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    I think this looks great.

    Someone on the orange site (which I really don’t know why I keep going to, habit I guess) was upset saying “they’re spread too thin”, which seems entirely wrong. It just means that Microsoft is investing heavily. That is only good. Heck, I’d consider a job if they’d set up an office in Santa Cruz :)

    But I do wish that they’d invest in GitHub Issues and code review. I don’t think anyone can say with a straight face that they like them. There has to be a better way, perhaps a V2 that runs alongside using the same database but allowing a V1 UI for the people that can’t let it go. Gerrit has a better code review system, I don’t know about GitLab. There are certainly examples that can be cribbed from.

    EDIT: I’d also like to see them expand the remit of their CLI project to try and rethink the Git terminal workflow. Again, as above, I don’t think many people like it. It’s grown organically and a new way of interacting with Git knowing what we know now could be huge.

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      I really like GitHub Issues. My company forced my team to switch to Jira a few months ago, and it’s miserable. I can’t believe that in 2020 there are still major commercial web-apps as shitty as Jira. They can’t even get their textareas to work right; half the time when I hit Submit I watch it mangle my markup.

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        I’ve used GitHub Issues for over 10 years and like it. Of the 10 or so issue tracking tools I’ve used, it’s my favorite.

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          Heck, I’d consider a job if they’d set up an office in Santa Cruz :)

          Besides the unusual circumstances of everyone working from home, GitHub is very remote-friendly. You should apply! (If you meant Microsoft, I can’t help there…)

          All I can say about the other things is stay tuned. These were some impactful releases today, but we’re not done yet.

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            I also like Github issues. I’ve used issue trackers for something like 18 years, literally every day at points, and I can’t think of one that’s clearly better than Github. I’ve been using it regularly for at least 4 years.

            Like all software, it can be improved more (e.g. latency), but I can find about 100 other pieces of software to complain about first.

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            I asked a similar question a few years back when I wanted to reboot my Emacs setup. Someone advised me to check out Spacemacs and I did. I’ve been using it for a few years now, and I like it. It’s a “distribution” of Emacs that comes with a number of packages (“layers”) that are easy to enable (and have documentation!) and a consistent nemonic for accessing functionality. As a Vim user you may be interested in the VI emulation mode, which is the Spacemacs default. I use it in Emacs mode, myself.

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              I’ve played with Spacemacs off and on and always have run into issues with input lag and with it being a leaky abstraction. I’m not surprised or too bothered by it being a leaky abstraction, since I can google (as a verb, not a proper noun) and I have decent knowledge of Emacs Lisp, but the stutters and random lag are very annoying (far worse than any Electron app I’ve used, including Atom, which isn’t wonderfully optimized). What do you do to get around that? I’m still using Neovim because it feels like a very sharp tool compared to any big Emacs configuration.

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              Ah, this brings back memories. When I was trying to get my sound driver working back then, I recompiled my kernel so many times that I dreamed of the text scrolling on the screen.

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                Same. I got good at recognizing the patterns and had a pretty good idea when it would fail. I called it “zen compiling”.

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                I used Linux every day for years on multiple machines for work, in the 90s with GUI etc. Didn’t have any of these problems.

                . ¯_(ツ)_/¯

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                  Having multiple machines might have been part of why your experience was good.

                  I remember triple-checking every config and then rebooting with fingers crossed. Because if my computer didn’t come back up, I didn’t have access to another one, so I couldn’t look up how to fix the problem…

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                    I only had 1 at a time.

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                    What distro were you using? On what hardware?

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                      There was a place we went in Chinatown that sold generic beige towers. I have no memory of what was in them except they were inexpensive.

                      I used a couple of distros. First Caldera, the RedHat. Used Slackware for a bit but RH was less fiddly to set up so I usually used it. Added bonus w RedHat was that it was our “production distro” in the later years.

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                        Caldera was the one that cost me two gigs. Worked nicely on friends’ machine, though. And it was $20 vs $100+ for Windows. I could at least see the potential.

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                          How’d it cost you two gigs?

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                            https://lobste.rs/s/oqitcz/my_experience_with_linux_90s_why_i_have#c_ut793d

                            EDIT: It was a good way to learn I better really understand shit myself, esp recovering it, before putting it on my machine. :)

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                    Ah, thank you for posting this!

                    Learning Magit has been the best workflow improvement I’ve made in the past year. I’m happy to back Jonas’s campaign.

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                      I wonder if there’s a way to “shoehorn” lazy evaluation into Ruby while both simplifying the interface and honoring its existing idioms. I like Ruby for a lot of reasons, but modularity and functional programming isn’t one of them aren’t two of them.

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                          I have half of another post drafted about all the problems I ran into when trying to implement this in Ruby. The tl;dr version is that internal and external iterator methods don’t play well together!

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                          I subscribe to Pinboard’s archiving feature in order to get this. I don’t use it often, but when I need it, it’s worth it. Sometimes the content has simply moved, but other times the site is offline (guess I need an archive of Pinboard’s archive though…).

                          This statistic quoted in the article is worrying:

                          A 2014 Harvard Law School study by Jonathan Zittrain, Kendra Albert and Lawrence Lessig, determined that approximately 50% of the URLs in U.S. Supreme Court opinions no longer link to the original information.

                          It will be very difficult for future courts to track down these references (unlike those in books).

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                            Can Pinboard deep-archive a site?

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                              No, it only saves the page you bookmark. It does download assets, though, so you can look at it later more-or-less how it looked at the time.

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                                FWIW with the new headless mode Chrome can save a PDF from the command line quite easily. To me, a PDF has always seemed superior to trying to save all the assets and such, particularly in this age of heavy client-side “apps”.

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                              I don’t think anything can teach you the value of operability (stuff like good logs, metrics, dashboards, exception tracking…) better than being on call. When something is going wrong, you need insight into what is happening in the system.

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                                Author here. Let me know if you have comments or feedback on the article. It was fun to write.

                                (P.S.: Glad to finally join Lobsters. I’ve been reading it for a long time.)