1. 5

    I am puzzled why these even exist. What is the point? To have the browser be an OS?

    1. 9

      Yes, the dream of a PWA revolution requires the browser to have access to everything like the underlying OS does but that will never happen because it’s too easy to make malicious PWAs when there’s no central store/authority to police them.

      I want freedom too, but the world is full of idiots who still click on “your computer is infected” popups and voluntarily install malware.

      1. 4

        They exist to allow web pages controlled and sand-boxed access to resources otherwise only available to black-box native apps which also happen to award Apple 30% of their revenue, so me personally, I’m taking that privacy argument with a grain of salt.

        1. 11

          Web apps are just as black-box as native apps. It’s not like minified JavaScript or WebAssemly is in any reasonable way comprehensible.

          1. 8

            I would somewhat agree if Apple was the only vendor who doesn’t support these APIs, but Mozilla agrees with Apple on this issue. That indicates that there’s some legitimacy to the privacy argument.

            1. 2

              The privacy reason seem not too opaque, as the standard way of identifying you is creating an identifier from your browser data. If you have some hardware attached and exposed, it makes identification more reliable, doesn’t it?

              1. 2

                Apple led the way early on in adding APIs to make web apps work like native mobile apps — viewports and scrolling and gesture recognition — and allowing web apps to be added as icons to the home screen.

                1. 2

                  Originally iPhones apps were supposed to be written in html/js only, but then the app store model became a cash cow and that entire idea went down the drain in favor of letting people sharecrop on their platform.

                  1. 9

                    I mean, too, the iOS native ecosystem is much, much, much richer and produces much better applications than even the modern web. So, maybe it’s more complicated?

                    1. 1

                      Agreed. I think that native apps were the plan all along; progressive-ish web app support was just a stop-gap measure until Apple finalized developer tooling. Also, given that most popular apps (not games) are free and lack in-app purchases, odds are that the App Store isn’t quite as huge of a cash cow as it is made out to be. The current top 10 free apps are TikTok, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Facebook Messenger, Snapchat, Cash App, Zoom, Netflix, and Google Maps. The first six make money through advertisements. Cash App (Square) uses transaction fees and charges merchants to accept money with it. Zoom makes money from paid customers. Netflix used to give Apple money but has since required that subscriptions be started from the web (if I remember correctly). Google Maps is free and ad-supported.

              2. 1

                The browser already is an OS. The point of these is to have it be a more capable and competitive OS. Just so happens that at present there’s only one player who really wants that… but they’re a big one, and can throw their weight around.

              1. 11

                Wow, tough crowd. They didn’t seem to get it at all.

                Then again it felt like Morozov was speaking at the lion’s den.

                1. 13

                  I’ve noticed, since about 2007, that people from the Former Soviet Union (including East Germany) have always had a lot more insight into what is going on with modern techno-corporate capitalism than anyone else.

                  The ways in which the corporate elites abuse their power and access are surprising to people who grew up in the suburbs and can believe that “meritocracy” exists in Silicon Valley. They’re not surprising at all to people who experienced the collapse of the Soviet experiment.

                  1. 5

                    The mythology of the end of history is an extraordinarily powerful dream; teleological fairy tales are much easier to swallow when crafted to elevate your particular circumstance to something more than the contingent.

                    1. 3

                      East Germans would object to GDR being called a part of USSR. Warsaw Pact, please.

                      It’s quite surprising, actually, that there aren’t more “dissidents” in the US who point out the downsides of the capitalist pseudo-“meritocratic” system. Pre-collapse (1980s') USSR was full of people skeptical about the communist system. Why are there no counterparts in the States?

                      There are such people in Europe, though these days many of them seem to be as brainwashed by Putinist propaganda as Soviet dissidents were by Radio Freedom (see also my comment downthread). Which is quite understandable: it’s easier to recognize inaccurate information about your own society. So I can’t advocate for such mindset, but it does make me wonder why USA seems to have less “dissidents” questioning the basis of the system than even Putin’s Russia.

                      1. 1

                        East Germans would object to GDR being called a part of USSR. Warsaw Pact, please.

                        I apologize.

                        It’s quite surprising, actually, that there aren’t more “dissidents” in the US who point out the downsides of the capitalist pseudo-“meritocratic” system. Pre-collapse (1980s') USSR was full of people skeptical about the communist system. Why are there no counterparts in the States?

                        I think that the picture is changing in that direction. In the 1990s, saying that corporations were run by idiots or psychopaths put you in the “crazy far left” bucket and branded you a hater or a loser. In 2016, people generally agree (on left and right) that our corporate elite is detrimental; we just haven’t figured out what to do about it. The irony is that both the right-wing movements and the left-wing movements hate “the corporate elite”– it’s just that the right-wing populists think that the corporate elite is liberal.

                        60-70 percent of the people are against the corporate system. The problem is that the corporate system is great at divide-and-conquer shenanigans. It doesn’t help that this country still has a lot of racism and sexism– although not as much as it once did.

                        Further, I think there’s a lack of a competing system. In East Germany, you could see that an established system, capitalism, was better in many ways than authoritarian socialism. The alternative already existed.

                        In our case, the problem isn’t capitalism but corporate capitalism, which is (as noted) an adverse synthesis between capitalism and socialism… but there isn’t an obvious alternative out there. In the ideological framework we have, the problem is more complicated and therefore it’s not clear what the solution should be.

                        In 2005, a lot of us were saying that it was time to be “more like Europe”, because they’d clearly figured out healthcare and because Europeans were better educated and had 20-35 days of vacation per year. However, over the past few years, Europe has been in its own kind of mess (economic stagnation, xenophobic/right-wing backlash, lack of innovation, high unemployment, low wages for technology people) and so it’s hard to call “more like Europe” the obvious right answer. The challenge that we’re facing (automation and the first signs of a need to move to a post-job society) is like nothing we’ve encountered yet.

                      2. 1

                        What a roundabout way to say that dogmatic application of the central planning sucked. :-)

                        1. 15

                          There’s more to it, though.

                          I tend to think of corporate capitalism as an adverse synthesis. A well-connected social elite (“the 1 percent”) has built up a system that combines the best of two systems (socialism and capitalism) for them and leaves the downsides to the rest. For example, when we fly on airlines, we get the service that we’d expect in the Soviet Union from bored bureaucrats, but we get the price volatility/uncertainty (“our algorithm detected a high need to fly, so your fare goes up 5x”) of capitalism.

                          This adverse synthesis also makes it easy for the elite to divide the poors along faux-ideological lines. Hence, half of the proles get caught up in xenophobic rage-gasms against a perceived liberal “cultural elite”, and this only strengthens the economic elite that is screwing these people (and everyone else) over.

                          I don’t actually think that central planning is inherently bad. You need a market economy and you need the right for private business to compete with the government, to keep the latter in check, but there are a lot of problems that are best solved by central planning: public infrastructure, healthcare, and research funding, for just a few examples.

                          1. 14

                            A former-East-German friend of mine likes to say that East Germans are twice burned: the Soviet bloc turned out to be worse than they thought, and the American bloc turned out to be worse than they thought, too. He honestly is more surprised about the latter, which leads to a certain critical view of modern capitalism for an odd variety of reasons.

                            Most critical-thinking people in East Germany assumed the official newspapers were greatly exaggerating when they criticized the West, of course, so it was no surprise when some criticisms turned out to be false. But what surprised quite a few dissidents is that some of the criticisms were true! For example, my friend really believed that the East German propaganda about millions of people in the USA not being able to see doctors was just made up, or at best exaggerating a handful of edge cases. The same with propaganda about large homeless populations in the USA. The assumption he had was that: 1) it is probably true that inequality is much higher in the USA, but 2) since the capitalist system is overall so much more prosperous than the state-socialist one, even poor people in the USA are probably prosperous in relative terms, more like working-class people in the GDR. So it was an actual surprise to find that large numbers of Americans were much poorer than he had assumed, which has led him to be much more critical of the capitalist system than he would have ever expected when he was an East German dissident. It’s an odd situation because he does not think East Germany was run well either, so he is left in the situation of: that was bad, and this here, is also bad.

                            1. 4

                              I was moved from the Soviet Union to “the West” at the age of 14, and yes, it surprised me how much of Soviet anti-capitalist propaganda was actually true (roughly the same percentage as in western anti-Soviet propaganda, I would say). And this seems to be the experience of many others who made the same journey around the same age without really being asked if they wanted it.

                              But what surprises me even more are former Soviet dissidents who emigrated to the USA and became hardcore libertarian gun-totting American patriots. They resisted Soviet propaganda quite well and then swallowed western propaganda hook, line and sinker.

                              East Germans generally are more skeptical, as you describe. Perhaps it’s because they had a fully functional western system thrust upon them (though, make no mistake, they were fighting for it), like I have, while Soviet dissident emigrants joined it out of their own free will and are reluctant to admit their mistakes.

                              1. 3

                                I watched a 2015/6-era Chinese propaganda video and, in that particular one, what was notable was that, while it was misleading, there weren’t any lies. About half of it focused on our healthcare/insurance system, which doesn’t need to be exaggerated to make a case against us, and on the racial tensions of the past few years. It seems that, at least these days, the most lasting propaganda isn’t lies (although fake news, which usually is lies, might argue against that) so much as misleading anecdotes that might have you thinking, say, that every American is a gun freak or that fatal police brutality is a common occurrence, when neither is true. For example, there was an interview with a computer programmer who’d become homeless and was begging for change on Michigan Avenue. I do know people who’ve had that career evolution, but it’s (perhaps obviously) very rare.

                            2. 8

                              Oh yeah, it merges two systems. It’s called a plutonomy. Let Citigroups advisors to the elite investors explain it all to you in memos you weren’t meant to see:

                              https://politicalgates.blogspot.com/2011/12/citigroup-plutonomy-memos-two-bombshell.html

                        2. 3

                          The guy is very intelligent and I have to agree with him. The problem is with the individualism. And frankly, advocating commons to rich people is always hard.

                        1. 4

                          I don’t want to watch a video right now, so I found this review of his 2013 book with a similar subtitle. Maybe someone else in my situation can be helped by it:

                          http://mobile.nytimes.com/2013/05/19/books/review/to-save-everything-click-here-by-evgeny-morozov.html

                          If you did see the clip, is the speech anything like what the book seems to be like?

                          1. 2

                            I haven’t read the book but read the review and watched the video. The review seems to focus on the author’s conclusions in his book but doesn’t tell us how he arrived at his conclusions, which is typically more interesting iMO for this sort of thing. Some of the themes are shared between the video and the review. However the main points presented in the video don’t appear in the review, except in very oblique form.

                            1. 1

                              If you did see the clip, is the speech anything like what the book seems to be like?

                              Not sure how to compare. Please watch the video.

                              1. 1

                                Thanks. Unfortunately the video isn’t subtitled, and quite long, so it would be prohibitive for me to compare. It does look interesting and I’ll report back if I get anywhere in it.

                                1. 1

                                  I neither watched the video nor read that review. The book is good though, and people should read it.

                                1. 2

                                  Why not just ask people you know? The pros of this approach is you also get a thing to meet and talk about.

                                  1. 1

                                    When I can get the paper book, I buy and read it on paper. There’s a few good bookshops in my city where I usually go and browse, talk to people there etc. Same when traveling. I also have a Kindle for when I want something immediately and can’t get from a local bookshop.

                                    1. 5

                                      Paper. It’s way easier to skim that way. No battery to worry about, I can easily annotate the margins, and the bookmark system (slips of paper) does not frustrate me.

                                      For non-fiction, skimming is key. My to-read stack grows faster than I actually read the books, but I do at least skim every new book: reading the table of contents, flipping through the pages, looking at pictures/diagrams that catch my eye, and generally just getting a spatial feel for where things are in the book.

                                      At that point, even if I haven’t learned much information I at least have some meta-awareness of what’s in the book. I “know what I don’t know” so to speak.

                                      Skimming is very rewarding. If I was forced to read every book straight through I would probably read a lot less.

                                      1. 3

                                        You’re not really reading though. Maybe you’d be better off reading a lot less, and then reading about the books you want to be informed about. These days all these “skimmable” non-fiction books end up being written about on Medium by some dude pitching his soon to fail startup.

                                        1. 1

                                          I do get around to reading thoroughly eventually. For instance I’m about halfway through “The Empire of the Steppes: A History of Central Asia” and it’s absolutely engrossing. Even after passing through translation, the author’s style is way above par. Much better than I’d find on Medium, if I even found someone who cared to write about arcane subjects like kingdoms in the Tarim Basin.

                                          I think every book without a plot is skimmable. I’d skim fiction too if it didn’t ruin the story.

                                        2. 2

                                          You have a case of tl;dr my friend.

                                        1. 3

                                          This version of macOS 10.12 cannot be installed on [Macbook Pro, mid 2009]

                                          shakes fist

                                          I don’t see any technical reasons why it wouldn’t work.

                                          1. 3

                                            Ars Technica’s review couldn’t find any rational thing in common across the hardware they dropped. The most likely thing was simply that they’re making software support match the 7-year hardware support window,

                                            1. 2

                                              Quite often if it’s not a technical reason people will soon find workarounds to trick the installer into running.

                                              Edit: as an addendum to this even if there IS a technical reason, workarounds are sometimes found, I believe the 2006ish Mac Pros could be tricked to run Mavericks IF you upgraded the graphics card.

                                              Edit 2: http://dosdude1.com/sierrapatch.html

                                              1. 1

                                                Yep, there’s an active community of people who run OS X on unsupported Macs. AFAIK 2006 Mac Pros can run El Capitan and, I’m pretty certain, Sierra.

                                                It does get trickier with non-upgradeable hardware though - eg, older MacBooks and Mac Minis, which can experience graphics issues when newer releases are shoehorned in (primarily because Apple removes the drivers for that hardware and so drivers from older releases are hacked in).

                                              2. 2

                                                I’ll probably be staying where i’m at with my MBP 2008 for two more years until security updates stop coming. I guess the choice comes then as to what to do. Switch to xubuntu or try these workarounds people will come up with.

                                                1. 3

                                                  You must be really looking forward to the MBP refresh :)

                                                2. 2

                                                  Weird, considering that 2009 MacBooks and iMacs are still supported (and AFAICS both the 2009 MacBook and MacBook Pro have NVidia 9400M graphics). Sadly my mid-2007 MacBook Pro didn’t last long enough to make it onto the “unsupported” list - it was killed by the infamous NVidia GPU issue.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Sometimes it’s graphics; sometimes it’s CPU or chipset issues. Apple doesn’t do this purposefully to make people upgrade; they just make a cost/benefit analysis when a planned feature would cause some older machines to fall out of their support window.

                                                1. 23

                                                  As a scientist, I disagree with this on general principle. I think a technically focused community shouldn’t be afraid to have discussions about science as well as more focused technical topics.

                                                  That said, maybe lobsters really needs a “clickbait” flag option? We should be filtering out articles that are just press releases or are low on information.

                                                  1. 11

                                                    I don’t think the problem is “science”, but that it usually means pop-science.

                                                    1. 8

                                                      I agree that some way of signalling “Hey, this article is clickbait” would be nice–I currently use the spam tag for this purpose, and less often the off-topic flag. I currently also post in every thread I notice that I think fits this definition–and I’m sure that everyone is as sick of reading those posts as I am of making them. :(

                                                      To elaborate on my position with science:

                                                      The first big problem is that we have is that the tag lends itself to popsci submissions, which in turn are churned out by the hundreds by all kinds of businesses and institutions who use that to get marketing views (this is literally Popular Science magazine’s reason to exist). There is big money in saturating the airwaves with popsci nerd bait, and allowing those submissions here tends to invite that sort of saturation.

                                                      The next big problem is that the science tag is just not very specific. Compare:

                                                      • Javascript–is the story about the Javascript programming debacle^Wlanguage?
                                                      • debugging–is the story about figuring out how a system failed?
                                                      • software–is the story about the release of a software package?
                                                      • cogsci–is the story about cognition or modeling cognition?

                                                      Meanwhile, for the science tag, we have:

                                                      • Is the story…um…space? Animals? Rocks?
                                                      • …maybe electronics?
                                                      • …physics, that’s a big one with the kid’s these days?
                                                      • …or wait, academia itself?
                                                      • …maybe health?

                                                      ~

                                                      The obvious answer is “Well, let’s add tags for subareas of science, and then people can filter what they want”. The reason the obvious answer is incorrect is that it results in:

                                                      • the creation of a bajillion tags when people can barely manage to properly use the ones we do have.
                                                      • the balkanization of the community into different filter bubble that are completely disjoint (e.g., we’re all basically developers right now, but in the future one could imagine biologists without any interaction with the rest of the community).
                                                      • the continual broadening of what sorts of submissions kinda fit, and hence the regression to the mean of submission quality and topicality.

                                                      ~

                                                      That’s why I brought the retirement of the science tag up, not only because it specifically is a source of trouble, but because it exposes some existential questions about the culture of Lobsters and how focuses we want to be as a community.

                                                    1. 4

                                                      Bringing up a new server for The Last Outpost MUD.

                                                      Best parts: first server with no moving parts; super low power consumption; tiny size Intel NUC form factor; its Linux!

                                                      Worst parts: fighting with Systemd; arguing with NetworkManager; the unpredictable “predictable interface names”; freshening up 8 year old config files.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        telnet'ed in. who. Shocked to see another player. It’s great to know MUDs are still alive!

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Well come on in and play for a while! We’re always looking for more people to join in the adventure. MUD’s are a lot like Pac-Man. They aren’t nearly as crazy popular as they were when they first came out, but there are still some out there, they are still fun to play, and if you’ve never tried one, you are kind of missing out.

                                                          LO’s been online with players for 25 years. That alone makes it worth a look. :)

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I still telnet into jedimud for that nostalgia hit

                                                        1. 3

                                                          Going through the Coursera Algorithm Design course and reading Kleinberg/Tardos. I’m about halfway through. Doing the programming assignments in Rust to get better at it.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Partially Examined Life - A few guys go over a philosophy reading, and talk about it without assuming the listeners have previous knowledge. It’s especially interesting if you’re curious about a philosopher or topic, but not sure whether you should dig into the primary text etc.

                                                            I usually just download an episode and play it with the default music player. I used overcast when I was on iOS.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              If you like philosophy, I also recomend these two podcasts:

                                                            1. 26

                                                              The assumption that people only use Linux as a challenge is wrong, and makes the author appear incredibly clueless and out of touch.

                                                              It’s so ridiculously wrong that, I’m not wasting my time with the rest of the article.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                You won’t be missing anything.

                                                              1. 48

                                                                I have met many programmers that don’t like to code in their spare time, and that has reliably revealed them to be sub-par developers.

                                                                I loathe this attitude and find it absurd. Imagine saying the same thing about aerospace engineers, or physicians.

                                                                If you wanted to say something like “the traits that make a good developer include a boundless intellectual curiosity, and this can manifest itself in coding as a pastime or any number of other active learning hobbies” or something that’s fine, but please stop demanding that we all work outside of work.

                                                                1. 25

                                                                  Yeah, it’s the same nonsense that says every developer needs to have an active GitHub (on which your abilities will also, of course, be judged). Some people (like me) like to program in their spare time, and do have an active GitHub. But this says nothing at all about how good you are at programming. A very good friend and coworker of mine is a much better programmer than me (we’ll often get to the same code, but he does it a lot quicker and easier than I do). He has a GitHub, but there’s barely anything on it, and he doesn’t often program in his spare time. You know why? He’s married, and has two young children that require a lot of his time and attention. If he were judged solely on his GitHub with the mindset mentioned above, you may think he’s a terrible developer not worth your time to hire, and thereby miss out on a really skilled and talented person.

                                                                  1. 16

                                                                    It’s another sorting mechanism by which groupthink is enforced. It’s “culture fit” nonsense, no more no less, and not in any predicative of any actual ability to do the work required, unless that work is furthering the given culture.

                                                                    1. 9

                                                                      While I agree with your premise, I think of it a little bit more softly: nobody really knows precisely what makes for successful workers of various kinds, so people tend to select for “similar to myself”. When those actually-squishy, please-more-people-like-me criteria are treated as objective, that’s a really unpleasant cultural complex.

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        It’s not predicative but it is predictive! The set of people interested in programming in their free time is better on average than the set that isn’t. For starters because they do more of it, also because they’re more engaged when they do it.

                                                                        1. 8

                                                                          If we refine this to “the set of people calling themselves programmers who are interested in programming in their free time”, etc, then I don’t think that’s true. I think this is a fair refinement, since 99% of the population can’t program, so your assertion is then true but not for the reasons stated.

                                                                          I think that the set of programmers who program in their free time is going to have a higher percentage of people who can at least write code that roughly works, simply because they’ve got more practice. There will be many more programmers in the latter set and some of them will produce a far higher quality of code than the median in the first set. I state this because many of the people in the first set are younger and less experienced programmers, not yet with families, who may be brilliant technically but haven’t yet learnt enough about maintainability or robustness not just against external vagaries but against less skilled programmers making unwise changes and catching them early.

                                                                          So “programs in their spare time” is a filter which will reject many people you want, but those who do get through will at least meet a certain minimum bar. If you’re not prepared to put the time in at recruitment to test beyond that, then you’ll get a monoculture and it may work for you. You can win in business/recruiting with this strategy. That doesn’t mean it’s wise.

                                                                          This then leads into broader issues of what should make up a team.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            This is an important part of the interviewing equation too: unless you really know what you need quite exactly, you’re using tests that are inexact: tests for things that correlate with or are proxies for the really desired quality/skill/capability. And when you find a good candidate, then you hope(!) that the correlation holds.

                                                                            I think that inability to accurately define the set of needed capabilities and unwillingness to train people of evident aptitude are the two cardinal sins for those who “can’t hire enough qualified people!!!!”; their punishment is they have to struggle on, somehow, staffing up with a subset of the people who could do the work.

                                                                        2. 5

                                                                          Exactly - in this and so many ways, everyone is different. There have been times when I have coded quite a bit outside of work, however for me this has often corresponded to my doing a job with relatively limited intellectual stimulation or new learning. I find myself now learning several exciting new technologies at my job and working in a relatively fast-paced environment where I am learning and being productive most of the day, most days. I don’t have a whole lot of mental energy left after a fully realized workday to spend hobby coding, but I am the best at my job that I’ve ever been.

                                                                        3. 7

                                                                          Agreed. I used to spend a lot more free time on programming-related hobbies. Then I had kids. If anything, my rate of programming self-improvement has gone up with less time spent on it, because I focus only on the most valuable things, not every shiny new toy that comes along.

                                                                          Of course, I also view it as part of my job’s responsibilities to explore different programming approaches as appropriate, so I get a decent bit of exploration built into my workday.

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            “the traits that make a good developer include a boundless intellectual curiosity, and this can manifest itself in coding as a pastime or any number of other active learning hobbies”

                                                                            That’s a good way to put it. Similarly, when hiring technicians for our optical lab I have found asking if they change their own oil in their car has correlated with good fits for the job. It’s not that I wouldn’t hire someone who didn’t, it’s just that doing that lines up with some of the things that made someone excel at that roll: hard working, mechanically inclined, and good with their hands.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              When I hire people I ask them if they can do a switch hardflip. It’s not a dealbreaker but it definitely shows technical ability.

                                                                            2. 1

                                                                              Learning is self-reinforcing. Spending offhours learning reinforces your on hours learning. This advantage accumulates over time, it becomes obvious over time.

                                                                            1. 12

                                                                              History, lifting, shooting, black metal, hugging my dogs. Lately…Overwatch. D.Va is Queen of all.

                                                                              Just finished watching the Game of Thrones season finale, applied a type inference hack someone from Slack suggested so that I could do this in Haskell with good type inference:

                                                                              Prelude> 1 year
                                                                              31557600s
                                                                              Prelude> 1.5 years
                                                                              47336400s
                                                                              

                                                                              I’m still trying to wrap up the damn book.

                                                                              1. 9

                                                                                I just love Overwatch, though I’m really bad at it. I suggest we make Lobsters Overwatch team. :P

                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  I’m down, even if it’s just for rando pubbing. Contact details in my post later on in the thread.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    Count me in!

                                                                                  2. 3

                                                                                    Zenyatta is my jam,

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      I’m guessing this hack is not that difficult to do. Where to read more about it?

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        It’s not hard, but the trick for making it work with good inference was a little obscure.

                                                                                        https://github.com/bitemyapp/buttress/blob/master/src/Buttress/Time.hs#L42-L66

                                                                                      2. 1

                                                                                        Are there bands you would recommend?

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            Good stuff, +1 for mentioning Mgła, definately will check out the rest. I would also mention Mayhem, Gorgoroth, Immortal, Varathron, Satyricon, Marduk from bigger names, or Dødsengel, Taake, Ljå, Drudkh, Lurker of Chalice, Funeral Mist, Nattefrost, Arx Atrata, from smaller ones (kvlt-ness is mixed-up). Also check out the side project of Gorgoroth’s Ghaal – Wardruna, for me it was a revelation :) Black metal ist krieg!

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              From the ones you mentioned, I would particularly highlight Gorgoroth and Drudkh. Their omission was a mistake.

                                                                                            2. 1

                                                                                              Thanks! From Mgła onwards everything sounds really good. It’ll take some time to dig in but the obvious standouts for me are The Great Old Ones and Harakiri for the Sky. Spectral Lore is also very interesting.

                                                                                        1. 20

                                                                                          I’m not sure if it’s lost on the authors or maybe that’s the point, but doing this would be the hipster thing to do in 2016.

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            Yeah, some of us have been doing this for decades though, already, so: not really, not hipster, no ..

                                                                                            1. 12

                                                                                              Yes, just like some people have been riding fixies and growing mustaches for decades. :-)

                                                                                              1. 9

                                                                                                So… You were doing it before it was cool?

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  No, before there were hipsters.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    You, Trevor, are the proto-hipster.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              HOME I’ve been asked to potentially start doing some “after-hours” contracting work. This is my first time getting into this and I’m a little worried. Questions like, “how much am I worth per hour?” are nagging me and I don’t really know how to figure that out.

                                                                                              WORK Nothing exciting. I’ve spent the past couple of days working on a Cisco ASA. I really have very little networking experience so it’s a lot of learning the hard way.

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                The usual “consultant” rate is thrice your salary rate.

                                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                                  Setting your rates takes a bit of trial and error. Since you’re doing it in your spare time I would go for a higher rate unless you really need the extra cash.

                                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                                  Beograd, Serbia.

                                                                                                  1. 6

                                                                                                    The bokeh looks terrible. Oops, sorry did I say that out loud? No matter, this is not a photography forum.

                                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                                      LOL.

                                                                                                      It does look awful. Hopefully this isn’t a place where that would start an argument.

                                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                                        Aw, man! Now I can’t unsee it…

                                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                                          I actually thought it was a post effect favored by the photographer. Then I decided these were how the actual photos look like.

                                                                                                          I’m quite ambivalent about these stealth advertisements for gear. It’s come to research - genomics is awash with it - practitioners are encouraged to tout the companies and tools they use and it has a more sleazy feel to it compared to private conversations amongst people where you say “Well, I really like tool X because of this and this and this”.

                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                            What makes you say this was a stealth advertisement? Do you think he’s lying about purchasing the camera on his own?

                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                              I’m not thinking in terms of a paid advertisement, but, you will note, there are as many pictures of the camera as there are taken by it.

                                                                                                              It could be all innocent - this may be a person prone to falling in love with gear and a natural fan of a brand, but I find it hard to distinguish the innocent kind of brand loyalty with the sponsored or supported kind because companies have gotten so good at this “viral marketing” thing.

                                                                                                              In either case, neither type of writeup is to be trusted too much because of their lack of objectivity.

                                                                                                              1. 0

                                                                                                                I’m with you. This reads exactly like a promotional essay and not like a genuine story. So yes, I think this is an ad indeed.

                                                                                                            2. 1

                                                                                                              This is almost certainly not a stealth advertisement. He’s changed many cameras and written about them in similar fashion.

                                                                                                          2. 2

                                                                                                            I like it. It has character. All those shiny L lens don’t. It’s what made me go back to analog in the first place.

                                                                                                            On the other hand, $4,000 is a bit more than my 15+ film cameras (ranging from cheap point and shoots like the L35AF to MFs like the RZ67). And I have absolutely no intention of buying a digital Leica.

                                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                                              Could that be at all attributed to the filter he is using? Near the end of the article he talks about using a particular filter and how he never put on the lens cap/cover, I assume because the filter was cheap and easily replaceable, and instead just wrapped the camera in a rag or towel or something when he wasn’t using it.

                                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                                              This is programmer heavy newsboard so replies will skew towards a computer based solution(ie use org-mode).

                                                                                                              I use notebooks and pocketbooks to have something with me at all times. At my desk I have a muji legal pad for rough todoing and sketching. For anything I would really like to keep, I write it as a text file. I have folders like diary, bookreviews, etc. They are mostly markdown files but who cares really. The file names are either dates, topics or both.

                                                                                                              Re: notebook choice. Moleskines are fine. I may slightly prefer muji ones because I like how they look but unless you are a fountain pen nerd(I used to be) they all work pretty well. Pilot G2 pens are genius.

                                                                                                              What I wish for is some kind of system for taking notes of stuff that I read. I’d really like to have an organized reading journal but haven’t found anything that I could stick with.