Threads for lilja

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    There’s an Adjust ClearType Text entry in the Start Menu that runs a wizard to tune how the anti-aliasing is configured. It asks you which options looks best. You can get pretty close to MacOS-like hinting.

    There’s no better, it comes down to taste. But this implementation is definitely worse, it eats CPU and makes your system unstable. Not worth the placebo.

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      I’ve been user of MacType for almost a decade and can’t say it’s ever caused any stability problems. Nor performance for that matter; for an example the battery life on my laptop is not affected at all whether it’s on or not. I recall two or three applications suffering from text rendering bugs due to MacType, but you can easily switch the rendering off for them.

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        I tried that, and the truth is, you really can’t. No matter what I do with the Adjust Clear Type wizard, I still see color fringing on text, especially on thin fonts. It’s infuriating.

        I agree that this implementation is unreasonably slow. But the one good thing that makes me want to keep using it is that it uses FreeType, which actually produces good output, and has reasonable knobs to tune.

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          It has grayscale options. Use the Windows Magnifier at 300% while running the wizard, so each color bar becomes a whole pixel. And disable the Magnifier’s weird smoothing.

          You can set the grayscale factor manually in the registry too https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/desktop/wpf/advanced/cleartype-registry-settings?view=netframeworkdesktop-4.8

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        I don’t recommend using it; it broke a great many apps for me and introduced significant instability the last time that I tried it. Just change the default fonts instead.

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          I couldn’t tell what it actually is from the description. My guess from the title is that it provides an alternative text rendering engine that uses an ATS-like rendering engine in place of the Windows one. This is not ‘better’, it’s a different tradeoff. Windows renders text by very slightly adjusting the positions of the lines to better line up with the pixel boundaries. This gives sharper glyphs but worse kerning. Apple Type Services places the lines exactly where the glyphs say they should go, which means that they rely more on sub-pixel AA and so they look more blurry. When Apple shipped iTunes and Safari for Windows, people complained text looked blurry. When people move from macOS to Windows, they often think that the kerning is ugly.

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            That’s not what kerning is, although ClearType does also worsen the kerning as well. The bigger issue is that the overt hinting distorts the glyphs themselves, making them at worst look completely different original underlying font.

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              I’m not sure of the technical details of how this works, but it is using FreeType to render text, and gives access to FreeType’s tuning knobs.

              My problem with ClearType is that it actually looks blurrier than FreeType’s rendering (e.g., on Linux). Especially thin fonts at small sizes, some uprights are completely composed of color blur. It’s maddening.

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            My top recommendation is the Apple A1243, i.e. the regular Apple keyboard from ca. 2007.

            I own two of them, one in daily use and the other as reserve when the current one eventually breaks. Been using these for about two years now and—while not perfect—it’s by far my favorite keyboard I’ve ever used or owned; the form factor, look, quietness are just lovely, but first and foremost the typing feel is excellent; the switches used in these have just the perfect feel for fast typing in my opinion. You can still get these used in good condition for reasonable prices. You can do a Registry remapping for the modifier keys on Windows to match a standard non-Mac keyboard, or just leave them as is if that’s your preference.

            I also have a Vortex RACE3 mechanical keyboard with MX Brown switches that I bought last year as an experiment, but honestly I haven’t been using it that much. It’s nice for the rare occasions when I play games or just need a better key rollover, but for daily use the ergonomics are quite poor and the noise is annoying. Wouldn’t recommend for regular use.

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              I agree. I have used an Apple keyboard like that at work for a couple of years now, and I’m very happy with it. The one drawback is that it gets dirty/grimy in that weird way only aluminum Apple keyboards do.

              I would buy one also for home, but I’m extremely limited for space there, so I have a CM QuickFire TK there, which has combined arrow keys and number pad in the most ingenious way in order to get both in a tenkeyless form factor.