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    Garden work! Need to get the garden ready for winter. Problem is, I am new to all of this, so basically don’t know where to start (that’s what you get for buying a house with too much garden!)

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      Oh man. I sometimes think back to the days in university when I was solving calculus and algebra. Mind you, I was average in class, my grades where OK, but not great. But. My brain was a machine back then! I could integrate stuff in several steps in my head at the same time holding three or four other things in my mind at the same time.

      I often marvel at how increasingly stupid I have become over the course of my 15 year career and I often think about how incredible my mental capabilities where in my early twenties. I don’t know if it is my aging brain that’s the difference, or if it is just the fact that I was solving math problems every day for five years, back then.

      Anyway. Sorry if it was not relevant. Just something I’ve kept in for too long. I should dig up my old calculus books and do some problems recreationally and nostalgically. Math is awesome.

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        I often marvel at how increasingly stupid I have become over the course of my 15 year career and I often think about how incredible my mental capabilities where in my early twenties. I don’t know if it is my aging brain that’s the difference, or if it is just the fact that I was solving math problems every day for five years, back then.

        In my experience, it’s really the latter :-). I’m in a pretty similar situation. Luck and some programming knowledge made me the programming monkey in an otherwise serious research team back when I was in my 3rd year of uni – I could comfortably do triple integrals in my head, whereas now my brain hurts when I run into simple first year math. Meanwhile, some of my former colleagues are still comfortable doing all sorts of complicated math and they’re entering their fourties. I’m a few years behind them and integration by parts makes my heart race now. But they did spend the last fifteen years doing hard math, and I didn’t.

        The good news is that most of it seems to come back fairly quickly, after surprisingly little practice. A few years ago I had a brief re-encounter with some pretty tough DSP problems (tl;dr real-time data acquisition and noise cancellation), which was double tough because, while I was extremely interested in signal processing, I never had time to study it as much as I wanted. After two days or so of how the fsck did I fit all this into my brain and I hope Fourier died a slow and painful death, I was surprisingly comfortable. I did have to peek at a handbook a little more often than I would’ve had to ten years before, but mostly because I was paranoid about not remembering the formulae and I kept double-checking them.

      1. 3

        Finishing my three last days at my current job, so I’m finishing up documentation and starting to outline what specific personal projects I want to work on throughout the rest of the year.

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          Will you be spending the rest of the day doing personal projects?

          1. 1

            I assume you meant to say the rest of the week… nah, I’m probably just going to chill after Wednesday and only get to work on my personal projects next week.

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          Just curious, what technologies would one use for the handling of the events in this kind of implementation? Apache Kafka? Is that suitable for intra-application communication?

          1. 1

            Kafka is quite poplar these days or Amazon Kinesis.

            Is that suitable for intra-application communication?

            If you already have Kafka for other stuff, sure. Though it’s optimized for volume, not low latency at low volume. For a small volume application setting up and maintaining Kafka would be an overkill, IMO. A Postgres table will do, especially given that free-form event specific data could go to json table (or just be serialized on application level).

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            I have a cold. So cannot join the family for a birthday party. Instead, I’ll stay at home and try to finish some Advent of Code problems.

            1. 1

              Not much technical stuff. I’m loosing sleep over a decision if I should lump sum invest some money I got, or If I should spread it out over a couple of months. Normally I would just put them into the same global index fund I’ve been using for savings, and then forgot about them. But the way the markets are right now…

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                Always lump sum. Always

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                If I can say so myself, I was a brilliant jerk. I don’t want to go out to say that I am brilliant in general (I’m definitely not), but in the very little niche, where I was working, I was the best there was. But, I was that a jerk. For years. For me, what made me a jerk, was that I expected that everyone around me understood exactly the same things that I did. I got frustrated when people did not understand, or even held a different opinion than I did. I was so full of myself. In some ways, sometimes, I must admit, it must have bordered on bullying. Im not proud of that.

                I am happy that the organisation around me, and the people around me, gave me the chance to improve. I did improve as I matured and I work in that same organisation with those same people today but there is a completely different atmosphere. The key was for me to get my head out of my arse, or out of the clouds. And realise that everyone has different skills, at different levels and that believing that I knew everything was a sure sign that I knew too little (or in this case was lacking in understanding and experience). Talking to people also improved the situation. The people I had the hardest time cooperating with (because, honestly, at the time, I believed them to be completely worthless at their jobs) made the situation improve quickly. Just sitting down and having a coffee with them once a week. It enabled me to widen my perspective and opinion about them, and made me realise that we just had different skills.

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                  I thought about fuzzing today. When I was totally new to software engineering, I found the idea of fuzzing to be great. Perfect, I thought. Just randomly send inputs to see if my system breaks. As the practice of engineering become more ingrained in my identity, I started to dislike fuzzing. I did not agree with the idea of having a test that did not do the same thing, every time. “Tests, just as any code, should be deterministic”, I firmly believed. I would’ve had a hard time motivating why I held those beliefs. My gut was telling me that “I just don’t like it”. I want to design things, I wanted to decide what goes in, so that I could verify the output to be exactly what I expected it to be. As I’ve gained more experience, and many more years of software practice under my belt, I, today, realised that I have no problem with fuzzing at all, anymore. In fact, I really like the idea of fuzzing. Whatever finds the bugs.

                  It wasn’t fuzzing that was interesting to me today. What was interesting to me was how I previously had formed an opinion about something, without having very much experience or facts about it, with only some kind of notion of “it’s not engineering”. It’s nice, sometimes, to find that you have grown in your trade and that you have matured.

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                    The only additional point I’d like to mention: fuzzing is just one piece of the whole “quality” puzzle and not the whole. It is necessary, not “necessary and sufficient”. :-)

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                    I have no side project. No real hobby. I’m bored out of my mind. I feel burned out. Empty. I have no idea what I am doing this weekend and the worst part is that I don’t even feel like doing anything.

                    Have a good weekend everyone.

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                      So what? It’s okay to “do nothing”.

                      The best ideas I’ve had always came from seemingly wasting time. Or even if nothing comes out of it. You rested. That’s the reason we have weekends!

                      Take a walk. Call someone you haven’t talked to for a long while. Write a custom Hugo theme for your website. Binge/rewatch some show.

                      Have a nice weekend!

                      1. 2

                        I know that doing nothing is OK. But, I believe I am addicted to being busy. I believe many of us are. Maybe it is the stress. Or maybe it’s the hormone response of it. Maybe my mind and body is so used to being overloaded that when it isn’t, that excess energy is just flooding over. Maybe it’s the fact that having too much to do, makes it easy to not do the things that I don’t want to do. I can always prioritise other, more important, things. Whatever it is, I am addicted to it. But it’s over. For now. 12 years of stress and being overworked is coming to and end and this weekend seems to be the very first days of getting clean.

                      2. 5

                        Have you considered sleeping in?

                        1. 4

                          Let’s trade goods. I got some Swedish licorice from a guy I met through work, he works in Vasteras. Can’t find that good stuff here in the US. Before he left I gave him some locally made mustard, lol.

                          1. 3

                            This hit home a little more than I thought it would.

                            I hope you get a chance to relax, regardless.

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                            I sold my company (that I founded 10+ years ago) this week… Have been working day and night with that deal for the last couple of weeks and months. So, this weekend I will try to stay away from the computer, just try to relax and get my stress level down a bit, and spend some time with my oldest son exploring forrest.

                            1. 5

                              Congratulations!

                              1. 3

                                That sounds great - I imagine you feel liberated, and have not yet grasped your freedom. I am happy for you, high five!

                                Would you mind sharing some lessons learned?

                              1. 3

                                I can’t agree with the “clean as you go” engineer. I guess this depends on how one defines adjacent code. Refactoring working legacy code adds unnecessary risk and increases time to deliver the change that was asked of you.

                                1. 5

                                  I once worked at a project which had excellent test coverage. Automatic unit test, functional test, integration tests and acceptance / system / scenario test. It was incredibly easy to work there. We where always pair programming and we always refactored code. We often refactored code as part of understanding the code which we where working in. The refactoring itself never really caused any problems as far as I can remember.

                                  However, this was a very special place, and a long time ago. I’ve never seen such a well functioning team or code base since then.

                                  1. 1

                                    There is a saying, that all code that is easy to refactor will ultimately be replaced by code that is hard to refactor (because nobody will want to touch the hard-to-refactor code). That’s why I’m generally against refactoring as well, especially during work on a clearly-defined task.

                                    Unless there is an explicit task to perform refactoring, then I’m not against it ;), but it must be calculated, i.e. main question is what benefits refactoring will provide, and what are the risks.

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                                    I’ve used PopOS as my main driver for the last couple of years, on two different machines. I agree with the write up here. I need a great calendar app. It’s my life. The calendar app on MacOS is the only app I know that works for me aside from Google Calendar. Same goes for the email client. The thing is I hate using web apps, I need to run the apps to feel comfortable, I hate working out of a tab in a browser.

                                    Linux is also not as polished. I have to spend more time on just running the system then I do with MacOS. There is always something going wrong. The big annoyances for me are:

                                    • Videoconferencing in Firefox works badly and often crashes the whole system.
                                    • I often have problems with USB headsets if they are plugged in our out, need to reboot to get it to work. -Trackpad feel is horrible
                                    • I often get problems with package managers getting into problems.

                                    I’m going back to MacOS later this year. Not convinced with Linux. I really would like to love it, but I just don’t.

                                    1. 3

                                      Sounds like a lot of these problems are correlated with PopOS. Have you considered using a more reliable package manager for example? Nixos is quite popular and you can just take a config off the shelf to try it.. For example something like this: https://github.com/hlissner/dotfiles (made by the guy who made the popular doom-emacs configuration).

                                      1. 3

                                        I wouldn’t recommend using NixOS unless you really want to get deep into the weeds of things, and this is coming from someone who loves using it as her daily driver.

                                        1. 1

                                          ? I use PopOS daily and have no such issues. It’s just a customized Ubuntu after all.

                                      1. 2

                                        Oh the Nostalgia. To think that I’m so old that I’ve experienced a big chunk of computer history is mind blowing. I started out with Commodore 64 and a VIC20. I used Intel 8086 and Intel 8088, my 486 66mhz I remember fondly, as I remember my Pentium from Digital (what a beast it was). After that point it went fast and from that point on I cannot really remember any particular computer as very special, up until my first Mac with OSX.

                                        1. 1

                                          OSX

                                          … which also turned 20 a week ago.

                                          1. 3

                                            I’ve never been a mac user but I wonder if the upgrade path/user experience feels much diifferent over these 20 years of OS X compared to Windows (either 3.11 up to 5 years ago, or Win98/2000 up till Win 10)…

                                            Because despite having used all these Windows systems (3.11, NT 4, 95A,B,C, 98, 98 SE, Me, 2000, XP, 7, 10, and not Vista and 8/8.1) - while some people might say the gui is kinda samey or had a clear evolution, my /experience/ is so vastly different.

                                            3.11 was basic but worked.

                                            95A was a complete shitshow and crashed daily and I had to reinstall once a month, at least

                                            95 B and C were tolerable

                                            98 was somehow fresher but less stable again

                                            98 SE was pretty good

                                            Me I don’t really remember

                                            2000 was awesome (after the first few months with driver problems for some games)

                                            XP was ok

                                            7 was solid

                                            10 is a step back in my opinion but it’s close to 7 in quality

                                            1. 2

                                              The 1984 original Mac was “the first [UI] worth criticizing”, to misquote Alan Kay. Once you upgraded the RAM it was very capable, and quickly launched desktop publishing once PageMaker was released.

                                              The later 80s brought color and bigger screen support, some limited multitasking, networking, and a huge filesystem improvement.

                                              System 7 in 1991 was a big step with a fully-color GUI, multitasking, IAC, and tons of usability improvements. But under the hood it was still quite primitive with no memory protection or pre-emptive scheduling.

                                              The rest of the 90s saw only incremental improvements since Apple kept working on a series of failed attempts to build a better OS from scratch and/or port to x86 (Pink/Taligent, Star Trek, Maxwell/Copland).

                                              Finally in 2001 came Mac OS X, which was a NeXT-derived OS using the Mach microkernel, BSD Unix, the “AppKit” evolution of OpenStep, the “Carbon” porting layer for the old Mac APIs, and the “blue box” classic OS emulator to run unported apps. 10.0 was buggy and incomplete, but by 10.2 in 2002 it was solid.

                                              1. 1

                                                When I started working we had a lot of OS 9 macs, I used to only use them to test web pages in Internet Explorer. They crashed often and to a casual Windows/Linux user they weren’t great, but usable.

                                                When a coworker showed me OS X (must have been 10.0) it was kinda amazing, but I didn’t use it a lot, so can’t really comment. But I’ve always felt that mac users have sometimes lamented about good and bad releases, but hardly any game breakers to switch away for a certain release, more of a “been sick of it for a while”:..

                                              2. 1

                                                3.11 was basic but worked.

                                                I worked in the helpdesk in a university library back then. I can’t remember how many people lost their complete dissertations from crashing window 3.11 machines (Combined with having no idea that you need to keep multiple backups on these slow and unreliable floppy disks). Whatever came after might have been bad, but all of them have been better than 3.11.

                                                1. 1

                                                  interesting. I mean we only had it for like 2 years (on one PC) and it was mostly used for Word and Excel but I can’t remember any crashes at all, that’s why I was so surprised that 95A was so bad…

                                                2. 1

                                                  I have been using Windows since 3.11 and was using only Windows (and Dos) up until around Mac OS X. Never used a Mac before that point.

                                                  But for me it has seemed like Windows have been more incremental while OS X release have been more continuous. I mean, If I think back to my original OS X, I kind of remember it being just the same as what I am using today (Big Sur), which is obviously wasn’t. Windows releases however has been more distinct from its previous version, in my mind

                                                  I also used OS/2 (was that what it was called?) along side of Windows 3.11. But to be frank, back in those days, I was mostly using Dos. Windows 3.11, to me as a gamer at the time, didn’t really add anything for my needs.

                                            1. 1

                                              I’m running OpnSense on a Protectli Box as edge router and firewall. A 24p Ubiquiti switch as the main switch. Two small outdoor Ubiquiti switches with POE to power cameras around the house. Another small Ubiquiti switch for the home office.

                                              Three Ubiquiti APs around the house.

                                              Not too happy about the development of Ubiquiti as a company and the latest news in particular.

                                              1. 11

                                                BackBlaze acknowledged this and pushed out a fix. Facebook’s SDKs are notorious for recording far more data than necessary as noted here, so I don’t feel BackBlaze was shipping off data intentionally, and were blindsided by Facebook changing things under them.

                                                1. 35

                                                  BackBlaze is responsible for the code on their website. If they ship code in their web app which ships all the names of the user’s files to Facebook, that’s on them. This is a huge violation of trust from BackBlaze. “A library did it” isn’t an excuse.

                                                  1. 20

                                                    I completely agree, it is certainly a grave mistake on their part. What I meant was that this incident appears to be a result of carelessness rather than malice.

                                                    1. 6

                                                      Ah, makes sense. That is indeed an important thing to point out.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Case or “Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.”?

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Never attribute to malice which can be adequately explained by passing the buck to a library♥

                                                      2. 9

                                                        Absolutely, I mean what did they expect would happen when they include some tracking garbage from facebook? I evaluated them and eventually planned to use them as a block storage provider but canceled my account with them today after I read about the tracking pixel. There’s absolutely zero reason for including this tracking stuff in the admin part of the website.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          The only mitigation I can think of is to code-review (at some level) all diffs of all dependencies (transitively), when any first-level dependency changes.

                                                          It’s even worse if some libraries are loaded from a third party, which could change them at any time.

                                                          I think that is a lot of difficult, challenging work.

                                                          Is there a better idea than the one above? Or is that just the cost of doing business and the best approach would be for us to somehow distribute the load (e.g. a 3rd party, curated, checked, trusted JS stack which covers a common set of modules.

                                                          1. 16

                                                            The mitigation here is substantially simpler, don’t include code loading from or sending data to 3rd parties on pages that contain sensitive business and personal information that you are obligated to protect. Especially when that’s your core business.

                                                            People would be much more understanding of this issue if it was a supply chain attack, it wasn’t, they intentionally included scripts from third parties where there shouldn’t have been any. That the scripts were extracting slightly more data than they thought… really isn’t the issue.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              But why would you like to integrate your customers admin panel with Facebook? It compromises their privacy and your company secrets. The only reason I can imagine is measuring conversions, but again is it worth the risks?

                                                              1. 3

                                                                Well, it’s a trade-off isn’t it. In theory, code reviewing (and self hosting!) every dependency could provide the best security. That’s feasible if you’re comfortable with using few dependencies, but it might not always be possible.

                                                                If you’re not going to be reviewing your dependencies though, the very least you should do is to reflect over whether the dependency is managed by someone who you have reasons to believe aren’t going to do anything creepy. I would, for example, probably trust jQuery, because they don’t (AFAIK) have a history of being creepy. Do we have a reason to trust Facebook to not be creepy? Absolutely not. So maybe don’t use their tracking library.

                                                                Above all that though, host your code on your own damn servers. There’s no good reason to give a library vendor (or an attacker with access to your library vendor’s web server) the technical ability to inject arbitrary code into your app just by changing a file on their end. This should be an obvious thing just from a reliability perspective too. Thanks to Hyrum’s law, every change is a potential breaking change, so it seems ridiculous to effectively push new versions of dependencies to customers with no testing.

                                                          1. 8

                                                            We did a Disaster Recovery test last night, successfully. Even though we always learn something new each time. We had a real disaster recovery scenario a couple of years ago, where one of the data centers where almost flooded. It was scary as hell.

                                                            People say that a backup which is not tested to be restorable is not a backup, a disaster recovery plan which is not tested, is not a disaster recovery plan.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Moonlander since a couple of months. Not 100% convinced yet but still giving it a chance. It is better than anything I’ve ever used before, just not perfect.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                Migrating away from lastpass to either bitwarden or pass. Will see which is easier to self host on a vps I have.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I’ve been using Bitwarden a long time and am VERY happy with it. I run it self hosted and only accessible from within my home network (I’m always on VPN home when I am out). I admit this is a bit more complex setup, but Bitwarden itself is great!