Threads for lthms

  1. 2

    Am I alone in thinking the index should always be there in these simplified Gits?

    The use flow would have only one more step, equivalent to git add -p more or less. Maybe even as a mandatory part of commit so no extra things to remember.

    I hated using the undo buffer for staging in the SVN days.

    1. 2

      That’s analogous to what darcs for instance does. When you call darcs record, it basically does something similar to git add -p && git commit.

      pijul used to work like that too. In the most recent version, I think the diff is there to be edited in the editor, so basically, you can remove chunk from your patch by removing them from within the editor. With the appropriate editor tooling, I guess it can be quiet pleasant. Without it, I always feared —though never tried— it could be painlul.

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      For quite some time now, I’ve been very curious to VCS in general, and since I’ve worked daily with git, tools to make my life easy with git. That’s why I’ve been drawn to stacked git and am curious to explore more git branchless

      I didn’t know gitless. Considering there were a submission 6 years ago, and that the latest release is not that old (2019), it looks like it has found a public? I am not sure to fully understand the “ Independent branches” bit, but the rest of the claim looks interesting. Not sure if it scales to advanced usage of git, but more often than not you don’t need to get advanced, so definitely interesting to explore simpler interfaces.

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          I am a bit reassured that I am not the only one thinking that the numerous claims of “blazingly fast” Rust lib/apps can be a bit annoying. ^^

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            93°C on all cores is certainly blazing.

            1. 2

              They might run fast, but compiling is painfully slow. My 2017 (I think) dual core XPS takes ages to compile anything with GUI elements or even moderately complicated. On my desktop machine (5900X) it’s bearable.

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              Screen sharing has proven to be a bit more difficult than expected on Wayland-based setup.

              In addition to the setup described in this blogpost, I had to make the following modification:

              1. Thanks to systemctl --user status xdg-desktop-portal-wlr.service, I discovered slurp was a necessary dependency.
              2. I had to add export MOZ_ENABLE_WAYLAND=1 and export XDG_CURRENT_DESKTOP=sway to my .zshrc file
              3. The /etc/pipewire/media-session.d/media-session.conf file was outdated. Using pacdiff, I was able to replace it by its pacnew counterpart. The key difference between the two files is the metadata module. The following lines has to be uncommented.
              { name = libpipewire-module-metadata }
              

              And after all that, it finally worked on Firefox.

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                I am intended to work on a PR for stgit that I have initiated to be able to use it as part of my dayjob workflow.

                I really love the tool.

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                  How is this related to GNU.org? It’s hard to tell from the front-page and introductory blog-post whether this is a break-off organisation, or something else entirely.

                  This sent me off searching as to whether GNU is actually trademarked in any way, but apparently it’s not? Perhaps not surprising, given Richard Stallman’s stance on intellectual property in general, but it’s interesting to see how “ownership” of a name can be very contentious – do people who toil under a name have cause to co-opt it?

                  1. 5

                    but it’s interesting to see how “ownership” of a name can be very contentious – do people who toil under a name have cause to co-opt it?

                    Ironically, a thread was circulating on Twitter the other day in which a former executive director of GNOME pointed out that GNOME is not a GNU project and they’ve asked the FSF to stop listing it as one – without success.

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                      Who would have thought that calling your project the GNU Network Object Model Environment would make people associate you with GNU.

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                        GNOME has not been an acronym for at least a decade.

                        As far as I understood it from only sort of paying attention at the time, the split away from GNU happened for a lot of reasons, not least of which was Stallman’s loud public denunciations of GNOME’s leadership, and a Stallman-endorsed attempt to impose a code of ideological censorship on the GNOME project’s blog aggregator.

                        1. 5

                          The GNU project has a habit of refusing to let go projects when their maintainer wish it. I think I remember a similar issue with Libreboot. They of course live open the door for forking the project, but they basically say that if this happen, they will search for a new maintainer on their hand.

                          1. 1

                            The GNU project has a habit of refusing to let go projects when their maintainer wish it. I think I remember a similar issue with Libreboot.

                            I wouldn’t touch the toxic tarpit around that project with a ten mile pole, when the best defence you can come up with is “we were on drugs lol” [0] you know you’re in a special place. And the drama continues [1].

                            And people wonder why I want anonymity and privacy online.

                            [0] https://libreboot.org/news/unity.html

                            [1] https://libreboot.org/news/resignations.html

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                              I was not aware of that, tbh. Though, regarding the GNOME project, it looks like the same pattern arise (modulo the drama).

                              1. 3

                                I was not aware of that, tbh. Though, regarding the GNOME project, it looks like the same pattern arise (modulo the drama).

                                The people around gnome are smarter and present themselves as a lot more photogenic, but if you want to see how hostile they are try and get a patch accepted in gnome. You will be drowned in bureaucratic red tape. In GNU land you might want to tear your hair out over terrible decisions, like not exporting the parse tree from GCC, but at least you feel like someone is listening to you.

                      2. 2

                        This is a “fork” of GNU, by people here.

                        1. 3

                          What are they referring to when they say “GNU Project”? The real thing or their fork? Nevermind, they updated the page since I open it the first time.

                          This post probably explains it better. Seems like a kind of union of GNU project maintainers, not a seperate project in itself, as they are still linking to gnu.org and not hosting their own code and project tools.

                          Edit: Here some more info: https://lists.gnu.tools/hyperkitty/list/assembly@lists.gnu.tools/message/RASDB353K5ONC654JDXBQCE7PFADYBSX/

                          1. 2

                            It was my understanding too: it’s not a fork, it’s mostly a group of maintainers aiming to coordinate their efforts within the wider umbrella of the GNU project (I guess they also hope to be able to steer the project in a direction more aligned with their values this way).

                            It sounds like a sane thing to do, but I fear like it won’t be welcomed well on the other hand of GNU.

                        2. 1

                          From r/freesoftware,

                          This is merely a resurgence of the “gnu-tools” initiative by the usual suspects.

                          Ostensibly it was an initiative to introduce more influence on the whole GNU project by maintainers (maintainers already have full control over their own GNU projects apart from redefining software freedom, which is where RMS has final say).

                          When asked the hard questions, it quickly became clear that this self-appointed shadow government was really about ousting RMS from the GNU project with hardly a though about how to continue after that.

                          Anyway, if you have several days, you can inform yourself. It’s all on display in the gnu-misc mailing list (from 2019-11 and onwards. Search for “social contract”)

                          In the end, most GNU maintainers weren’t on board and the discussion died down.

                        1. 5

                          This is fairly similar to the workflow that Stacked Git encourages, which I’ve used every day for the last several years. It’s really helped me in having focused commits, because I’ve already stated up front what will be in each individual patch.

                          You can create a new commit (at “patch” in Stacked Git terminology) by providing a name, and then filling out the commit message all the way here at the beginning.

                          $ stg new -- patch-name
                          

                          Then you can work on your changes like normal, and when you’ve got them, you can add to the staging area and then add the staging area to the patch at the top of the stack.

                          $ git add -p
                          $ stg refresh -i
                          

                          If you want to make a change not describe by your current patch, you can make a new one, and then use command to manipulate the stack.

                          $ stg pop
                          $ stg push
                          $ stg goto patch-name
                          

                          With a few project-specific exceptions, I only work off of the main branch, using the stack as the exclusive means of working on changes. To interact with systems expecting branches (like GitHub and Bitbucket) I manipulate the stack to reflect the desired branch (often, just a single patch) and use an alias that pushes the top patch by ID to a branch named after the top patch.

                          $ git push -f origin $(stg id):refs/heads/patches/$(stg top)
                          

                          Once changes are merged upstream, I can rebase patches on top and remove ones already merged.

                          $ stg pull -m
                          $ stg clean
                          

                          I haven’t done any scientific testing, but I feel I’m more productive with this system than I ever was trying tease commits apart and squashed together with git commands manually.

                          1. 1

                            I wanted to try Stacked Git for a while now, and installed it yesterday. I think I will give it a real try, as your comment really resonates with the workflow I have in mind. Thanks!

                            Is there a way to easily reorder patches in a stack? I see stg float and stg sink exist.

                            1. 1

                              AFAIK, there’s no interface for reorganizing the patches in a series like you might do in your editor with an interactive rebase. I’m very rarely working with a series large enough that working with stg push, stg pop and stg sink feels too limiting. If you are, I’m curious to learn more, and what solutions (if any) you come up with.

                          1. 1

                            I haven’t written a line of PureScript in 2 or 3 years I think, and I am glad this language is still moving forward!

                            1. 2

                              That was a really interesting, and insightful read. I use Emacs daily, but I never thought of it as analogous to bash and sort. The article provides a compelling argument that, in fact, it is. Thanks for sharing!

                              1. 3

                                After 6 years, I’ve left my now former employer and will start a new job on January 4th. During the next two weeks, I plan to clean-up my dotfiles to be as productive as possible. Right now, I have decided to heavily rework my Emacs configuration, to make it more consistent and predictable. I have already made some progress, in particular wrt. startup time (from almost 4s to 1s). I still have some work to do though.

                                And, of course, there is Christmas.

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                                  I have a friend who was at a job for 6 years and left to start a new job on 1/4 who is ALSO a fan of Emacs… I’m suddenly suspicious.

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                                    Does your friend happen to live in France? :p

                                    1. 1

                                      He does not. That’s a pretty good separator between you two. Haha

                                  2. 1

                                    Nice! Exciting to get out of your comfort zone! I wish you luck, health and progress to your new job! As my favorite poet wrote I hope your road is a long one, full of adventure, full of discovery :-)

                                  1. 4

                                    I am finally releasing a first (beta) version of coqffi, a tool for Coq I have been working on for quite some time now; and I need to write a tutorial prior to do a call of betatesters.

                                    1. 2

                                      Personally, I have been using BÉPO for 4 or 5 years now, and I have decided to use this opportunity to remap hjkl in vim to jkl: (as they are printed in qwerty layout, wich translates to tsrn in bépo). This right shift allows me not to move my end to move the cursor. I am pretty happy about this.

                                      1. 1

                                        I’ve seen a few people mention that they made this change, and while it does initially seem like hjkl is misaligned by one key, I believe there is a reason for that. Down and up are pressed far more often, especially down, so they’re positioned under the two strongest fingers. Left and right, are less common because you can move by word, or using f,F,t,T.

                                        Not trying to criticise your change, I just thought that might be interesting for people to know.

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                                        Thanks for the in-depth explanations on what was going on @pmeunier, I can understand why it took you several days to write!

                                        1. 30

                                          Therefore, if after reading this post, you independently rediscover the algorithms presented here, that’s ok, but you must still license your “independent rediscovery” under the Gnu GPL-2.0 license, and cite the sources (for instance this post).

                                          This sounds legally void to me. GPL covers code, not algorithms. Algorithms aren’t copyrightable anywhere, and patentable only in some countries.

                                          1. 4

                                            It was even stranger this morning.

                                            Warning about licenses

                                            This blog post contains documentation about Pijul. Pijul is licensed under the Gnu GPL-2.0 or any later version at your convenience.

                                            Therefore, if after reading this post, you independently rediscover the algorithms presented here, that’s ok, but you must still license your “independent rediscovery” under the Gnu GPL-2.0 license, and cite the sources (for instance this post). This also applies if that rediscovery happens in the future, including in zero, one or more years.

                                            1. 3

                                              Seems this has been removed?

                                              1. 1

                                                That depends on the meaning of derived works. The algorithm is not described there independently of the code, it’s hosted on the same website, as documentation of the code.

                                                But nobody forces you to read that post.

                                                1. 10

                                                  The GPL is only about code as @dmbaturin said. The blogpost itself is on GFDL which do not prevent me from reading article and implementing the same algorithms. AFAIK this wouldn’t be considered as a derivative work in any jurisdiction that I am aware of. So for me it also sounds void.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    I would personally tend to agree with @dmbaturin on this one, although I am far from being a legal expert and in any circumstances, the final world would be to the potential court that would review the case.

                                                    Licensing is hard @_@

                                                  2. 1

                                                    While I agree with you as far as us law goes, are we really sure that the same is true about every countries copyright law?

                                                    I think I’ll just stay away from this one.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      There’s a dispute in the European legal sciences about the copyrightability of algorithms, but indeed, most people here agree that algorithms are not copyrightable. Those who do not, usually also think that code and algorithm is the same. For those without any background in IT, this difference is difficult to grasp.

                                                      (I studied Law in Germany)

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                                                      Awesome initiative; feel free to share your thoughts on the latest iteration of my website.

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                                                        The font choice gives me LaTeX vibes. Very clean.

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                                                          I like it VERY much. I like how the code is colored, how smooth it is, like the concept of “News” section.

                                                          If it were up to me I would maybe just remove, or improve, the “Revisions” expandable - it doesn’t seem to contain anything useful for the reader. Also the bit where you introduce yourself is posted at the end of everything. I would probably move it to a separate section or leave it in home only.

                                                          And maybe, since Projects is currently empty, it should not be displayed.

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                                                            Reviewed on iPhone X

                                                            • the items in the nav bar are squished together for me
                                                            • some of the article summaries on the home page could use more vertical margin.
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                                                              Woww, your site is really great!!

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                                                              My site is at https://bernsteinbear.com. I get very polarized responses :)

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                                                                I think your site’s chill and classic!

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                                                                  Thanks ^_^

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                                                                  I love this! Its theme is very similar to the Oil shell site. Super clean.

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                                                                    There’s a little comment in the CSS that says that the navbar was heavily “inspired” by oilshell :)

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                                                                    Linux/Desktop (1920x1080, 16:9)/Chromium with uBlock

                                                                    I really like this one. After reading a few of the “Compiling a Lisp” articles, I also copied a few design cues to my personal site. I’m sorry I cannot say more, it’s just easy to read and easy to navigate. If I had to try to say something it would be that the entire site is a bit too narrow, and that it might be better to use more semantic HTML5 tags instead of custom div classes?

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                                                                      Is your current website the one everyone is complaining about? I think it’s great.

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                                                                        Everybody is exaggerated, it was just one comment that caught my attention. But other than that, I don’t think it’s to surprising considering it’s inspiration ^^.

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                                                                        Hm, interesting. Do you have any reading on this that you recommend? My HTML knowledge is at least 10, if not more, years out of date.

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                                                                          I’m not expert either, I just check if I can use a semantic tag, when applicable. AFAIK the main advantage is that web readers /scrapers can properly parse what’s the site and what’s is just the header/footer (if you enable lobste.rs “article preview” feature, you’ll notice the difference).

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                                                                            Oh, neat – thank you. I have some open graph data and some other metadata, but this might help.

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                                                                        Your site has no bells or whistles. It is a site. It has text. The text is the main focus. There is no fluff. It loads instantly. It is glorious.

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                                                                          Glad you like it :)

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                                                                          I like the nav bar, the contrast, and the no-frills aesthetic, and the style choice of serif font works.

                                                                          Despite broadly agreeing with high-contrast text, I think the background could be a touch lighter (maybe just going from lobste.rs to your site is hard, especially since I’m in a light environment right now).

                                                                          Mostly, though, some breathing room would really help, especially with the bullet points; the line spacing between one single-line bullet point to the next is identical to the line-spacing between lines in a single multi-line bullet point. Everything just blurs together and only a small dot on the side helps me distinguish between bullets.

                                                                          Increasing the font size could also be a big help for people with impaired vision.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            I added some list item spacing. Thanks for the tip off.

                                                                            I also reduced the text contrast a little bit with some not-quite-black and not-quite-white.

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                                                                              Nice one. The bullet points are a lot easier to read now.

                                                                              The lightening of the background does help, too, but I’m also in a dark environment now (albeit with the same bright screen).

                                                                              I wasn’t even saying about darkening the text, but the muting there does help as well. I think overall you’ve struck a good balance between high contrast (light clashing with dark) and low contrast (words blending into the background).

                                                                          2. 2

                                                                            I love it! Looks great on both my desktop and phone, and it isn’t weighed down by big images or fonts.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Oh, that is good to hear. I do not regularly check up on how it looks on a phone, despite half my visitors using phones.

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                                                                              For me it’s missing only one thing, which is to support dark mode via a CSS media query. I’d love to see just how brief a dark mode implementation can be, and your site is the perfect test subject.

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                                                                                I brought back dark mode, new and improved. Can you let me know what you think?

                                                                                Re: brevity: the longest part is the syntax highlighting.

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                                                                                  Functionally it looks nice and readable, and should be pleasant in a dark room. Warm fireplace colors were a good choice for syntax.

                                                                                  You could stop there; it’s a nice upgrade! If you want more critique:

                                                                                  If any of the colors are off, it’s the links in dark mode. In light mode visited links stand out a little less than unvisited, which is desirable. In dark mode, the unvisited links are diminished against black and the visited stand out. I might try brightening the blue and dimming the purple a bit.

                                                                                  Finally, check the link colors on the same dark screen as the syntax colors. The syntax colors give a cozy character to the site, but the link colors establish a different kind of environment, such that when you first reach a syntax block, the warmth is a surprise. I think the link colors would need more saturation to fit in.

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                                                                                    Thanks for the in depth reply! When I next find the energy to CSS I’ll take a look.

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                                                                                  Someone made one but there was something slightly wrong about pre tags in headers that weren’t legible (?), so I reverted it. It was pretty simple so if you’re interested you’re welcome to revive that patch.

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                                                                                  Academic style - I like it. Loads in 106ms from Frankfurt which is pretty nice :)

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                                                                                    Grüße aus den Staaten!

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                                                                                      I don’t really live in Germany (or understand german for that matter), but when I run https://tools.pingdom.com/ , I use Frankfurt since it has the best ping to Norway :)

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                                                                                        Oh, lol. That’s “greetings from the US”

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                                                                                          Greetings from Norway :D Or rather; Beste hilsener fra Norge :)

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                                                                                    Nothing wrong with your site. It is a perfect example of what the web was originally created for: Sharing information.

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                                                                                      I really like it. Text-heavy instead of the modern white peace overload with big images that everything leans towards now.

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                                                                                        Kinda like your website, eh? And you are a cyclist too! :D

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                                                                                        Clean, elegant styling, simple design, focus on the content (text). Clear links to different parts and an rss feed. Couldn’t make me happier.

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                                                                                          Glad you enjoy!

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                                                                                          The way you separated the series on the /blog is something I want to steal.

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                                                                                            Oh man the implementation is such a hack. If you use Jekyll, please don’t look! :P

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                                                                                              I am in Python land, so I could not get it even if I looked. :)

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                                                                                                What do you use to generate your blog? I am considering moving off Jekyll.

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                                                                                                  I use Lektor. It is based on python, so slower to generate the pages locally, but my reasons are listed in this post - why I chose Lektor. See the Why Lektor section.

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                                                                                              The bulleted list under “I like making things” is a little crowded, but otherwise, I love it!

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                                                                                                And to think I just removed some things :P Do you mean the length? Or the density of links? Or…?

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                                                                                                  I should have mentioned that I’m on mobile. The density of the links is part of it. I think inserting an empty line between list entries would make a world of difference. You could take it further by increasing font size and line spacing. The bullets also make it look like the text is being physically squished into the right side of the screen so it may help to replace them with faux bullets (e.g. asterisks)?

                                                                                                  I don’t know, this feels like such a small point, and it’s all about highly personal preferences. Your site is great!

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                                                                                                I really like this one; it’s clean and simple, and it works great with me.

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                                                                                                  Glad you like it!

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                                                                                                This was a very pleasant read, with a clear picture of the path taken by the author, and the problem they solve; thanks for sharing!

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                                                                                                  The rationale motivating this hack is good; I wonder if tree couldn’t be “fixed” upstream, though.

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                                                                                                    I am writing the reference manual for a small software I have been working on for the past two weeks, so that I can then start talking a bit more about said small software.