your profile before replying. Sorry for insinuating you might use windows :P

                        2. 1

                          Thank you for posting this. A while back I had only seen the mod for the X220 and there was uncertainty about whether something similar would emerge for the X230. Finally I might be free of the only part of this laptop that I don’t care for…

                        3. 3

                          Thinkpad w530 here, great machine. Similar, SSD, add ram, linux. The Thinkpad driver for linux situation has alway been great.

                          1. 2

                            Adding an SSD makes a lot of sense, since the bottleneck for performance is rarely the CPU & usually the disk.

                          2. 3

                            Pretty much the same. 6 year old X230, no SSD, Linux, and extra RAM. The only thing I miss is a better screen. And I frequently use a much less powerful laptop than this one when I want to save some weight (an ASUS eeePC 1015).

                            1. 2

                              My T420 has been great so far. They’re about $230-250 on eBay. Supports most OS’s.

                            1. 1

                              What in the world are people doing using exceptions as lock objects? Is that really a thing?

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                                Users are now able to save and (automatically) restore complete multi-display configurations, which is especially helpful for those who frequently connect their laptop to varying docking stations or setups.

                                YES, FINALLY!

                                1. 3

                                  Nice. I’ve been using Xubuntu as my daily driver for years now and my major gripe with it is the incredibly bad multi-head support. Which is a problem for me because I dock and undock my laptop many times a day. I have to be careful to undock the laptop before putting it to sleep because the session will freeze if it wakes up with fewer displays than it had while awake. To say nothing of the total lack of sanity in the window manager when displays are added and removed. I’ve tried a bunch of other desktop environments but XFCE gets everything else so right that it’s hard to switch away.

                                  Sounds like they’re making headway on that front finally. Can’t wait to try it out.

                                  1. 1

                                    I honestly don’t mind having to pull up ARandr and select “Work”, “Living Room”, etc manually when I plug into an external display. I also have been using the Xfce4 Panel Switch to go from work (panel on my second screen) and just the natural single panel.

                                    I’m fine with doing this but I can see it deterring a lot of other users. So I welcome this change!

                                    1. 2

                                      Also, if you do mind, look into autorandr. It’s a minimalist, window-manager-agnostic tool to automatically set screen layouts when you connect or disconnect displays.

                                      1. 1

                                        Will it set the display to my left when I’m at work and then to the right when I’m in the living room? I haven’t actually ever looked into doing anything like this automatically.

                                        1. 2

                                          I believe it recognizes the specific monitors you have it hooked up to, so yes. I’ve actually only used it at work where the possible settings are “laptop” and “docked”, though, so I can’t say for sure from experience.

                                  1. 2

                                    Wow, I had no idea Mullvad was even working on anything like this. That’s great.

                                      1. 1

                                        Less fingers are required if you use evil-mode or god-mode :)

                                        1. 3

                                          Depends on which god… if you have an HP Lovecraft inspired emacs user then https://i.imgur.com/pznqq35.jpg

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                                        One of the biggest benefits I’ve received from Emacs is being able to work in the same environment regardless of the OS I’m running. It’s not perfect on Windows but it sure makes living in M$-land at work and Linux-land at home much easier.

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                                          Although it’s certainly quirky, eshell is a great portable shell for the vast majority of what I do, and it works equally well on Linux as on Windows. I especially like how I can use my Emacs editing functionality right in my shell.

                                          For those of you who use Emacs but haven’t learned eshell yet (like me until a few months ago) this guide is a very good resource.

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                                            Regarding “quirky”, I sometimes wonder if it is because I’m used to classical vt100 terminal emulators, such as xterm and the GNOME Terminal + curses based shells such as bash, that makes me see eshell as weird, or what the reason is. Another explanation would be it’s insufficient-well handling of certain escape codes that some programs emit (color, line-updates, etc.).

                                            Just recently I rewatched Russ Cox’ A Tour of the Acme Editor, where he mentions that he never needed a shell with a history, since Acme’s win (similarly to eshell and all other comint-modes) support editing the session as a regular buffer. Maybe if (actually better) mode of interaction were more widespread, I wouldn’t find it so wierd (but cool), as I do now.

                                            Oh an btw, “Eshell as a main shell” is also a great article on this topic.

                                            1. 3

                                              The “editor buffer as shell” concept was used in Macintosh Programmer’s Workshop, where I spent several intense years, and I still really miss that interaction style. I guess it’s originally from Smalltalk (which I also miss).

                                              …an MPW worksheet is always in visual editing mode and can be freely reorganized by its user. Hence a worksheet can be purely a command script or purely a text document or a mixture of the two—an integrated document describing the history, maintenance procedures and test results of a software project.

                                              For each project I was working on, I had an ongoing document with a rich collection of relevant commands, all just a “cmd-enter/cmd-Z” away.

                                          2. 5

                                            One of the biggest benefits I’ve received from Emacs is being able to work in the same environment regardless of the OS I’m running.

                                            FWIW VS Code is the same, it runs nicely on every platform I care about at the moment (Windows 2008 -, mainstream distros.)

                                            What it lacks that emacs has seems to be even more extensions of all kinds.

                                            1. 16

                                              What it lacks that emacs has seems to be even more extensions of all kinds.

                                              The ‘lack’ of extensions in VSCode more of a ‘symptom’. What it lacks is more fundamental. VSCode hasn’t been designed from the ground up to be extended on the fly. Quoting the article

                                              Eventually I would write Elisp casually in between programming on work projects. I would notice that a way of working was repetitive, or that Emacs behaved in a way I just didn’t quite like, or I simply thought of a nice thing that I could add. I’d happily spend anywhere from 30 seconds to half an hour writing some functionality to extend my editing facilities.

                                              The important difference is on the fly. VSCode has certainly been designed with extensibility in mind and it has some impressive extensions, like their vim extension calls neovim for the ex commands

                                              1. 3

                                                Some really good points, thanks.

                                                Maybe VS Code could need some good scripting/macro capabilities?

                                                I remember jEdit used to have back when it was my preferred editor (~2003-2006).

                                                1. 7

                                                  Phrasing it as “scriping/macro capabilities” makes me think you’re still approaching this from the wrong direction; it sounds like you’re still thinking the editor itself should be a fixed core, and then maybe some of the plumbing around it can be extensible.

                                                  To reach Emacs levels of extensibility, you need to start not with an editor. You need to forget all about the editor to begin with. You start only with a tiny virtual machine that runs future editor extensions – even before there is an editor. Then you build the entire editor in terms of those extensions.

                                                2. 2

                                                  Yes, this is a very important point. I have also been patching these minor annoyances every now and then for a while, and also started contributing my fixes back to the original projects. It only just recently dawned on me that this would not have been feasible for me to do with practically any other editor. I had taken it for granted, but I realise now how privileged I am for being able to do that to my editor of choice.

                                                  (As a side effect, it’s also had me starting to re-investigate what I think my opinions should be on the whole GPL vs ISC licence.)

                                                3. 6

                                                  You can run emacs without any graphical environment (e.g. when working on a headless server), but I’m fairly certain (as someone who has never touched vs code) that vs code cannot do that. Most distros package emacs, is that also the case with vs code?

                                                  1. 2

                                                    You can run emacs without any graphical environment (e.g. when working on a headless server), but I’m fairly certain (as someone who has never touched vs code) that vs code cannot do that.

                                                    That is my understanding as well. On normal nix systems thought I typically don’t edit code on the server, and Windows systems have GUIs.

                                                    Most distros package emacs, is that also the case with vs code?

                                                    More or less it seems. I guess (but don’t know) it is not available in the default repos of Red Hat 7 but between exe, snap, appimages (again, educated guess) and precompiled binaries that are easy to untar into ~/bin and use (after submitting them to virustotal ; ) it is now easy to use it everywhere I need it.

                                                  2. 3

                                                    I recently started using VSCode to debug .NET Core code. While it is definitely more extensible than VS, I think comparing it with Emacs is apples and oranges. I don’t know of anything like Tramp or Magit in the VSCode world yet, maybe they’re possible, I’m not sure. I saw there were a few org mode plugins, but from what I saw they lacked agenda functionality.

                                                    Window management is probably the biggest difference for me though. Ace, Avy, Eyebrowse, and Evil-mode got me to give up tmux+vim as my preferred environment. I’ve found somewhat-similar plugins in VSCode but again, they still can’t touch their Emacs equivalents yet.

                                                  3. 2

                                                    This is half of the answer I give when people ask me why I religiously stick to plain text editors rather than full-blown domain-specific IDEs. Not only do plain text editors allow me to work in the same environment regardless of which OS I’m running; the other half of the answer is that they also allow me to work in the same environment regardless of what type of content I’m editing. Be it LaTeX, Org, F#, Common Lisp, HTML, JSON – I can edit it all with the same generic text-manipulation tools.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    It does have a name, it’s CVE-2019-5602.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      The author questions why CS is often part of the math department, as if math is not also a creative endeavor…

                                                      1. 1

                                                        The way it’s taught in a lot of places leaves that impression. It’s a reasonable question.

                                                      1. 10

                                                        My response to this copied from https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20258485

                                                        Thanks :) It’s 0.0.12, the first public release. What’s with all this “vaporware”?

                                                        The compiler can already compile itself in 0.3 seconds and is written 100% in V: https://github.com/vlang/v#installing-v-from-source

                                                        It allows building easy cross platform graphical apps: https://github.com/vlang/v/tree/master/examples/tetris

                                                        It has easy cross compilation and can even compile itself for another platform: https://twitter.com/v_language/status/1137537130887077890

                                                        It allows to build small performant GUI apps like Volt: https://volt-app.com/ (Volt 1.0 RC 1 for macOS has been used by thousands of happy users for several months.)

                                                        It powers a simple forum: https://blog.vlang.io/forum And the entire forum is one 65 KB binary.

                                                        It can translate and build DOOM: https://github.com/vlang/doom

                                                        It has very extensive and simple to read documentation that covers pretty much the entire language: https://vlang.io/docs

                                                        I think it’s pretty good for 0.0.12.

                                                        Come back when it’s v1.0 by the end of this year.

                                                        1. 9

                                                          Now that you have added WIP, I am satisfied. Now it is not misleading and people can decide for themselves.

                                                          Keep it like this and I won’t complain any more. Keep up the good work, you are doing something right.

                                                          1. 8

                                                            It can translate and build DOOM: https://github.com/vlang/doom

                                                            I only see one file there, can you please push the rest?

                                                            1. 2

                                                              It seems like people are kind of dogpiling on your project here, and perhaps the criticism is warranted. I haven’t looked that much into V, but I’m hoping this is a case of just over-hyping and trying to deliver something too early (although you’ve made it clear this is an alpha), and that you continue to work on this and make it something great.

                                                            1. 39

                                                              In C:

                                                              #define K * 1024
                                                              

                                                              DONE! Snorts cocaine.

                                                              1. 15
                                                                #define K <<10
                                                                

                                                                Shorter.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Not by much, and runs the risk of some not understanding.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I always find it weird that the precedence of << is lower than + in C. So 1 + 1 << 1 evaluates to 4 instead of 3 like I would expect.

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      If I recall correctly, << and >> were added to the language after there were already a dozen or so C programmers, and they didn’t want to force everybody to re-learn the precedence rules.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Reminds me of how the Makefile syntax was bugged, but by the time the author realized it, it was too late.

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          You mean that you always have to use a single tab? I actually like that.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            So many people like spaces. I like tabs.

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              Tabs for indentation, spaces for layout works fine for me. Then the tab width doesn’t matter anymore (because let’s face it: 1 tab = 8 spaces is ridiculous).

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                8-space tabs is the only way to write C.

                                                                    2. 1

                                                                      plus you get the benefit that the compiler will probably prevent you from applying it to a float or double.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        Under the circumstances, is that really a benefit?

                                                                      2. 0

                                                                        unsnorts cocaine

                                                                      3. 11

                                                                        This is also very easy to do generically in D:

                                                                        auto K(T)(T n) { return n * 1024;}

                                                                        D’s Uniform Function call Syntax and Compile-Time Function Execution allow you to use this elegantly and without any runtime overhead, without having to specify anything else:

                                                                        enum x = 512.K;

                                                                        enum y = 2048L.K; //(for long int type)

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        This is really neat, and nice online demo!

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          I lost it at the easter egg recipe… when it panics and just has you peel and slice the easter eggs multiple times.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            Nice! Avy is fantastic, it takes vim-like cursor movement to another level. I find it especially useful when when I’ve got multiple buffer windows open and want to jump between different parts of them.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Gun also supports websockets, something I’d like to explore more. It’s good to see an example of some of its features used in Elixir!

                                                                              1. 6

                                                                                Your comment made me realize I totally forgot to tag Elixir too! We mostly use Hackney right now (via Tesla) and we’ve generally been happy, but I’d be pretty excited to see a Gun adapter.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Testla is AWESOME and so is Hackney.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    I just happened to check recent activity in the Tesla repo and saw a Gun adapter PR was recently merged! Figured I’d update this thread for anyone else still actually paying attention :)