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    This seems like well-intentioned incompetence. The kind of people who blow through ~250GB a month are probably not the kind of people who still use an ISP email address, which is where they normally send these notices. A snail mail notice can take days, and I couldn’t tell you what Comcast’s number is if they called.

    Text messages are a better solution, and it’s probably what they’ll use when they realize how goofy this is.

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      Clacker News

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        I’m always weary of Gizmodo links, but from time to time they put together great articles. So many articles today are devoid of any in-depth fact checking. Good to see someone debunk the “Internet apocalypse”.

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          Somehow Prismatic only shows the articles from these 40-post-a-day sites that are interesting to me, like this one. It’s a nice companion to an RSS reader. It takes some time to train it on topics and sources, but it pays off.

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          I don’t know enough about this to say how good or bad the benchmarks are, but the test suites are on github, and they’re (apparently) open to feedback. Seemed like a good thing to submit here.

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            Gizmodo’s Sam Biddle did some journalism.

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              Just in time, I was thinking I was going to have to hit the fallout shelter what with all these nukes dropping.

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                I’m sure another apocalypse will be along shortly.

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              Conundrum time: The sort of people who use a site like Lobsters could get a lot out of a catch-all tag for marketing, promotion, advertising, etc. But that would draw spammers in droves if registrations were ever open to the public.

              The only solution that comes to mind is a way to set certain tags so that you need to meet some criteria before submitting articles in them. For example: If you’re under a certain karma, a user in the invite tree has to vouch for you.

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                I love the bullshit rhetoric from these ad execs:

                “This is damaging to consumer interest and will undermine the Internet.”

                “If Mozilla follows through on its plan … the disruption will disenfranchise every single Internet user,”

                “All of us will lose the freedom to choose our own online experiences; we will lose the opportunity to monitor and protect our privacy”

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                  I think they suffer from faulty metrics. I prefer targeted advertising to the broad ads that made me mute the TV for 18 minutes out of every hour in ancient times. Who wouldn’t? I’m sure that polls well in focus groups. But the cost is too high with the methods they use, and I would be surprised if people still wanted it after knowing the invasiveness of current methods.

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                    I wish they would just say the truth instead of having to make me infer it, all the IAB has pretty much said is “WHA WAH WAH We wont be able to profit off violating firefox users privacy by default, we will have to convince firefox users to let us violate their privacy and work for our money.”

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                      There’s a story making the rounds about some researchers making a network of hollow fiber optic cables. I think this is the technology behind it. This story has some detail and link to the new paper: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/151498-researchers-create-fiber-network-that-operates-at-99-7-speed-of-light-smashes-speed-and-latency-records

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                          This sums up why I thought long and hard about suggesting a game-related tag. It’s easy for it to slide out of control from the First Person Scholars and Bit Creatures of the world to the Kotakus and IGNs. There’s nothing wrong with pop culture sites, but there’s only a handful of them, and you can already aggregate them in a million ways.

                          I think the public invite chain helps avoid a race to the lowest common denominator. Let’s say one person I invited, the EiC of a game criticism blog I work with, invited someone who filled the front page with articles from Gawker.

                          Someone could, knowing we were responsible, send a polite private message to one of us asking that we teach the problem person to filter out only the best articles. The chain of accountability could break down as it grows, but it has a good chance of working out in the long term. It also seems to eliminate the need for passive-aggressive measures like domain blocks and invisible bans. Even Buzzfeed has a great article from time to time.

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                          As an active user, this makes me sad. However, I’m confident some other service (or many) will take over and provide the service I’m looking for. I currently user Reeder and am not sure what I’m going to use next. Any suggestions?

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                            Feedly dropped right into my workflow without skipping a beat. NewsBlur’s developer was still putting out fires when I tried it, but it usually shares the top two slots with Feedly in lists.

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                            This reminds me of when someone wrote an NES emulator in Visual Basic. Everyone said it couldn’t be done. Some even said it shouldn’t be done, as though it were some perversion of science.

                            But it worked perfectly, and the speedy emulation probably gave a lot of ideas to anyone who used Visual Basic.

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                              Typography: Design and typography can probably coexist for a long time, but it’s a huge topic all on its own, so a tag for it could invite a lot of interesting discussion.

                              Ludology: Discourages participation by the kind of people I can’t stand on most gaming forums, and doesn’t limit it to video games.

                              Art: There’s a lot to talk about in the development of digital art tools, and classic mediums have some discussion left in them.

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                                I added a “games” tag since most probably don’t know what ludology is (I’ve never even heard of it). I made the tag description “game design and study” so hopefully it can stay on-topic and not just “here’s a review of a new game”.

                                I added “art” too. I’ll leave typography out for now since it can probably be covered by design.

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                                  I seeded it with some links I’ve been holding on to.