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    A while back I bought two of these USB Thinkpad keyboards, using the old (good) keyboard layout: https://www.newegg.com/lenovo-thinkpad-usb-wired/p/N82E16823218006

    I have used the crap out of them. They are the absolute best.

    Internally it’s just a USB controller attached to the same keyboard that shipped in older Thinkpads, so I’ve already fixed up at least one keyboard with parts from eBay.

    Despite things like Vimium or i3 or other ways to reduce mouse usage, most folks still need a mouse from time to time. Reducing the travel time from your keyboard to your mouse seems really high value to me, and I’m lost why most of these custom or fancy keyboard people don’t focus on having a nearby mouse of some kind?? I’m not the OP of this thread, but I highly empathize: https://www.reddit.com/r/MechanicalKeyboards/comments/626sga/how_about_trackpoints/

    These Thinkpad trackpoint keyboards are perfect. The mouse is right there.

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      I love my shinobi tex, a mechanical homage to the thinkpad design: https://tex.com.tw/products/shinobi

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        Just got yesterday mine. Such a pleasure to have again some key travel, and feeling the fingers match the keys. Really nice to alternate with the laptop keyboard (X1E Gen1) and is an incentive to work more at the desk with a big screen. For me the trackpoint on the shinobi work much more precise and easy. I was expecting a little more pressure resistance from the keys, but in the end I think it is quite comfortable. It’s really nice too that there is a deeper mold in the keycaps. Was expensive, but I’m definitely happy about this purchase.

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          oh my gosh i’ve never seen this before, this is amazing!

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            Woah! This is the first keyboard I’ve seen in years that tempts me…

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              How are the key symbol printings holding up? I got mine a week ago and I’m already noticing L-Ctl, Esc, and frequent letters fading. It’s not a big deal since I don’t really look but I’m surprised.

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                I’ve been using mine for ~9 months daily, and while it’s true that some letters started fading very quickly, they seem to have reached a “plateau”. Definitely the discolouring has slowed its pace or the keycaps would be blank by now.

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                  Same here. Fading on frequent used keys. Been using it since last november.

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                Thank you for your comment. I feel the same way about trackpoints, and your comment made me order a ThinkPad USB keyboard :)

                I really like the newer chiclet design, so I’ve picked a more recent model. Luckily they seem to be designed with a similar concept; reuse of the existing laptop keyboard design (see https://dontai.com/wp/2018/09/06/thinkpad-wired-usb-keyboard-with-trackpoint-0b47190-disassembly-and-cleaning/ for disassembly). The number of key rows don’t really bother me, and for all I’ve tried I don’t feel comfortable on keyboards with mechanical switches. Too many hours on a ThinkPad, I think.

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                  i am very happy lenovo is still making these keyboards, even if it’s the new layout

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                  I have one of these and I love it! I’m a sucker for the trackpoint and I love the pre-chiclet key design. It’s super portable too - I can easily throw it in my backpack with my laptop if I’m going to be out of the (home) office all day.

                  It’s a little sad that these version seem to be so unavailable these days :(

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                    I’d recommend ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II because it is wireless - via Bluetooth or Wireless Nano USB Dongle.

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                      I own the first generation as wired version and the micro USB socket is absolute garbage. Two out of three keyboards lose USB connection when the cable is moved slightly. But, this problem can be fixed pretty easily by disassembling the keyboard, bending the socket back to normal shape and then adding a large solder blob to the socket case such that it can’t bend that easily anymore. I fixed both keyboards reliably with this procedure.

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                    I know this is slightly tangential to your post, but the dependency issue in getlantern/idletiming is getting a fix: https://github.com/getlantern/mtime/pull/2

                    FWIW, thanks for pointing it out :D

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                      tbh this whole package might not even be necessary any more. The time.Time method Sub now gives you a monotonic difference between two time.Time values that ignores changes in system clock time. This was added in Go 1.9, it’s mentioned here in the change notes. The original source for what you’re using predates the release of Go 1.9; it cites the issue that Go 1.9 closed, and the issue history in turn cites the library you’re using as an example of why the standard library needs fixing. So … that once-useful thing is now a part of the standard library, and I’m going to wager you can probably dispense with it entirely and just use the time package as-is. Maybe there’s something subtle going on here that I’m not noticing, but it looks like you can get some free dependency-shedding.