Threads for monotux

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    I have a simple nomad setup for side projects.

    It’s really quite easy. I use the datacenter name “standalone” and put a consul instance and nomad instance on a box, then just put jobs on it. I use this for things like camera NVRs and “I need to run a few OCI containers, I guess”.

    Small, easy, fully in automation. And I don’t need to mess with k8s which the vast majority of people don’t need because most people are not google. Also nomad is just nice :)

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      I would love to read a more detailed write-up about this setup. Do you have anything you can refer me to?

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        I’ve got saltstack config I can throw into a comment, I can stand up a blog, and I can be reached on IRC (oftc and libera). What suits your fancy?

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          Did you ever post this anywhere? Just curious about nomad :-) “Vaelatern” Vaelatern@lobste.rs writes:

          I’ve got saltstack config I can throw into a comment, I can stand up a blog, and I can be reached on IRC (oftc and libera). What suits your fancy?

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            While I do enjoy reading a well written blog post I understand that it may not be worth the effort to you. I’m mostly curious about what the workflow itself looks like when you say you “need to run a few OCI containers”. This is coming from someone who isn’t experienced at all with Consul or Nomad, so maybe the thing for me would be to just read their documentation…

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        I use iCloud plus Kiliaro. But I should really, really setup something better as I’d prefer to have a local backup on my NAS, which in turn is backed up to Wasabi S3.

        My Lightroom library is backed up with NAS to block storage, and exported pictures synced with Dropbox for ease of use, sharing et c from my phone.

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          Yay! mosh is awesome, especially when you are on a terrible connection (like when riding a bus in rural areas with barely any cell coverage).

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            I’ve been using isc for a long time. I quite like my heirloom config but was just reading on what they suggest, Kea. They have a migration tool looks like. It emits JSON from your isc-dhcpd config. I’ll have to try this out.

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              We use kea at work at it’s mostly good. One of the good things is that you can store your configuration in database.

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                Another nice thing is it’s API. The configuration is just JSON, so it’s easy to deal with (like with Ansile) and so forth.

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              I would add r a d i c a l e to the list. It’s a very nice caldav compliant calendaring server. I replaced both Apple calendar and Google calendar with it.

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                +1 for radicale, it’s an excellent and lightweight program which I use for shared calendars. I keep meaning to try out its vcard support but haven’t gotten around to it. I combine it with vdirsyncer and khal (in its ikhal curses tui mode) on my laptop to keep things in sync.

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                  I’ve used carddav and caldav in radicale for several years, and it’s been great so far. Using with cell phones, macOS, Linux.

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                I’ve been using yarr which is in the same vein as miniflux, but even more minimalist. (Cons: it doesn’t work without Javascript) I’m now considering switching to miniflux due to how barebone it is.

                But if you’re looking for a barebone RSS reader, I think yarr should be considered.

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                  I’ve been looking for a replacement for rawdog (http://offog.org/code/rawdog/) since it’s Python 2 only. Yarr looks good in that it uses sqlite but the front-end looks overwrought. Miniflux looks good, too, but I don’t have any other need for a full-blown RDBMS so I’m hesitant to run Postgresql just for that app.

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                    You can probably run miniflux + postgresql on fly.io. 256 MB x 2 isn’t much, but more than enough in this case.

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                      Porting rawdog to Python3 honestly might not be too difficult. All the libs are there by now, and I’ve had quite good success rates with 2to3 and such.

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                        There seems to be an active fork here.

                        Last commit was a few days ago, so it’s more promising than doing it all yourself. :)

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                      Looks nice! Maybe I’ll give it a go. I love miniflux but there are a few small things that bother me. Does yarr work well on mobile layouts too?

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                        I don’t read RSS feeds on mobile. So I tried it for the first time on my phone browse, and it looks really nice and mobile-friendly. So to answer your question, yes it does work on mobile layouts too :)

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                          Thank you for checking! I tried to find docs but couldn’t find any.

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                      Current state: FUNDRAISING NOW

                      No thanks

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                        For a UChicago scav hunt one year, a friend of mine had to learn how to read QR codes. He told me that once you get over the first dozen humps, humans can translate them surprisingly quickly!

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                          I can believe that. I once sat down with a pile of mail and basically stared at it until I could read the USPS barcodes. Ever since then, it’s almost annoying how easily my brain processes it. But that itself isn’t far off from how people can learn to think in Morse, for example: brains are amazingly willing to “natively” handle binary codes, whether visually or aurally, as long as they’re trained in it. At this point in my life, that’s not a surprise anymore.

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                            That’s a nice piece, and one that shows how much OCaml has improved on that side. Thanks for sharing your experience!

                            I am really curious to see what OCaml will look like in 2 or 3 years, with OCaml 5 well established.

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                              Same here! :-) I’m really excited about OCaml 5 and what lies beyond it!

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                                I listened to this podcast and found it to be very interesting - What is an Operating System? (Signals and Threads) on OCaml and friends. Might be of interest to others in this thread, if a bit late!

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                                Thanks, now the prices for these machines will be even worse ;(

                                Very cool, tho!

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                                  I deny all responsibility. I just posted it, I didn’t do it. ;-)

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                                  I am migrating my website to fly.io and using caddy as webserver, nix is not currently in the architecture but will surely read this! Thanks :)

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                                    I recently moved my static websites to fly.io (shameless self-plug), but using gostatic for HTTP.

                                    The Dockerfile I used is this:

                                    FROM klakegg/hugo:0.101.0-ext-onbuild AS hugo
                                    FROM pierrezemb/gostatic
                                    COPY --from=hugo /target/ /srv/http/
                                    

                                    I…I really like the simplicity of this setup – don’t mind the entire chain of CI/CD required for it to work. :D

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                                      I have played with gostatic as well, it does the job but I wanted to play around Caddy just as a mental barrier to not end up using nginx :D

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                                        That was the exact reason I tested using Caddy, gostatic and (now) miniserve.

                                        I want to setup a redirect from non-www. to www. but couldn’t figure out the matching used in Caddy before my time was up (small children). So I just went to miniserve.

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                                          before my time was up (small children).

                                          Ahah, that’s way more powerful than my mental barrier against nginx :D Miniserve seems cool, basically a python -m http.server on steroids.

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                                    Is there any larger FOSS projects that is currently using Fossile for their version control? I’m curious to see how this works for external contributors.

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                                      The obvious FOSS project using Fossil is SQLite. And Fossil itself. :-)

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                                        TCL/TK uses Fossil too.

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                                          Perhaps not “larger,” but Retro Forth uses Fossil.

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                                            I’ve been happy with Fossil, but my workflow has me as a gatekeeper. I accept patches (and/or modified source files directly), review, revise if necessary, and then merge them. At this point I’m the only one with access to push changes to the primary repository.

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                                          I had briefly falled down a similar rabbit hole a while back with one of those Planck ortho-linear keyboards, but I returned to a regular keyboard layout for the following reasons:

                                          • I occasionally play video games, and need the odd key here and there
                                          • I have a hybrid work environment, sometimes from home, sometimes from the office, so I would need to either always carry my keyboard around, or have two.
                                          • This also makes it impossible (or at least confusing) to use the built-in laptop keyboard.

                                          But if it works for the OP, I’m all for it. Ergonomics are super important in this line of work.

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                                            I have the Planck EZ and more or less the same problems, but about 4 months in:

                                            -I have made custom layouts for games -I sometimes work away from my home office and at those times I do carry the Plack EZ along with all the wiring -In extremis I can always fall back to the computer’s builtin keyboard and it’s not all that jarring (for me, anyway).

                                            Also 4 months in I have observed that I am using the keyboard wrong and/or the columnar layout is not helping me much. My fingers travel a lot anyway. I think I must be using it “wrong”

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                                              Yeah, it’s not insurmountable, but I think I underplayed how much I play video games, and it’s not feasible to program a new layer every time you find a new game with slightly different keybindings, I find.

                                              As much as I like the whole QMK open firmware project (and it’s related projects), it’s not exactly a rapid process to change things around.

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                                                True. I don’t play a whole lot on the computer, I’m more of a console person (and will often prefer a controller even on computer). When I do play on the computer, games tend to have similar bindings by “genre”, more or less. If I wanted to play more using my Planck, I probably would have layers by genres.

                                            2. 3

                                              i have been alternating between a staggered-qwerty (laptop keyboard) and ortho-colemak (the ferricy), and i am comfortable with both now! i have been able to consistently hit ~90 WPM on both layouts, it takes me a few minutes of typing to “switch” my brain over from one to the other.

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                                                Nice overview. I’ve been rocking 42 keys for nearly a decade now and I’d never go back, but I really only have one layer I use regularly.

                                                One thing I’m curious about that the article didn’t mention: how long did it take you to get proficiency in this layout? (For me it took about 3 weeks to get fast on the Ergodox, and once I had that proficiency, bringing it down to 42 keys on the Atreus only took 2 weeks, but from what I hear about other people switching to the Atreus, 3-4 weeks is common.)

                                                1. 2

                                                  glad you liked it. big fan of the unibody-split design of the atreus.

                                                  the descent to 34 was gradual. i started out with a Lotus58, plucked out a few keys until i got to 48, 36 and finally 34. All in all, it took me around 3 months to go from a 60% to a 35%. That being said, I am not as fast as I was on staggered-qwerty yet. I am currently hovering at about 90 WPM on the ferricy, whereas I could hit upwards of 130 on qwerty. going from 36 to 34 was particularly tricky, every key is load-bearing at that point.

                                              2. 2

                                                I’ve been using non-standard layouts for 15+ years, and a mix of ortholinear and normal staggered keyboards for 5+ years. I can switch layouts mid-sentence and go between staggered and ortho layouts in a breeze as well (the only awkward part is to have two keebs on the same table), the entire typing should be in your muscle memory and not in your head. It can be done, without issue.

                                                And keyboards like these have nearly nothing to do with ergonomics. Keyboards are awkward and stupid to use for humans. :)

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                                                  And keyboards like these have nearly nothing to do with ergonomics. Keyboards are awkward and stupid to use for humans. :)

                                                  Do you think any writing/typing implement is ergonomic?

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                                                    The closest are probably Maltron, Kinesis Advantage, Dactyl and friends. And while I love using dvorak I don’t have any delusions that my layout of choice would improve ergonomics in any way (beyond placebo, which is powerful in itself).

                                                2. 2

                                                  I switched to ortholinear about 4-ish months ago. I swap back to a standard TKL board for gaming, though that’s partially because I have a tented split keyboard. At first I had a little trouble switching back and forth between ortholinear and staggered, but after the first maybe 2 weeks I don’t have much trouble switching back and forth.

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                                                    Ergonomics are super important in this line of work.

                                                    Agreed. And it’s great that there are so many keyboard options because it seems everyone needs something different. I love the Planck, despite its flaws. After trying a few different styles I settled on the Planck because I have small hands and the less distance my fingers have to travel the better.

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                                                    I’ve always resisted the urge of switching to a different layout than QWERTY in fear of not being able to use someone else’s keyboard. Given that I use my own setup most of the time, this fear is not really justified. But it’s kinda like buying insurance, for that one time when you really need it.

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                                                      I am in front of a lot of different systems throughout a given week, so switching away from QWERTY is a non-starter for me. The best I can go is a Microsoft Natural 3000 keyboard for my main systems. Been using those or the original Microsoft Natural since the 1990’s.


                                                      This is a really cool project, thank you for posting it! However:

                                                      escape is too crucial to put on a non-base layer, but at the same time, not as important to deserve a place on the base layer.

                                                      Not important! Heresy! (JK) I was obligated to say that as a decades-long vi/vim/neovim user. Very nice project, though, seriously.

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                                                        You won’t forget QWERTY if you switch to a new layout, don’t worry. Worst case is that you have to look down on the keycaps when typing…

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                                                          Yes, this is my experience as well, combined with the annoyance that the keys are all in non-sensical positions.

                                                          If I have to help a colleague who is on qwerty and it takes me too much time to type something out, I will ask them to type it out.

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                                                          I learned a new alpha layout at the same time as I was getting used to a small ergo keyboard (30 keys in my case). I continued using my regular row stagger keyboard during the day at work, but would practice on my new layout and keyboard at night. After a few weeks, I felt good enough to start using my new keyboard for work. It has been over a year since and I still use QWERTY on my laptops built in keyboard and my alt-layout on my ergo keyboard. Having the layouts tied to different physical key layouts has made it really easy to keep them straight in my head.

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                                                          If you want a similar tool that also supports asymmetric encryption (air gapped decryption keys), then please also give my one a try:

                                                          https://github.com/andrewchambers/bupstash

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                                                            Nice! A state of the art feature, as I understand it, is to permit multiple concurrent writers to the same archive. Does bupstash support this?

                                                            Duplicacy supports this via lock free techniques: https://github.com/gilbertchen/duplicacy/wiki/Lock-Free-Deduplication

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                                                              It supports multiple concurrent writers with no problem, the lock free removal is interested though - maybe something I can add.

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                                                                Out of curiosity, would such a change sidestep the issue in this issue from awhile back?

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                                                                  Probably not, however I am investigating ways to support filesystems that don’t support file locks. One example is how sqlite3 does it, with an option to use a fallback instead of a filesystem lock (like attempting to create a directory).

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                                                                    Ok thanks for the detail. I am really excited to see what you come up with. Bupstash looks absolutely amazing to me.

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                                                              Another alternative for asymmetric encryption is rdedup, but I haven’t found (or bothered writing myself) the tooling around it to make it a worthwhile backup solution for me.

                                                              I’m currently using restic on my file server, backuping to wasabi s3-compatible storage. Works great.

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                                                              I wish I had IPv6 so that could even see that.

                                                              Any year now, any year…

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                                                                I don’t really need one, but I really do want one.

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                                                                  Same here, I just suspect that it will be far too expensive to be reasonable for me.

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                                                                  Quite sad github still is not reachable through IPv6. Are they even trying?

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                                                                    I’m still waiting for IPv6 in any major ISP where I live, let alone anywhere I’ve ever lived. Oracle cloud only recently (and poorly unless you use their CentOS fork) added support for IPv6 to their cloud offering.

                                                                    But it’s almost silly that such a major service like Github still doesn’t support it.

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                                                                      ISPs are a mixed bag, even the same ISP in the same city. Tunnelbroker.net is where I get ipv6 where I need it and don’t have it.

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                                                                    I wrote this, and (as I heard on reddit) it is a bit pedantic, but I don’t think talking about developer multipliers is a helpful way to talk about skills. We can be more specific about people’s strengths and weaknesses and not pretend they always correlate with raw throughput under all conditions.

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                                                                      The 10X meme is both too extreme, by implying that Fabrice Bellard4 could kick out simple crud tasks at 10X the speed I do, and not extreme enough, suggesting that I could build ffmpeg and qemu the same as Fabrice if I was just given more time.

                                                                      I thought this was brilliant, but you ended the article abruptly after that and suggest we call them “experts” instead. Which is in my opinion, even worse.

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                                                                        I didn’t have the same response… The “10x dev” notion is harmful because the idea of being “10x productive” is not a parameter of an individual, but (maybe) of an individual in a context. I feel like the upshot of TFA is that we should call explicit attention to the context (“expert in video encoding”). If you did that, then (IMO) even the term “10x” isn’t as harmful (“10x CRUD developer” is not seen to be equivalent to “10x QEMU developer”)… Though I think the connotations of the word “expert” lead one to ask “expert in what?” more than you’d ask “10x in what?”.

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                                                                          Thanks, I mean I guess I felt like a had made my point but maybe I hadn’t?

                                                                          Happy to find some better terminology if you have ideas.

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                                                                            You did made your point very clearly. I was just eager to find better ways to phrase it. Like you promised in the beginning of the article.

                                                                            I think “expert” suffers from same inacuracy as is asserts or at least suggests abnormally high abilities.

                                                                            As others mention, it is a combination of a skilled person, placed in the right job and in optimal conditions. This is not straight forward to communicate.

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                                                                              I think “expert” suffers from same inacuracy as is asserts or at least suggests abnormally high abilities.

                                                                              To me, an expert has a lot of experience and (through that), hard to come by knowledge. Doesn’t necessarily mean they’re more efficient/faster than a non-expert.

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                                                                          I often feel weird when I read posts like this because of the Streisand Effect. Telling people not to think of something in a particular way often merely perpetuates it. An alternative would be to find a completely different framing and push it without mentioning the one you don’t like.

                                                                          There’s a lot of cognitive research to back this up. One I can recall off-hand is a study that showed that telling someone something false and then telling them later that it is false does not undo the initial perception that it is true. It’s just the way the mind works.

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                                                                            Yeah exactly, I was going to say that I have never actually heard anyone use the 10x dev concept. I’ve only heard people rebutting it

                                                                            I even googled for the tweet mentioned in the article, and I found it, but meh I wouldn’t have seen it otherwise

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                                                                            I disagree. 10x developer is a great resource for making memes and posting it to r/programmingcirclejerk.

                                                                            /s

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                                                                            I tried following this guide, but my gitea instance just ran out of memory when I tried pushing my first commit to it.

                                                                            But thanks for pointing out fly.io! I discovered a lot of nice use cases (like hosting uptime kuma, testing to host my static blog et c) which seems to work fine this far.

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                                                                                Oh man, I totally need to update the guide to mention this. The same thing happened to me when setting this up. Gitea needs JUST BARELY over 256 MB for certain operations, so you can use the Fly dashboard or flyctl to scale it to a 512 MB instance. Technically, you will start accruing a bill, but the cost will be so small that you will probably get an email from Fly at the end of the month saying they won’t charge you at all (assuming your other usage is modest as well).