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    Does anyone know if it is possible to permanently disable hyperthreading on recent MacBook Pros without using XCode? (I think some automated software hack at startup is good enough for me)

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      CPUSetter looks like it should be able to do it.

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      Annoyingly, the redirects to GitHub are broken. Source code can be found here. I’ve emailed Peter Norvig (!) to let him know.

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        This is fantastic, so much great content. Appreciate the work and effort you put into this!

        P.S.: Is there an RSS feed for the Planet?

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          There is - viewing the source will give the URL, but otherwise it’s https://crustaceans.hmmz.org/rss20.xml.

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          Thanks - I was going to suggest doing something similar but didn’t get around to even making a suggestion :( Perhaps it can be made “official” and we could have a planet.lobste.rs?

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            I think there may be room for it! Although I note Planet itself is starting to show its age quite badly. Still hard to beat the simplicity, and with a little theming and e.g. setting a max length on the articles, things might start to look very nice.

            Can’t hate on Planet too much, I was setting this up for private use before I realized it might be worth sharing. The fact Planet is still a go-to RSS reader is quite impressive given its vintage!

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              Good point about the age of Planet - I’ve not looked around seriously for a replacement myself but a few of the alternatives are also a bit long in the tooth. Moonmoon looks to be maintained, although it’s written in PHP rather than Python.

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            I didn’t know what was Gopher before and still not sure what it is (will read more on that). I find Lobster already a pretty good interface without much distraction since it’s mostly text, so I don’t know what I would really use it for. What would be the use of this over lobster?

            Nice work and it’s loads really fast.

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              Gopher is an old protocol, I mean it predates the world wide web so it’s not about making an alternative UI to lobste.rs on http:// but on gopher:// for people who like to live in a plain-text world. See https://gopher.floodgap.com/overbite/relevance.html for more informations on gopher.

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                live in a plain-text world

                Except that gopher doesn’t guarantee plain-text (in practise any file type can be served). IIRC the main advantage of Gopher is that it has a standard format for navigation.

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                  Interestingly enough, Gopher and the web are roughly the same age - Gopher was publicly released in 1991, the same year as Tim Berners-Lee’s original announcement to alt.hypertext.

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                I am amazed that mutt is still alive and kicking. Fond memories of another Internet

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                  It’s very much alive and kicking - there’s even NeoMutt, a fork with added features. As someone who’s used Mutt/NeoMutt almost every day for 20+ years, it’s still very much useable today. Yes, HTML email does make things a bit painful, but there are workarounds.

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                    I’m using a stripped down version of elinks to do HTML -> plaintext conversions, both for mail and some other projects. w3m is also popular for this task.

                    Do you have other solutions you’d like to share?

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                      I’m using pretty much the same, albeit with w3m. I use a modified version of view_attachment.sh to handle attachments (grabbed from The Homely Mutt - there are plenty of other great tips in that article).

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                        Thanks. I’m working on a bidirectional mail gateway which does Unicode/MIME/RFC-5322/RFC-6854 <—> ASCII-ANSI-X3.4-1986/RFC-822 conversions.

                        Converting MIME/Base64 encoded parts into to UUENCODE and back is straightforward (and lossless).

                        The lossy transliteration of Unicode characters into plaintext equivalents is less straightforward and there is a wealth of prior art.

                        The task of ceating a usable presentation of modern HTML mail as plaint text, however, is more of an art than a science.

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                        FWIW urlscan is another useful tool https://github.com/firecat53/urlscan

                        In mutt I bind this to C-b so I can quickly open some link in my browser

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                      I’m actually still an elm user, myself.

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                        I also still use it. Works great, no nonsense. Sure, when I want to see an image I have to scp it to my local system, but hey :)

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                        This needs (2013) in the title

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                          The last update was in May of this year though:

                          Last edited Mon May 7 16:24:22 2018

                          That said, changes were minor.

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                            From the rules:

                            When the story being submitted is more than a year or so old, please add the year the story was written to the post title in parentheses.

                            Written ≠ had one word changed.

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                          All of my non-macOS systems still have /usr as a separate filesystem, even Linux systems that use systemd. I can (grudgingly) accept the argument being made, but the benefits far outweigh any issues for me (particularly in this day and age when systems are typically build from templates). Benefits including being able to mount /usr read only, ensuring the root fileystem doesn’t run out of space, being able to snapshot /usr independently of /, etc.

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                            I have always thought that Herbert Schildt’s C books contained more mistakes than any other C books out there.

                            Clive Feather’s ‘famous’ review and a review of a later book by seebs (of obfuscated fame): C: The complete nonsense

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                              Indeed, Schildt’s C books are quite widely maligned. Unfortunately I read them when I was at school, keen to learn C - I didn’t know any better at the time (this was in the days when the web had only just been invented and hadn’t left CERN yet). Herb Schildt, Ray Duncan, Charles Petzold (Windows logo tattoo and all) and Michael Abrash were the programming heroes of my youth.

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                              The first time I read your sample README, for some reason I thought I had to install the template using npm :)

                              Download & Installation

                              $ npm i boilerplate-readme-template

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                                Ha ha we are super addicted to console tools that we forget that we can simply download the project or copy paste it :)

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                                Rather scarily, I can remember reading that page for the first time at around that time (roughly when I first installed OpenBSD, version 2.1).

                                I thought the Last-Modified header may give the last update time but sadly not: Last-Modified: Wed, 04 Aug 2010 23:38:35 GMT.

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                                  I’ll always have a soft spot for IRIX and SGI hardware. I have an R5K Indy sitting in my garage and still lament trading my R10K O2 for a Sun Ultra 10. One day when I have more tuits and budget for vintage computers I’d love to get another high end O2 (a few months ago I almost bought a Fuel but couldn’t quite justify the expense).

                                  And on the subject of SGI sites, here’s hoping Nekochan does return…

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                                    And, of course, this means Java 9 is already end of life. No more updates. Not even security updates.

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                                      Wow, I didn’t realise this. I can see Oracle has documented it though. And Java 10 (18.3) is only supported until September 2018:

                                      ** Java SE 9 will be a short term release, and users should immediately transition to the next release (18.3) when available.

                                      *** Oracle has proposed a new version scheme for Oracle based builds (YY.M) starting in March, 2018. Java SE 10 (18.3) will be a short term release and users should transition to the next release when available.

                                      1. 1

                                        Ah, thanks - the joys of different URLs :(

                                        Deleting my post.

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                                        There’s a summary of this post, along with some commentary, here.

                                        1. 2

                                          Hey, just wanted to recommend You Need A Budget - I switched to it from MoneyWell when I made the same jump as you! Been happy so far!

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                                            Thanks for the suggestion. Glad it works for you, a friend of mine recommended it to me this morning too. I do believe it meets my desire for envelope budgeting but I don’t like the idea of handling all my financial data to a web app. I’m not worried about them stealing my money, moreso I just don’t like them having the data and what they’ll do with it. Such as this from the terms of service:

                                            We may disclose aggregated information about our users, and information that does not identify any individual, without restriction.

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                                              That’s fair enough. I think credit card companies and banks do the same though, no? I feel like that data is already (anonymously) exposed.

                                            2. 1

                                              I’ve recently started using YNAB and rather like it - it makes budgeting quite pleasant. My only criticism - they recently increased their price from $50 to $84/annum, which is a pretty huge increase (existing users are granfathered in to the old price “for now”).

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                                                That is pretty steep. I hadn’t thought about it because I’m on the student free plan for now…

                                            1. 1

                                              I’m not 100% happy with submitting this link, particularly as it links to leaked private emails, but the larger story of the updated FreeBSD Code of Conduct and the “backlash” in some sectors is an interesting one.

                                              If this link is inappropriate I will gladly remove it.

                                              1. 2

                                                Hanging out for x86-64. I don’t have old Alphas or VAXen lying around.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Alpha might (can’t overemphasize might) still be worth buying if you do concurrent or predictable software esp as hobby. Aside from relatively-simple RISC, the reason would be PALcode. That’s like doing microcode-level stuff with plain assembly language. One example is making arbitrary collections of instructions atomic by encoding them as a single instruction in PALcode. You also get the benefit they run while everything is still in cache and all. Intel added it to Itanium but I don’t know if it’s user-facing. For safety/security, you could do stuff with checks built-in or bring a HLL closer to the metal.

                                                  It was really neat. The boxes were also pretty reliable. Too bad they died off until we had just a few companies controlling a few ecosystems.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Don’t forget Itanium - you can pick up a pretty decent system on eBay for not much - look for an HP rx2600/2620 or the workstation version, the HP zx 6000.

                                                    Of course, there’s always SIMH - there are many SIMH/OpenVMS/VAX emulation guides online, eg, this one. OpenVMS support for the VAX ended with version 7.3 though.

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                                                    It is crazy and fascinating to me that VMS still has substantial enough install bases to justify roadmaps like this.

                                                    I really wish it was something you could actually download and play with. I’m not aware of any way to do that though.

                                                    EDIT: I stand corrected - if you hunt around a bit, there’s instructions: https://sourceforge.net/p/vms-ports/wiki/VMSInstallation/

                                                    1. 4

                                                      There’s the OpenVMS Hobbyist program - all you have to do is sign up as a member of your local DECUS chapter (free) and once you have a membership number, request a license. Licenses are only valid for a year but they’re renewable. They’ll also send you the (frequently rotated) login details for the ftp server so you can download the current releases for VAX, Alpha and Itanium.

                                                      I believe the program will be continued by VMS Software and will include the x86_64 port. That’s still some way away from GA though.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        HP killed it far as I can tell because they had two competing lines: VMS clusters and NonStop. Yet, they said before that it was one of most profitable divisions. Probably due to high prices plus them not investing much in maintenance. You’d expect a large customer base if it was a large profit center. On top of it, the customers themselves in surveys said it was rock-solid platform that never gave them headaches. Plenty loyalty.

                                                        So they killed it for who kniws what reason. This company revived it. It’s now one of most interesting legacy, porting efforts.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Reading this made me wonder if my year-and-a-bit old purchased-on-launch-day iPhone 7 was being subject to the throttling already. I did a quick test with Geekbench 4 and my scores were ~5% higher than their averages for that model. Wasn’t expecting that.