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    Speaking for myself, I’ve never been promoted or hired based on technical problem solving. It’s always been about being more impactful to the business by working on the human side. It took a while for me to get excited about that, as coding’s what’s drawn me to the job. I think it’s related to what the authors of Peopleware call “the high-tech illusion”.

    That’s based on a short commercial career of ~7 years, but it’s been consistent enough that that’s my mental model of providing value to startups nowadays (which tends to become self-fulfilling.)

    In startups, I’ve never worked with programmers considerably more senior than where I am now (the fact that someone inexperienced as myself gets job titles such as “senior engineer” and “tech lead analyst” disturbs me, but I brush most of it off to title inflation). I’ve always asked myself what kind of company hires programmers at the level the article describes, as I’d love to join such an organisation. Would be great to be able to focus more on the technical.

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      None of this problem solving is necessarily technical. Often it’s a range, from “deep technical problem” to “development process problem” to “organizational problem requiring negotiation”.

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        It’s always been about being more impactful to the business by working on the human side

        Can you please elaborate on the “ Human side “ ? Thanks.

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          “Human side” was a poor way to put it.

          My point is that getting better jobs correlates with providing better value to the company, and, even in so-called “tech companies”, the value that better technical solutions can provide is marginal. We as developers tend to focus on technical problems because those are to control and, frankly, more fun most of the time, but that’s not addressing the bottleneck.

          In contrast, there’s much lower-hanging fruit to be had by improving team productivity through better understanding of the model, better frameworks for collaboration, tighter feedback loops, higher team resilience, quality management, etc. Developing those skills has given me a much greater ROI. It tends to be the skills my team hires for, beyond entry-level positions.

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        I will complete a git tutorial and Coursera and follow it up with the git lesson on Software carpentrty. Expect to get a working knowledge of Git by Sunday.

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          Having an Emergency fund with nine month of expenses would be a good start. The rest can be figured out .

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            I use boostnote to keep track of ideas and also store key ideas from books that I have read.

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              Beautiful Visualisations here. I wonder if using non-smart phones can help in anyway.

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                According to the article the data comes from a company collecting precise movements using software slipped onto mobile phone apps. So maybe installing/using less apps helps somewhat…

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                  After reading this, I deleted half the apps from my phone and disabled location services for most of the ones that were left.

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                    I would assume that disabling location permission for apps would also be sufficient. I can understand why maps needs my location, but not much else.

                    That said, the article does say the weather channel was also at this, and I guess a lot of people would give this more trust as its a default app on ios.

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                      Yes and no.

                      The wifi MAC address method is also becoming quite prevalent. If your phone has wifi just enabled it can be pinged. [1]

                      Then over the cell network your signal can be triangulated.

                      1. https://techcrunch.com/2019/05/22/mind-the-privacy-gap/
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                        True, thats what skyhook does as well. Interestingly (and this might show a conflict of interest within Google) Android has started using random mac’s for wifi. https://source.android.com/devices/tech/connect/wifi-mac-randomization

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                        the weather channel was also at this, and I guess a lot of people would give this more trust as its a default app on ios.

                        Is it? I know there’s a weather app by default, but I thought the Weather Channel app was a separate download (not a regular iOS user here). I uninstalled The Weather Channel on my Android device after they were outed as scraping contacts and selling that off. No reason to install anything of theirs after that and now this as well.

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                    (https://ofdollarsanddata.com/climbing-the-wealth-ladder) and

                    (https://www.collaborativefund.com/blog/authors/morgan/).

                    Both are related to Finance and contain Interesting observations.

                    I just noted that you have tagged this under Science. I leave this answer as you have mentioned a tech blog

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                      Want : Clarity on good , practical Computer VIsion/ Deep Learning courses.

                      I am unable to figure out which courses are good and hence not able to decide which ones to buy amongst the Black Friday deals.

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                        I am a bit confused by this post because Vimium has nothing to do with data science…

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                          Agreed. I’m not a data scientist, nor somebody who does AI, but if I would expect the list to include programs such as:

                          • awk & sed
                          • jq
                          • xsv
                          • gnu parallel
                          • Excel or Google Sheets
                          • Python & numpy
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                            I am comfortable with the last two, but have not even heard of the first 4. I will look them up. Thanks

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                              Your list contains already some of the usual suspects. If you understand unix pipelines well, those can take you very far. Wikipedia does a good job explaining it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipeline_(Unix)

                              I use most of the tools in that list on a daily basis. The three first are godsends. I could not do my work without them anymore.

                              Additionally, I also use/depend on these:

                              An advice I would give is: read manpages. There is tons of information in classic manpages such as those of grep, wc, ls, screen, etc.

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                                I am not familiar with most of these tools. I looked them up. Will start grokking them soon. Thanks for your detailed reply.

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                            My apologies for the ambiguity. I just wanted to high-light that I am not from a conventional CS background and hence even basic tools are somewhat new to me. I have corrected the title and the content now.

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                            The question is still a bit too vague I’m afraid. What kinds of problems are you trying to solve? What does your day to day task queue look like?

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                              Sure. Currently, I am building a facial recognition system using existing Deep Learning methods.

                              Basically, I am trying to learn tools that would aid me to perform tasks in an optimal way. Ex: Browsing via vimium.