Threads for mavnn

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    My first thought after reading that is that somebody clearly needs a hug.

    Our code really isn’t that bad. It’s just that it has to interact with everybody else’s code, which is clearly a witches' brew of nonsense. Like the thingy that happens to throw exceptions that Visual Studio won’t catch, or the database that doesn’t do CTEs for some reason (cough, mysql, cough), or the ORM that you can tell to delete orphaned rows, but will only actually do it sometimes, or…

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      To me all these codes we write look like genies and daemons, who are just waiting for you to give a wrong command. A little slip of the tongue and they will pounce on it, and do things you never intended them to do.

      Bartimaeus Triology anyone?

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        Or Jack Vance’s sandestin magic.

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          A whole novel based on this concept in reverse: http://www.baenebooks.com/p-1632-the-wizardry-compiled.aspx

          Significantly better than the “back of book” would lead you to believe.

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      I enjoyed the article. It actually convinced me to be a “fundamentalist” in my current job language, but… writing a really persuading article combating the “ambient monad” struck me as odd given that I have recently witnessed a tweet of the author where he claims:

      I’m happy to leverage the ambient monad

      I think I’ll just assume that he’s performing pro-level trolling on Twitter knowing his playful attitude from the Channel 9 videos.

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        Given his work on Rx in various (definitely) non-functional languages, there’s a definite smell of epic trolling. On the other hand, I think he ends with a serious point - it would be nice in non-functional languages to be able to mark code as “pure”. .NET started doing this with the “Pure” attribute in code contracts, but it never quite made it to being usable in my mind.

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          Why is it trolling to build better tools for real languages while simultaneously wishing for more?

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            It’s not, and in case I’ve given the wrong impression I have a great deal of respect for Meijer and his work.

            What is trolling though, is to write a detailed rebuttal of why the strategy you’re currently prompting doesn’t work, tweaking the nose of people of the other side of an on going argument by pointing out their solution isn’t very good either and then sneaking in an actual practical suggestion at the end. In fact, I’d go as far as to say it’s a masterpiece of trolling that is far more thought provoking and engaging due to it’s ‘trollish’ nature.

            Trolling how it should be done, not as puerile sexist/racist/plain stupid stuff you normally see.

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              Ahh.. I often forget that trolling has a non-idiotic side as well. I understand your point much better now and agree.