Threads for markosaric

  1. 4

    Nice tool! It’s weird that Firefox even with resistFingerprinting enabled shows as nearly unique while Brave passes the test as randomized.

    1. 3

      Note that AGPL can still be exploited by cloud providers, and unfortunately it doesn’t always play well with other open-source projects that have more permissive licenses.

      1. 9

        what do you mean that it “can still be exploited by cloud providers”?

        1. 2

          If you’re really curious, read on why mongodb, confluent and redis (among others) changed their license to ones that aren’t authorized by the OSI.

          1. 3

            so by “exploit” you mean they can benefit from it for free, while sharing any modifications

            1. 3

              No, I mean they can drive the authoring entity out of business, without ever having to make any modification in the first place.

              1. 1

                Like re-implementing the project and offering as a service with compatible interface?

                1. 3

                  Sounds like Google vs Oracle =)

          2. 1

            I think they are talking about one of the scenarios the article explicitly wants to avoid.

            We want to prevent corporations from offering Plausible as a service without contributing to the open source project

            With the AGPL, they are only forced to share the code, they can don’t have to actually improve it. After all plausible is selling a support service, not software. A bigger company can offer the same service.

            1. 4

              plausible doesn’t seem to be worried about that, since they are moving to the AGPL. i would think the developer of a product would have an edge in the support market over other companies offering support for a product they don’t develop.

              but i see how any use of a product could be considered “exploitation.” it’s just the nature of free software that anyone can use it and modify it as they wish.

              1. 4

                There doesn’t seem to be a license that’s accepted in the open source world and that prevents the cloud companies from offering the product as a service. What MongoDB and others did doesn’t seem to have been well received even though I do understand their concerns and think that’s there’s a need for a license like that.

                AGPL at least makes the playing field a bit more even and fair as a large corporation cannot just take from us but have to be clear about the relationship, give us credit and open any of their modifications. Then it’s up to us to make sure we communicate well so people are aware of what’s happening and can take that into consideration when they’re making a choice who to use.

                1. 1

                  Nothing stops someone from hosting a managed service and also releasing all of their changes. If the win is that actual hosting, then that is the actual value. The only thing actually stopping them is not wanting to release the code, which is kinda ironic.

                  1. 1

                    With AGPL the have to allow any users to get a copy of the source. This isn’t quite the same as “contributing” (upstreamin changes) but since any of those users could send the changes upstream many consider it “good enough for rock ’n roll” to say it requires contributing

                2. 4

                  Do you have an example of other permissive licenses that conflict?

                  1. 3

                    To the best of my understanding, a project that’s MIT or Apache 2.0 cannot use a GPL or AGPL project, because xGPL licenses are copyleft and effectively turn any project that uses them into xGPL as well.

                    If the goal is mainly to prevent exploitation by the big players, then it’s a bit like burning your home to get rid of the ants. There have been attempts to produce licenses that are better suited for this purpose, however most of them end up doing it by “descriminating between fields of endeavor” (e.g. cloud hosting), and so the OSI deems them as “not open-source”, but rather “source available”.

                    1. 4

                      An MIT licensed project may have an AGPL dependency, but the distributed combination (or binary when linking, exact artifacts depend on stack) will be effectively AGPL. Some projects even have optional depndencies based on the license you want for your artifacts.

                      Having an artifact be AGPL is only an issue if you plan to distribute as “cloed source”.

                      1. 1

                        Yes, it means every project that depends on you must be open-source as well, including small start-ups that try to remains competitive using their unique technology. Perhaps that’s what you want, but it’s not necessarily the best scenario for the world of open-source, or the world in general.

                        1. 5

                          Really not sure how preventing a startup from taking our freely given work and using it to produce something that is not open source is bad for anyone? That seems like the goal. They can release their code, or spend the money to write their own and not steal from the public commons.

                          1. 4

                            i think the mindset is that anything that could prevent an entrepreneur from bringing a product to market could be bad because the product might end up helping people. some people have that mindset.

                            1. 1

                              I could try to argue the point, but instead let me ask you: Why do the MIT and Apache licenses exist in the first place, and why are they so popular? And why have they been gaining popularity every year in the last decade? (see: https://resources.whitesourcesoftware.com/blog-whitesource/open-source-licenses-trends-and-predictions)

                              According to your logic, most open-source code should choose to be GPL, no?

                              1. 1

                                because more and more open source projects are funded by tech companies that would like to use them in their proprietary projects

                                1. 1

                                  So 70% of opensource is funded by commercial tech companies?

                                  1. 1

                                    i would think less

                        2. 2

                          Ah, yes, that sounds right. I was worried that there was maybe something I didn’t know about in case the licenses are combined the other way around. Ie. an (A)GPL project using a MIT/Apache 2.0 library should be fine, I think?

                          I understand the concern about using AGPL for libraries, frameworks, etc, but it doesn’t look like a bad pick for application-type stuff, like OP’s product. The only type of derivative would be a fork/branch.

                    1. 3

                      Only thing I am worried about is the JS code injected into other pages, especially when you want to use some of it’s functions more directly (for example for better integration with stuff or so on). I hope that they will keep that under more permissive license as otherwise it can cause some problems in some applications.

                      1. 6

                        thanks! we’ll keep the JS code itself on MIT just to avoid any possible confusion in the future.

                      1. 16

                        I just checked and it seems like uBlock Origin blocks plausible too, so it might be even more.

                        1. 4

                          I did the study with June numbers while Plausible was not on any blocklists until yesterday so the numbers should be accurate for a more “average” web audience. Should have done a study today for just one day with traffic from Lobsters, Hacker News etc. Would expect much higher numbers but my intention was to look into a less tech-savvy audience and their use of blocking.

                        1. 12

                          The best source of data for your own website is still access.log

                          1. 2

                            My idea was to use server logs too but AWStats showed more than 100% higher number of unique visitors and more than 18 times higher number in page views (both compared to Plausible numbers) so I excluded it from the study as I thought it’s very inaccurate.

                            1. 1

                              how can that be?

                              did you consider analog or another log analyzer?

                              1. 3

                                despite AWStats filtering bots, many do get through. It was easy to see as most viewed pages according to AWStats were back end pages etc. i tried Webalizer with similar results too. i published the stats here: https://plausible.io/blog/server-log-analysis

                                1. 2

                                  Oh, yeah. The amount of bot traffic on a public website these days is ridiculous.

                                  I’ve started locking down my sites with httpauth and a simple login combo.

                                  1. 2

                                    Is there some sort of fail2ban for http servers that bans IPs if there are more than X requests in Y seconds, where X and Y are some values that humans typically don’t achieve?

                                    1. 2

                                      I think you can indeed just actually use fail2ban. Should be possible to make a rule for this.

                                      1. 2

                                        Oh, it can parse webserver logs? I should read up on this!

                                        1. 2

                                          It can parse any log file. It uses regexes to determine when to trigger rules, iirc

                          1. 5

                            I am using Plausible, a month with them and enjoying it a lot.

                            1. 2

                              Plausible was covered in detail in the last week’s article. That’s how I found out about it and am now happily using it for kitspace.org.

                              1. 1

                                Glad to hear that Kaspar, thanks! That was such a nice article that introduced couple of great GA alternatives to many new people, really appreciative of Ben’s coverage!

                              2. 1

                                Thanks very much for these nice words Guillermo!

                                (I’m the co-founder of Plausible)

                              1. 8

                                Thanks Ben for a nice overview of some of the issues with Google and GA, and also thanks very much for a great review of Plausible Analytics (I’m working on it with Uku). We’re trying to make more site owners aware of these issues and have at least some of them consider removing GA.

                                We released the beta of our self-hosted solution (exact same product as our cloud solution) last week so are having some beta testers currently before releasing the first stable version for those who prefer to manage it themselves.

                                1. 4

                                  Nice to see more people switching to Linux!

                                  You might like Flameshot for taking screenshots and for the ability to edit them (add blur, add arrows, draw etc) immediately after taking them.

                                  I haven’t experienced problems you’re mentioning on Firefox. I believe default Firefox on Fedora is Wayland so if you try SwayWM, it should run Firefox Wayland perfectly which now includes native hardware video acceleration. See this recent development.

                                  1. 3

                                    This is awesome, thanks for sharing!

                                    I’ll give sway another shot. Maybe TreeStyleTabs was the problem rather than Firefox itself, maybe I was a little hasty there.

                                  1. 10

                                    Pocket will now provide fascinating reads from trusted sources in the UK on new tab. I wonder why did they kill RSS support if they intended Firefox to become news aggregator and reader.

                                    1. 13

                                      Those two are unrelated decisions. The RSS code was bitrotting and that is why it was removed. Pocket is a bundled addon.

                                      Yes, they could’ve shipped a bundled addon for RSS as well. But there are a gazillion RSS addons for Firefox that do a much better job than the built-in feature ever did. They are a single click away.

                                      1. 4

                                        They didn’t need to destroy RSS bookmarks.

                                        1. 5

                                          They explained the reasons for removing it and there are a dozen add-ons that bring that feature and more back.

                                          1. -1

                                            Removing support for something doesn’t mean you deliberately destroy user data.

                                            1. 7

                                              From the linked article:

                                              When we remove live bookmarks, we will:

                                              • Export the details of your existing live bookmarks to an OPML file on your desktop, which other feed readers (including ones that are webextensions) support importing from.
                                              • Replace the live bookmarks with “normal” bookmarks pointing to the URL associated with the live bookmark.
                                              • Open a page on support.mozilla.org that explains what has happened and offers you options for how you could continue consuming those feeds.

                                              So, the data was not destroyed, it was saved in multiple formats including standard formats made to be imported in other solutions. Documentation was provided to guide the transition.

                                              1. 0

                                                So, the data was not destroyed

                                                My data was.

                                                1. 3

                                                  I am sorry, it shouldn’t have been. Have you filled a bug report?

                                        2. 1

                                          “Bitrotting” is never a justification to remove a feature. It worked perfectly fine until they removed it. Now you have to install RSSPreview, so it’s an extra step to get this basic lightweight functionality.

                                          1. 15

                                            Have you read the link I pasted earlier? The way the live bookmarks were built were not compatible with sync, used ancient firefox stuff that they are trying to get rid of and had no way to set read/unread status of a post which is a basic necessity of a rss reader. They also have telemetry showing few people using it and more people using more complete add-ons. Mozilla is making a huge effort trying to make Firefox more nimble and maintainable, and the feature was removed. I liked that feature too, but when you read what people maintaining that code and making decisions said about it you might understand why it was done.

                                            1. 1

                                              The feature I miss is the RSS previews. The justification given in the blog post holds no weight:

                                              the feed viewer has its own “special” XML parser, distinct from the main Firefox one, and has not had a significant update in styling or functionality in the last seven years.

                                              It is illustrative that Mozilla (or whoever wrote this post) thinks seven years is too long to wait before a styling update. This attitude is responsible for the recent degradation of the about:config page, among other things…

                                              1. 4

                                                You understand that in these seven years Firefox went through a major rework? Working towards removing XUL, XCB, and lots of old code. Adding the Rust bits and new components from Servo. Refactoring the whole UI into an HTML5 based UI. Seven years when we’re talking about what happened in the specific interval mentioned is a lot of changes to the browser code.

                                                Also, as I’ve mentioned multiple times, that feature was:

                                                • Incomplete.
                                                • Not compatible with the current bookmark and sync.
                                                • Better served by multiple add-ons.

                                                People complain about bloat all the time in Firefox. Keep saying that X, Y, Z, features should be add-ons. When they remove a feature that the power users were not using (because they were already using better add-ons) and the casual users were not using (because they didn’t know it existed) taking care to provide a migration path, save the data, and offer alternatives, people cry that they shouldn’t have done it.

                                                It is impossible to please you folks. If they ship some new feature, it is bloat. If they remove something that is hard to maintain and broken, then it is a crime.

                                                Also, the feature is one click away in the add-ons portal. Add-ons exist so that browser vendors don’t need to cover every single feature by themselves.

                                                1. 2

                                                  Also, as I’ve mentioned multiple times, that feature was:

                                                  • Incomplete.
                                                  • Not compatible with the current bookmark and sync.
                                                  • Better served by multiple add-ons.

                                                  I think you may be referring to Live Bookmarks; I’m referring to RSS previews. I don’t believe these bullets apply to RSS previews.

                                                  I also don’t see how Firefox would know how many people used the RSS preview function. If they click on a link to an RSS feed, they would be using it without knowing that they were using it. Then suddenly those links become raw XML and they don’t know that they need the RSSPreview addon to render the page.

                                                  It is impossible to please you folks. If they ship some new feature, it is bloat. If they remove something that is hard to maintain and broken, then it is a crime.

                                                  Converting an RSS feed to HTML is an extremely simple task that provides functionality that people had come to expect with very little code. New features must meet a higher standard of usefulness and code quality because people aren’t already used to them.

                                        3. 12

                                          I guess that RSS is more difficult to monetize. They make money on Pocket using ads.

                                          1. 6

                                            Read the article, talk to people involved, go to mozilla community/slack/matrix and talk to people, and you’ll realize the feature was removed for many reasons none of which is monetization.

                                            1. -1

                                              From the article:

                                              Looking forward, Firefox offers other features to help users discover and read content.

                                              Seems to have plenty to do with monetization.

                                              1. 5

                                                The pocket thing is related to monetization. What I’m talking that is not related to monetization is the Live Bookmarks removal that happened in Firefox 64, which was released in 2018. All I’ve been replying and chatting here is related to that feature, and not pocket. The Live Bookmarks removal happened more than 10 versions ago and was not motivated by monetization.

                                                1. 0

                                                  The quote above was part of the reasoning behind removing RSS support. In other words they wouldn’t have removed RSS support if there weren’t monetized alternatives like Pocket and sponsored content on the home page.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    They removed live bookmarks in 2018.

                                                    The RSS reader was removed in 2018 alongside the live bookmarks feature. They are part of the same source. Stop spreading FUD.

                                                    Pocket sponsored content, which I don’t like either, is not related to the RSS feature.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      What “other features to help users discover and read content” was the quote referring to?

                                                      1. 0

                                                        So they destroyed my data in order to monetize me?

                                                        1. 2

                                                          No, they told you the feature was going to be removed with months in advance. Provided docs on how to to take your data out, and links to alternative solutions for the feature. Your data should have been saved into two different backups: one OPML on your Desktop, and the bookmarks should still be there, they’d just be normal bookmarks instead of live bookmarks.

                                                          If this didn’t happen, then it is a bug and even though I am really sorry for you, it is the case that the only possible solution is to fill a bug report and try to figure out why the documented process failed so that it doesn’t happen to someone else.

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                                            I would financially support a fork of Firefox with all the garbage removed. The home page bullshit, Pocket, all the automatic requests made without user action, and more that I probably don’t know of.

                                            1. 8

                                              At least Firefox does allow us to disable anything we don’t want/need.

                                              1. 15

                                                Not everything. Try running Wireshark before you open Firefox and see if you can configure it to produce zero requests on startup. I tried that last week and there was a request to firefox.settings.services.mozilla.com that I think there’s no about:config setting to disable.

                                                Also, there is the fact that when opening a fresh install of Firefox for the first time you’ll make requests to a bunch of random companies, like Facebook, Google etc. The only way to protect yourself from that is to know it beforehand and disable it via user.js before opening the browser. I don’t think that’s right and I wish I could prevent my browser from telling these companies about me. These things should be opt-in in my view.

                                                1. 7

                                                  If you disable your internet connection before launching Firefox for the first time, would that give you an opportunity to turn everything off without making extra requests first? I agree that it’s crappy that this is even necessary, but maybe this is a simpler workaround than tweaking user.js?

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Good idea!

                                                2. 9

                                                  The megabar issue proves the contrary.

                                                  1. 5

                                                    https://www.userchrome.org/megabar-styling-firefox-address-bar.html#mbarstyler

                                                    This is not an acceptable solution, by the way: like many organizations, Mozilla needs to get better at incorporating feedback and reverting bad changes. But you did claim it was impossible to undo the megabar, when it’s actually perfectly doable. I also figure that a lot of people would be interested in knowing this.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      You don’t even need a userChrome for this, there’s an about:config flag (browser.urlbar.update1 I believe).

                                                      1. 3

                                                        This flag got removed in v77.

                                                      2. 1

                                                        I did not stay it was impossible, but they aim to make changing it as hard as possible. I do not know the reason for Mozilla acting so about such a minute issue.

                                                    2. 2

                                                      This isn’t correct. Look at what’s happening with forced updates, for example. Right now I keep installs performed as Administrator (and run as regular user) so the user can’t update, which results in Firefox throwing up dialogs complaining that it can’t update itself. I think I need to go back to building from source just to remove this garbage, but even building from source is more convoluted than it used to be due to sprawling dependencies.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        You made me realize that this is why Mozilla has zero interest in making an Electron equivalent with Servo.

                                                        A Firefox-like browser without the Firefox corporation would be a huge hit and thus unmonetizable.

                                                    3. 6

                                                      Me too, very much so. Mozilla jumped the shark years back and their attitude does not seem to be improving. Its flagship really deserves a long trip through a detox and weight loss boot camp. It would be a significant effort, though; here are some interesting case studies from Cliqz (RIP) and ungoogled-chromium.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I’d really like to see the Tor-browser without Tor. That seems to move in the right direction and they seem to be able to keep Firefox under control somehow.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Why RIP? Cliqz seems to still be active.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            No, it died, the mothership can’t fund it any more. The servers still run, for the time being.

                                                            It’s a pity.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Holy hell wtf.

                                                              Damn.

                                                        2. 3

                                                          There is IceCat [ https://www.gnu.org/software/gnuzilla/ ], though it’s based on ESR releases.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          This is a great blog post! Similarly, I care about keeping independent blogging alive. Independent blogs disappearing or becoming defunct bothers me. RSS being replaced with Twitter, Facebook, etc. also bothers me.

                                                          I began blogging 14 years ago (see my first blog post). It opened a whole new world for me: I could write about topics I care about and share it with the whole world. Well, the whole world did not visit my blog, only my colleagues and friends did. Occasionally, someone would reach a blog post of mine via a search engine. That was good enough.

                                                          We used to maintain sidebars on our blogs with links to our favourite blogs. Do you know (XKCD still does it in its footer? We could subscribe to any blog via RSS feed. I still fondly remember creating widgets on Netvibes displaying recent posts from my favourite blogs. Later, I moved on to Google Reader but sadly it was discontinued. I think that marked the beginning of the end of the glorious era of independent blogging. I have since moved on to Feedly but that warm feeling of community is gone. My feeds contain very few independent blogs now than it used to before.

                                                          I still provide RSS feed for my blog. I still continue to write blog posts occasionally. But the blogging culture has changed. Most posts these days are written on centralized platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Medium, etc. I wonder what it would take to instil that feeling of a community again.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Thanks for the nice comment and the kind words! So true!

                                                          1. 3

                                                            I’ve a question, which I suppose some people might consider trolling, but I do want to know:

                                                            Why keep blogging alive and thriving? What does that gain?

                                                            I’m not arguing or even implying that it’s not worthwhile. I ask because I’ve heard the sentiment several times on the past years, and I don’t see how it’s related either to the blog posts I’ve written or those I’ve proofread on for friends. Each of those has an audience to reach and a message to deliver, but “alive and thriving” doesn’t seem to matter for either audience or message. Some other things do. For example, being indexable by Google and other search engines is very important for the purpose of some postings. But if “alive and thriving” means that there should exist many other blogs with many new postings, then I don’t see how that makes a difference for actual blog postings such as the example mentioned in that audience-and-goal rant. So what does it mean, what benefit does it bring, why is it something to work towards?

                                                            If you want to keep blogging alive and thriving, you should answer, because one of the big advantages of writing is that it clears your mind and improves your own understanding. Understanding the nature of a goal helps understanding how to better work towards the goal.

                                                            EDIT: I want to digress. Writing to gain understanding is IMO a good reason to write some/many blog posts. There aren’t many formats where you can write five hundred words on any subject you want, but your blog is your kingdom.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              One of the main reasons for me is that personal blogs and websites make the web different and more personal too. All Facebook profiles look the same, all Twitter profile likewise. If we all move to them and produce and consume all of our content on those closed platforms, those platforms would be in full control and will be able to decide what happens with the future of the web. Keeping independent places alive and thriving keeps that free spirit and independence of the internet alive and thriving too.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                If I’m allowed some rather unkind phrasing: You’re saying that people who write should do it more on their own blogs and less on big prefab platforms so that readers experience a more diverse and more personal web. If that’s it, then I can see why the central platforms won so much — I could forget about my server’s uptime or about editing my CSS to be suitably mobile-friendly, and the people who suffer by seeing reduced diversity aren’t me. I gain ease of use and perhaps reliability, they lose diversity.

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                                                              I have been blogging for 15+ years. I think looking for external validation is short sighted. While people have contacted me occasionally and thanked me, and I have even gotten a few $$$ from my blog, the real reason I write is intrinsic. It clears my mind and provides a way for me to realize what I am really thinking. I do it publicly because otherwise I wouldn’t (not much of a journaler).

                                                              However, if you don’t like the way the internet is currently organized, blogging is a great way to make a small change. Never been easier, all you have to commit is your time.

                                                              1. 9

                                                                This is the same with me. I typically write a post describing how I got to a certain conclusion and what choices I made along the way. It helps me internalise those and then look back and refresh my memory when needed. If it helps others who stumble upon the post - all the better. But it is not the main reason.

                                                                IMO blogging for fame or money ultimately will lead to SEO, marketing, merch and all other things of this nature in one form or another.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  You’re describing a very valid use case for a blog. It is just as much there for you as it is for someone else that might discover it and find it useful. It’s a good balance to have.

                                                                2. 8

                                                                  Likewise, I’ve been doing it in some form since the late 90s, mostly in the same place.

                                                                  I don’t run any analytics, but if I had to guess I’d assume that my readership spikes as high as a few dozen, once or twice a year, but mostly hovers in the range of 7 or 8. I could name most of them - friends, family, former coworkers. Writing for that handful of people feels valuable, as does documenting technical stuff in public view. Still, after publishing something on the order of 400k words I’ve got to say that the ratio of fame and fortune to time & effort expended is not exactly impressive, if that’s what I were looking for out of it.

                                                                  Not that there’s no external validation: A long history of public writing has probably been narrowly better for getting jobs than not, though I’ll be extremely unsurprised if it bites me in a career-limiting way one of these years. Once in a while I get a few internet points. But I wouldn’t really advise most people to look for it. I selfishly want more blogs to read, but I also think that a whole lot of people might do just as well writing a newsletter for a handful of close connections or similar.

                                                                  (I’d also point out that airing your thinking and details about your life on the public network has turned out to be a very, very different risk proposition than it seemed when I got a GeoCities page in ~1997. At a bare minimum, you’re teaching the ever-growing panopticon more about you, and there are plenty of scenarios where it leaves you more vulnerable to malicious actors, of whom there are plenty.)

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Good point about newsletters! For some it can be an even more convenient option for a platform that they own and control.

                                                                  2. 4

                                                                    It’s amazing when you have such a strong internal drive and motivation. And it shows in the fact that you have managed to blog for so long. It definitely works for some people. In my experience, a lot of people don’t write with intrinsic reasons as their main motivation which is perhaps why more either quit or simply choose to have a social media profile rather than a website. That external validation is so much easier to get on social media with likes, comments, views etc. With a blog, it takes more effort.

                                                                    1. 8

                                                                      That external validation is so much easier to get on social media with likes, comments, views etc.

                                                                      100%. And I’m no saint, I like it when a post of mine gets traffic, a comment, or hits the front page of a popular site.

                                                                      I just think that extrinisic motivation will fade.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Makes sense!

                                                                  1. 12

                                                                    A suggested addition: Publish a feed, link it prominently, and encourage feedreader adoption.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      The death of Google Reader was really the big start of this move towards closed platforms. Most people never really switched to an alternative and simply went onto Facebook and Twitter. I doubt Google had that in mind when they did it.

                                                                    1. 7

                                                                      This is why I recommend everyone to use https://git.sr.ht/~sircmpwn/openring . It basically fetches posts from blogs you follow and integrates them into your blog.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Very nice idea indeed.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Thanks for sharing!

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          Hi Marko… thanks for menthioning my post on yours.

                                                                          One problem are big companies using their blogs to attract people to their site, they even hire marketing companies to work on SEO and do a lot of marketing for their blogs. That does not always mean good content.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            You’re welcome!

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            The issue is that beyond the networks of hackernews and lobsters people do not really care about content on personal websites. Then, that causes that if one wants to support themselves they ought to run a blog which will be of interest to techie crowd, so a lot of in-depth topics are out of the picture.

                                                                            I think (I do not have any data, would be thankful if somebody knew right keywords to find such research) Majority of content consumption is on (i.e.) YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. And the issue is that with these networks many people forgot about RSS and without RSS I can’t think of any real retention.

                                                                            What I also see is that low-quality content retention is outright awful (https://www.digitalinformationworld.com/2018/09/infographic-how-people-read-content-online.html). But, then if you are freelance blogger you have to make premium/high-quality content.

                                                                            Also, huge thanks for the guide for monetization, I run a small blog which is static HTML only, and insomuch as I do not treat it seriously, I am thankful for some ideas to push forwards when I get some traffic. Then, I have a question related to that - how viable is it to give advertisers access logs instead of Analytics (as my personal views are keeping me from forcing such software).

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              You’re welcome! It’s more convenient to simple stay and consume on the big networks but it also shows the power they have over our attention and time.

                                                                              About analytics: Difficult to say as they would definitely not be used to that with GA being the default. But it’s worth trying. Perhaps you could find advertisers that are more aligned with your views and then it might be less of a hurdle.

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                                                                                If the problem with GA is that it’s third party, you could always run e.g. Matomo locally on your own server, which could provide a GA-like access to statistics. If you want to avoid javascript, it’s possible to feed Matomo with access log files, or you could use e.g. https://goaccess.io/ which also consumes access logs.

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                                                                                Completely agree! I run ProtonVPN pretty much at all times and they have the option to simply connect to the fastest server. Often it happens that it is from a country I don’t speak the language to so I hate when sites automatically show me that language. I understand the idea but there are better ways of doing this.

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                                                                                  I sort of hate GDPR for this cookie consent thing. Pre-GDPR, only EU business had this invasive, (most of the time) ‘whatever you say, we will set cookie unless you disable the cookies from the browser’ type shoutings. Now, lots of website does this.

                                                                                  As a non-EU citizen, I am not interested in being forced to see an EU-law-specific notice, when I don’t really have a choice. (In my jurisdiction, cookie notices are required in the Privacy Policy, but that doesn’t require you a banner.)

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                                                                                    The thing is GDPR is not invasive. It is the illegal implementation from sites that want to force you to say “yes” to them selling your data to third-parties for non-essential purposes (such as the targeted advertising purposes) that makes it invasive.

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                                                                                      You really should read the article linked at the very top of this page..

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                                                                                      Nice article! It also sounds like a fair and logical way to implement such an essential function of a browser. Let it help us build better websites and better user experiences.

                                                                                      We cannot have anything good though as there’s always someone ready to abuse the system and take advantage of it. So now we have the privacy laws, millions using adblockers and recently even mainstream browsers stopping the malicious behaviour of bad actors by default.