Threads for majkinetor

  1. 2

    On Windows we don’t need better GUI automation tools. We have bunch of awesome ones. Personally I prefer AutoHotKey.

    Here, its not only GUI, but browser automation combined with GUI automation which is more problematic since browsers do not use system GUIs.

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      The article is about GUI-based automation tools, not tools for automating GUI interactions. So AHK doesn’t count here.

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      I’m going to play a game of Eldritch Horror. Looking forward to it, as it’s supposed to be a streamlined version of Arkham Horror (which I love, for all its flaws).

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        Its not bad. I recommend Mansions of Madness

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          I concur. Me and my group do see it as the streamlined version of Arkham Horror. We’ve never won (out of many 5 games) but it’s fun every time.

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            I’ve lost too often to remember. In the end I had to give it away. Good game though. :)

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          Self-promotion for fundraising, flagged. Cool project though!

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            Why is this any different then people self promoting their blog articles (which they do all the time here). In 99% of cases It ultimateivelly is about end effect, which is money.

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              I highly dispute the 99% numbers. How do you even get this idea? There are so many blogs that don’t have ads, are not trying to promote their authors, etc.pp.

              1. 1

                Self promotion, not ads - its about better prospects on future jobs by building and influencing community around the stuff you do.

                So 99% is from head, but I am sure its even higher. Or you tell me you know bunch of people, who write great technical blogs just for the sake of researching particular topic, are stuffed for life (rich family) or despise materialism and live in a barrel like 1 dude ever, and do it anonymously because they dont need any attention …

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                  Or you tell me you know bunch of people, who write great technical blogs just for the sake of researching particular topic, are stuffed for life (rich family) or despise materialism and live in a barrel like 1 dude ever, and do it anonymously because they dont need any attention …

                  This seems to be an overly cynical perspective. I write blog posts because I want to share my knowledge or some other information with the world, and I’m sure I’m not alone.

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              Thanks!

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                Something on the tagging: note that tags on lobsters are block-if-any.

                So, if you have a diehard emacs user that is filtering vim, they won’t see this, nor will a vim user filtering emacs, or anybody filtering web (which is usually kind of a broad tag). So, a smaller supporting set of tags is usually going to help you.

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                  That actually defeats the purpose of tags and looks more like categories.

                  The said problem is internal software thing.

                  In any case, about that dude filtering out emacs - I could totally live with that :)

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                    Thanks, didn’t know that!

              1. 3

                Very nice project, I admire it is done in common lisp too although that will probably prevent some devs jumping in.

                History tree is something new for me in the browser world (only had that in vim so far) and is awesome feature. Other things are not really new as Vimium plugin does many cool things. Other interesting thing, jumping to headers fuzzy way is also new for me, but I wonder its practicallity.

                I suggest adding another great vim/Vimium feature - marking position on page (m) and jumping to it latter (`). Its fantastic way to navigate over big tehcnical documents.

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                  This is a good suggestion, I’ll note it down! :)

                  1. 2

                    With capital letter marks for bookmarks! I imagine the power….

                    1. 1

                      See what I wrote down: https://github.com/atlas-engineer/next/issues/392:

                      we could even name the marks, persist them, fuzzy-search them, etc.

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                    I think that netsurf also has a history tree.

                  1. 2

                    I use A LOT of tools, majority of which daily or every few days. I am mostly on Windows 10 today for all needs.

                    Those are almost always cross platform FOSS tools:

                    • Firefox, Double Commander, VsCode, Vim, fzf, CopyQ, SmPlayer, VLC, Calibre, Tixati, Powershell, Thunderbird, git, less, Rundeck, DBeaver, Invoke-Build, pandoc, Signal

                    OS specific (I tend to avoid OS lock-in except when tools are epic):

                    • Windows: ConEmu, Everything, Sysinternals, AutoHotkey, TortoiseGit, Chocolatey, DnGrep, SoulSeek
                    • Linux: i3, ranger, locate

                    Online services:

                    • Diigo, Gist List, Github, LastPass, SoundCloud

                    Browser plugins:

                    • Vimium, DarkReader, uBlock Origin, ViolentMonkey
                    1. 8

                      Nowadays I use code files for configuration pretty much all the time because:

                      • the team doesn’t have to learn an additional configuration language since it’s the same language than the rest of the project
                      • it’s powerful, nothing prevents you to use some environment variables for example
                      • comments, documentation and variables work as expected
                      • sane programmers will never put crazy amounts of complexity and business logic in configuration files even if you don’t force them to use a dumbed-down configuration language
                      1. 2

                        This.

                        I find Powershell hashtables great for configuration.

                      1. 4

                        Very awesome and above all honest article. Love the part about working at a beach 😊

                        1. 7

                          I hope they get the UX right, git sure failed on that.

                          But for simple, sane version control [0] fossil pretty much solves that problem. It doesn’t use Git, or use Unveil/Pledge, but it’s pretty safe and sane and is BSD(2-clause) licensed. It can import/export to Git, so one can interact with the git world if one chooses.

                          0: https://www.fossil-scm.org

                          Regardless, it will be interesting to see what comes of this, and what it means for longer-term OpenBSD sources.. will they move off of CVS someday?

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                            (Game of Trees author here)

                            I haved used Fossil for some projects, mostly OpenBSD driver projects. Fossil is good for small projects and I have successfully used it to overlay local versioning for selected files on top of a CVS checkout, which not many VCS will do as painlessly as Fossil does. It is also the only well-known version control system I’m aware of with a licence that would be accepted into OpenBSD base (BSD-like, ISC preferred).

                            But when I attempted a full conversion a few years ago, Fossil simply did not scale to the size of OpenBSD’s source tree. I did try to convert the OpenBSD repo from CVS via git to fossil (which was the officially recommended way of migrating from CVS to Fossil at the time, which is probably still the case today). I aborted Fossil’s import of git’s fast-export stream after several days(!) at which point it was done with history between 1995 and 2000, with at least 10 more years of history to go through. This was the performance I saw after I had already hacked Fossil to batch multiple commits into a single sqlite transaction, instead of using one sqlite transaction per commit (sqlite is not optimized to run many transactions per second, see https://sqlite.org/faq.html#q19).

                            Fossil has its own particular design goals for its own particular niche (sqlite development with issue tracking and wiki tooling built-in).

                            Got is meant for another niche (OpenBSD developers) and as such it is not meant to be a drop-in replacement for Git. At present it just provides a small but convenient subset of what Git can do on a local repo. It already serves my own OpenBSD development needs better than Fossil ever did.

                            1. 3

                              Thanks for the reply!

                              It’s great that you tried Fossil. I haven’t ever tried it on a large repo. Sad that it couldn’t handle it very well. Days to import is definitely a bad sign for what every day use might be like. SQLite has ~ 20 years of history in it now, so I would guess it’s more just the size of the OpenBSD repo that’s the issue here, not really the history. OpenBSD despite being small in size for an OS, is way larger than SQLite.

                              I wish you luck on the project! I might give it a try as a better way to interact with Git.

                              1. 1

                                NetBSD has been doing conversion from CVS to Fossil since 2011, and it supposedly only took under 5 hours in 2011 to convert NetBSD CVS to Fossil, so, it’s not exactly clear why OpenBSD couldn’t be converted in several days.

                                In fact, NetBSD repository is known for having pretty crazy branching allowances, both for release engineering and for lots of user-initiated feature-branches, which are prohibited in OpenBSD, so, if anything, I’d expect the NetBSD repository to be far more complex and nuanced than OpenBSD as far as conversion needs are concerned.


                                https://2011.eurobsdcon.org/papers/sonnenberger/fossilizing.pdf
                                § 4.6 Performance

                                The run time for the conversion process on an Opteron 1389 (Quad-core, 3 GHz) with a RAID-1 of two 7200rpm SATA disks with 4GB memory is as following:

                                • CVS import — 34min
                                • Vendor branches — 4min
                                • Branch creation time — 24s
                                • Fossil import — 3h 56min

                                http://wiki.netbsd.org/mailing-lists/tech-repository/

                                We have a successful conversion from cvs to fossil since ~mid 2011, mostly thanks to the work of Jörg Sonnenberger.

                              2. 6

                                It looks like a more CVS-ified Git, which I think allows the CVS metaphors (which may be more user-friendly depending on your experience) to coexist with a real Git repository. I’m liking what I’m seeing on the man page: https://gameoftrees.org/got.1.html

                                1. 2

                                  ooh, I missed the man page. I agree, looks pretty nice.

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                                    The got man page seems to be missing an easy way to apply a diff was created with got diff and send to the mailing list. At least I didn’t see anything in the example section about it.

                                    Maybe they plan to defer to git am for that?
                                    Everything implies this is still a work-in-progress, so maybe it just hasn’t be done yet.

                                  2. 2

                                    I hope they get the UX right, git sure failed on that.

                                    What major gripes do you have with git’s UX?

                                    1. 6

                                      One could argue: is there any UX? :P

                                      But really you generally need to understand all the inner workings of git to successfully use the git command line. Tools should make your life easier. git generally makes your life harder, until you expend the time and energy to really understand all of git. svn, hg, fossil, etc all generally make your life easier. Git was created to make Linus’s life easier, which I’m sure it does very well, but basically nobody has his level of problems when it comes to VCS. Most people would be better served with something semi-idiot proof like mercurial, fossil or svn.

                                      There are tons of blogs and pages around that spam endlessly around the horribleness of git’s user experience. This is but one[0]:

                                      0: https://stevebennett.me/2012/02/24/10-things-i-hate-about-git/

                                      Also I’ll just add, when basically every developer conference has talks about how to survive with git in your life, and these talks have been going on for years, with no end in sight, I think it’s fair to say, git has failed UX.

                                    2. 1

                                      git sure failed on that

                                      Of course it failed there as Linus created Git with bare minimum tooling and hoped that there will be other UI implemented by community. Instead it organically grew to what it is today and bazaar style development isn’t the best for UX. There were projects like Easy Git but these are long gone.

                                      1. 3

                                        I agree with your history. LOL on bazaar style being terrible on UX(I agree). Even Microsoft has failed at UX sometimes. One could argue that UX hasn’t really changed very much since Xerox PARC days. when the mouse and the “desktop metaphor” was created.

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                                          UX on mobile is arguably new.

                                        2. 1

                                          TortoiseGit on Windows (and other Tortoise stuff for other repositories) is pretty cool.

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                                        Why is this tagged with python?

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                                          I tagged it with python because we ship a PyQt platform port in this new release. You could have fun sending commands to the browser with Python (we have a simple testclient.py that shows some commands). You can create new buffers (tabs) and windows, ask for page information, or send some JS and get the result.

                                          1. 2

                                            Thats very nice. Its not easy to do this on “regular” browser, especially as it doesn’t have normal UI as other programs and hence can’t be easily automated with tools such as xdotool or AutoHotkey.

                                            Makes exploits easier tho… there should be an option to prevent this somehow that isn’t changable by automation. Otherwise, what is stopping me to get fantastic info about your doings on the web in the background, constantly. Now you would have to constantly screenshot for this which is pretty visible. AFAIK, even web drivers do not allow for connecting to running instances that they didn’t start.

                                        1. 1

                                          What is the benefit over Vimium plugin (and friends?)

                                          Using different rendering engines is not exactly feature I can’t live with, especially as I can easily install all relevant browsers.

                                          1. 8

                                            Ah, there are many, thanks for asking :)

                                            • we wanted to support different rendering engines for users to choose a more secure one (the Blink renderer). Not relying on a single one also makes Next future-proof. Vimperator, Conkeror and friends all died because they were tied to a particular platform.
                                            • Next supports different key schemes: Emacs, Vim, specific ones.
                                            • you can tweak Next/develop extensions has it runs. Tweaking Vimium and all is cumbersome, and limited.
                                            • you are not limited by a browser’s api. You can develop a feature that calls an external program and writes the filesystem easily.
                                            • with Next you can do more than with Vimium and friends.
                                            1. 1

                                              OK, thx for the info.

                                              Why is there no Windows binary ? I could create chocolatey package if you make one.

                                              1. 2

                                                None of us use Windows, and we were busy finishing up the Blink port and must-have features for 1.3. Yet, we provide an experimental cross-platform pyinstaller archive: https://github.com/atlas-engineer/next/issues/275 We would like very much feedback on it specially on Windows ! I am unsure how to setup D-Bus for Windows though. Thanks for any hints.

                                                1. 1

                                                  There is no such thing as D-Bus for windows. Windows has different IPC/RPC mechanisms.

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                                                    I read that though:

                                                    The Windows port is knowing to work on Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7

                                                    https://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/dbus/

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                                                      I wouldn’t be very optimistic. Those systems are all dead for a very long time.

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                                                        damn :S thank you.

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                                            Looks cool but I’m too risk adverse to invest in something like this.

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                                              Risk adverse?

                                              1. 2

                                                This project could die at any moment. I try to avoid filling my head with stuff I won’t use in the future.

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                                                    I more meant “what about this is so risky you shan’t use it?”, it didn’t occur to me that verbal cues are lost through text like that, I’m tired.

                                                2. 0

                                                  I can understand, but note that IMO using Vimium, Tridactyl and friends is more risky. Similar projects that were tied to a single platform all died in the past (Vimperator, Conkeror,…). Next’s core is an independent Lisp program (and Lisp is, by the way, known for its stability).

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                                                    I’m not sure that’s fair. Qutebrowser has a nice list of similar projects - http://qutebrowser.org/#_inactive - and you can see that the graveyard is equally littered with “independent programs” and browser extensions : )

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                                                      Vimium exists for a very long time and is very unlikely to die. Port also exists on Firefox. I use both ATM and didn’t have any problems whatsoever.

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                                                        I don’t use those either. I tried Qutebrowser briefly but, again, too high risk. Browsers at this point are a closed platform

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                                                      I’ve used PowerGREP for twelve years and absolutely love it: https://powergrep.com (US $159).

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                                                        Looks great but I dont really want to support non FOSS tools. I want to be able to use it in any context and with everybody. Thinking about licenses for dev stuff is total breaker for me.

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                                                        How would this compare to something like BareGrep? Other then the everything integration.

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                                                          Its vastly inferior.

                                                          This one supports searching Word, PDF and archives which is great as you commonly have all in code repositories. Searches using XPath and phonetics also, and supports multiline. Colors output etc.

                                                          There are bunch of bare grep tools, which don’t add anything more on CLI version (they are basically CLI frontends).

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                                                          Another alternative is grepWin.

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                                                            Its vastly inferior.

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                                                              I can’t propose enough Reveal-md. Like you, I searched for years for a good tool for my random presentations.

                                                              Reveal.js looks amazing, people ALWAYS ask me in what tool I do presentations. With markdown as editing language you can really create slides very fast and yet have all expressibility of HTML if needed. You can also give to people plain markdown code of the presentation so they can open it in an editor of their choice, like vscode.

                                                              For PDF export I have custom shell script that runs all via pandoc to export it. But I prefer to give people HTML export so that it is exactly the same as I present it. This doesn’t require server to start, just load index.html and follow along.

                                                              Marp can also export PDF if you don’t want to code. It looks like they further develop it here

                                                              == EDIT ==

                                                              PDF export is now available within reveal-md. See here

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                                                                I thought that I will see EFAIL somewhere in there.

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                                                                  Yes! That is not a PGP issue, that is a mail client issue.

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                                                                    Concretelly, its HTML mail issue.

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                                                                      It is not. It is issue with email clients that can’t correctly parse multipart/mixed content, and did not separate text/html parts from application/pkcs7-mime parts. HTML only allowed sending those contents out to the attacker. Without botched parsing there wouldn’t be any problems. But still, it is true that HTML allowed to exfiltrate the data.

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                                                                  What if you can’t because your client literally doesn’t let you? Demanding email in one form or another is extremely elitist.

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                                                                    There is info on email clients that support plaintext email in that page. Only two email clients don’t support sending plaintext emails at all: Afterlogic and Mailspring.

                                                                    1. 5

                                                                      Exactly - the site explains why plaintext email is better for the end user in simple terms goes through most common mail clients to explain how to use plaintext email.

                                                                      Furthermore, there are simple instructions on how to contribute if somethingvisn’t mentioned.

                                                                      It’s not elitist - this is very much by the people, for the people, in the people’s interest.

                                                                      1. 5

                                                                        If this was “by the people, for the people”, then the people involved (the contributors to Alpine Linux) probably should have been /asked/ first.

                                                                        But then, the people have spoken, so I suppose this whole silly thing doesn’t matter any more.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          To clarify, I wasn’t referring to the Alpine situation, simply to the site and its message. The Alpine situation is certainly different, if they didn’t know that HTML mail would be blocked.

                                                                          Having said that, I don’t think that it should have been as much ofva surprise as some people are saying it was; Drew is very open aboutvhis views on the matter, and you’d have thought that at least a brief check of who they were dealing with would have been performed.

                                                                      2. 2

                                                                        And the iOS Mail client.

                                                                      3. 9

                                                                        There is nothing elitist in preventing big security risk. What do you miss ?

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                                                                          Which shouldn’t be an issue anyway because Unicode has an emoticon block.

                                                                          Edit: looks like you removed that part, sorry

                                                                        2. 3

                                                                          I don’t have anything against the end user (elitism). They are picking whatever matching their skillset or their neighbor use.

                                                                          Now if you are in the middle of a technical discussion on a mailing list about the network, I’m okay with throwing away mail with broken encodings, mail with HTML, mail with a too large signature, …

                                                                          It’s up to the community that build the mail stack to know what they are doing while proposing a TinyMCE-like in their webmail interface. I look at you Google.

                                                                          A point that I think interesting : people using simple technology are elitist against people using crazy (google-scale) technology stacks provided for free and granted without maintenance. Are we not there touching to the core of some decaying hacker culture of working with your own tools ? But hate needs to not be mixed with it.

                                                                          Now, Google does what the user asks for. Google also can mitigate most of the vulnerabilities that goes along with email because it’s Google.

                                                                          My conclusion:

                                                                          HTML comes to mail. Everyone on gmail. Google is big.

                                                                        1. 7

                                                                          Like the Apollo 11 source code, I wish the ISRO made the software for these spacecrafts available for public. I would really like to take a look at the source code that controls these spacecrafts.

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                                                                            That might be huge security risk also. We don’t want spacecrafts crashing down from the sky…

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                                                                              Why is it a security risk?

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                It might be ?