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    I have two recommendations:

    1. Post this message on the OCaml Discuss forum, discuss.ocaml.org . You will reach a lot more people because basically all the active OSS OCaml people hang out there.
    2. Use approval voting if you’re not already: https://electionscience.org/library/approval-voting/ . AV has many great properties like simplicity combined with expressiveness. It takes care of the vote splitting problem and encourages a more conciliatory approach to politics (‘I’m OK with X, and Y, but not Z’) and discourages polarization (‘I must be able to put X on top at all costs’).
    1.  

      Thanks for the tips.

      I kinda don’t see how a system where one strongly prefers A wouldn’t result in strategic voting against all other options.

      Anyway, we use two rounds - first to determine general acceptability of the option and then sort them. We plan to achieve better sorting by discouraging tactical voting.

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      Brings back memories from my youth… https://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=38128

      “Hey fellas, you’ve added the array type hint. That’s cool. Why can’t I hint the opposite?”

      “There is no need to do that.”

      15 years pass…

      “We bring you scalar type hints and union types! PHP is great!”

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        Of all the places to find a Stan Kelly reference, this I was not expecting.

        Edit: also @cadey, I think you have a typo around “host colon porn thing”, unless this is targeting a very different audience.

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          I thought I fixed that, oops.

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            Null sweat!

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              Should be fixed now!

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                You’ve made my day, chummer.

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              The Stan Kelly parody is beautiful.

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              It’s a fun game with some rough edges. I would love to be able to go on and design a LISP on top of it.

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                I just love Fira Mono. But Source Code Pro was very close, too.

                It depends on the screen and eyesight as well. I’ve used to prefer much sharper fonts on 1080p screen - before getting glasses to correct for my astigmatism. With corrected eyesight and 4k screen, I tend to prefer much fancier fonts. Probably because they are still sharp enough and I don’t need them to be pixel-aligned to remain readable.

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                  I’m curious what OS you’re using. Windows’ font rendering tries to align lines in fonts to pixel boundaries so that you get sharp edges at the expense of slightly inaccurate kerning. Apple’s fond rendering tries to place lines exactly where they should be and so relies more on antialiasing and makes glyphs look slightly blurry but with better kerning. I don’t know where various other *NIX systems fall on this line these days, but those two extremes are likely to cause very different experiences.

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                    Fedora.

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                  Yay, yet another browser API for something that has been solved by JS.

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                    Decades of “solutions” and still MITRE rates this as top 2 / top 1 most dangerous and common vulnerability. I firmly believe this should become the browser’s responsibility.

                    Disclaimer, I’m quoted in the article and author of the spec :-)

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                      I trust that there are some really good reasons. What troubles me is the growing browser spec, is all.

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                      This but unironically. It’s good to be able to do more things without running JS.

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                        Has it, though? The current solutions depend on irregularities of their implementation. Plus, this runs at native speed.

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                        Helping to negotiate governing coalition program. We want an IT minister, but our partners would prefer to keep the current situation where every ministry keeps their favorite suppliers and ignores any and all integration attempts.

                        We fucked up the election and let our coalition partner advertise for preferential votes, even though it was explicitly forbidden in our agreement. We fell from 22 to just 4 seats in the Parliament due to just 7% of our common voters favoring our partner very strongly while our voters respected the ordering from the primaries. Sigh.

                        They don’t have enough competent people, though, so we are going to land couple ministries anyway. Probably. World is weird.

                        I am also impatiently waiting to learn whether I got reelected for the head of the party IT department. It has been 2 years already! Wow.

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                          It’s even worse. Most users are unable to input URL when prompted verbally. They use the search field on their home page.

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                            Yes, it’s pretty much the 60+ method in my impression. I hope kids these days know better.

                            But even when you know the difference, there is one more hurdle: My memory, at least, is not just case insensitive, but TLD insensitive: Was it .com, .org or .net again? Sometimes, I guess wrong, and find a shady spam site insetad. I need a TLD resolver, and I use both search engines and Wikipedia for that.

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                              High school computer science teacher here, and I can assure you the kids these days do not know better, unfortunately.

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                                More like 50+, at least around me. They also love to share their passwords with me. :shrug:

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                                  I really hate the TLD proliferation. Now you can’t even just assume a company is .com, now it might be .pizza. Or one of those godawful dots in the middle of the word. Those are the worst.

                                  I’ve used search for things I was even quite confident of just because of that.

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                                If someone from Google reads this, it seems that GMail fails to validate ISRG Root X1 when sending emails though a 3rd party SMTP server using the “Add another email address you own” functionality. JFYI

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                                  Not exactly what the author is looking for, but class NFData from the deepseq package allows one to fully evaluate a thunk.

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                                    I believe the author wants to be able to statically tell apart strict and non-strict data in order to avoid mixing them accidentally.

                                  1. 2

                                    I’ve been working on a very unconventional idea of exposing an HTTP interface for Postgres https://github.com/maxpert/phanpy

                                    There are options like PostgREST, or GraphQL, but I’ve never been convinced of DSLs, or new query language being as robust and powerful as SQL itself (I can keep ranting for my experiences but I won’t do it here). It streams the rows, hence the memory overhead is extremely low (over 1K RPS under 50MB). I’ve had in production with all these DSLs. While I am still working on adding resilience features like circuit breakers, and stampede prevention I am open to suggestions and feedback.

                                    1. 1

                                      What makes PostgREST exceptional is the fact that it propagates HTTP headers to the query environment (including auth proxy headers).

                                      Is phanpy safe in this regard, or is it possible to craft such a query that would trick your views and stored procedures into thinking the caller is somebody else?

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                                        Not yet. I am answering the fundamental questions yet. It is extremely important that I validate the fit and correctness of solution first. These edge cases can land in later.

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                                      But I really like my statically-typed heterogeneous lists. :’-(

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                                        Learning Godot while vacationing in Spain. :-)

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                                          It’s worse.

                                          News content is frequently long winded, but rather light on details and references. And even reputable media tend to have a couple of journalists rushing out the usual diluted crap.

                                          I’ve come to like a local paid journal that has a twitter-like short news feed and much relaxed pace of regular articles.

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                                            The tone of this article seems to imply that if could only get GNOME to be stable in both form and function, and not suck, then windows users might move. And there may be a handful of power users who like that kind of paradigm for whom this is true?

                                            But for most users the situation is the same now as it has been for the majority of my life: the users don’t choose windows. They know that Macs do not run windows, and that all other computers run windows. Their computers at school (except the Mac lab) and work (except certain Mac heavy industries) use Windows. If they still own a home computer (which they do less and less) it also came with windows. Windows is part of the computer. No amount of software development, software excellence, UX work, or stability can reach these users, and they are most of the users.

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                                              No amount of software development, software excellence, UX work, or stability can reach these users, and they are most of the users.

                                              Not true. You are imagining “everyone”. Nobody like that exists. Make it good for a specific group and they will switch. Often due to word of mouth.

                                              Just stop caring about your grandma’s PC already. Care about your colleague, who could have easier job with Blender and ffmpeg on Linux. Or your startup with kicad and FreeCAD doing the heavy lifting.

                                              Way away from MS Office is not LibreOffice, it’s a wiki, CodiMD and a good ERP solution.

                                              1. 3

                                                My grandma’s PC is easy to switch, that’s not the hard part ;)

                                                The point is that you can’t target improvements at a specific group if that group is made of people who have no idea you exist or that the OS exists or that it could ever be replaced. Like I said, people don’t choose windows, it’s just there.

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                                                  Right, but they come to you, because you are the expert. That’s the moment you can make them aware. ;-)

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                                                    For friends and family yes, sure. Getting the ones who rely on me to switch has never been much issue

                                            1. 4

                                              I love how easy is to parse something in Haskell.

                                              • For small ad-hoc parsers, there is built-in Text.ParserCombinators.ReadP. I end up using it in places I would use a regex or strpos/splitting/slicing in other languages.

                                              • For anything more complicated I love to use Megaparsec, which is fast, has great error reporting and has interface very similar to ReadP above.

                                              1. 2

                                                Thanks. Now I need to fix my code as well.

                                                By the way, I believe that Redmine uses just the token to both identify and authenticate API users. Does that mean what I think it means?

                                                1. 3

                                                  My cognitive dissonance is off the charts these days with Microsoft. Are they the goodies?

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                                                    They are a big company doing many different things. It saves a lot of heartache to ditch the goodie/baddie scale and consider each activity on its merits. And in this case I think they’re onto something good. I for one would sacrifice 10-50% JS speed to rule out an entire class of common security bugs.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      ditch the goodie/baddie scale and consider each activity on its merits.

                                                      I gradually changed to this thinking approach after I crossed 33-34, however I struggle to communicate this thinking approach to people. Is there a name for this mental model?

                                                      1. 3

                                                        People are complex, organizations change over time. Initial impressions matter a large amount, but people who are interested update their opinions on the basis of new information, while retaining history.

                                                        One way to do this is bayesian estimation. The two primary problems with bayesian estimation are that people are no good at keeping track of their priors and are no good at estimating new probabilities.

                                                        It is reasonable to assume that Microsoft, at any time, is doing something clever, something stupid, and a lot of things that they think will make them money in a medium-term future.

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                                                          Right tool for the job. It almost always redirects the conversation to the technical merits than moral policing. That does not mean moral and ethical considerations are useless, it just helps better calibrate the discussion.

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                                                      They are:

                                                      • Giving schools free copies of their office package in order to maintain their OS and productivity software dominance on the desktop.
                                                      • Lobbying public sector heavily to get locked into Azure.
                                                      • Using their dominant position to get the whole public sector as well as kids and students onto Teams and O365 with a recurring subscription.
                                                      • Cross selling One Drive heavily on their non-enterprise Windows editions.
                                                      • Showing ads and install bloatware in their non-enterprise Windows editions.

                                                      They want nothing else than total platform dominance and they don’t care about the little people, obviously. The question is, do you consider total dependence of our administrations and of the less-well-off on them a goodie?

                                                      1. 4
                                                        • Microsoft fights to get big Pentagon contracts. GitHub can’t even drop a small ICE contract, because Microsoft doesn’t want to offend the military-industrial complex.
                                                        1. 3

                                                          Thank you.

                                                          1. 6

                                                            No problem.

                                                            They also care about developers and fund some important research, so it’s not all black & white. Just to be fair.

                                                          2. 1

                                                            Google, Amazon, Apple, etc do things too, it’s not like MS is alone in their, MY PLATFORM ONLY perspective.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              True, but I have yet to see GAA employees to write local laws.

                                                              I am pretty sure their lobbyist are real busy in Brussels and Washington, though.

                                                          3. 8

                                                            I think, very approximately, corporations which sell platforms tend to act like arseholes when they have the upper hand (in terms of network effects and lock-in) and saintly when they don’t.

                                                            e.g. 10-14 years ago, with win32 being the juggernaut of “we already sunk cost into desktop apps on this platform” and the iPhone only just being released, Microsoft were barely even bothering to disguise their efforts to extinguish open protocols. Meanwhile Apple were pushing html5 hard as the big thing that would allow software to work beautifully on all platforms.

                                                            Whereas now we have Microsoft very much less dominant and Apple have a near monopoly on phones purchased by the subset of users who spend money on their phones. So Microsoft are promoting open everything, and Apple are doing things like strategically dragging their feet on html5 features, adding horrendous bugs to iOS Safari and not fixing them for months to years.

                                                            1. 5

                                                              Nope. I think they’re doing a great job of “embrace” though.

                                                              http://www.catb.org/~esr/halloween/

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                                                                No such thing–these companies look out for themselves, period. But you are better off with more than one company duking it out, because to compete they will (sometimes) do things that are pro-consumer or pro-developer or whatever.

                                                                Microsoft on top of the world tried to keep the Web stagnant once they’d killed Netscape, and undermined the growth of Linux and GPL software every way they could. Microsoft as a bit more of an underdog likes Web standards, runs GitHub, and builds the favorite open-source dev environment of a bunch of new coders.

                                                                Same with, for example, AMD and Intel. AMD got competitive and prices of high-core-count chips plummeted–great! Now with a chip shortage and a solid follow-up product, AMD is in a position to start raising prices, and they are. Intel getting its manufacturing improvements on track would probably give us more of a price war in certain segments, not less!

                                                                I’m old enough to remember when AWS was exciting to smaller devs because you didn’t have to shell out upfront for servers or provision far in advance for spiky loads. 🤣 Now it’s a huge profit center for Amazon and there are plenty of justifiable complaints about pricing (notably for egress) and undermining open-source-centric companies by using their market position to compete with the product developer’s own managed offerings.

                                                                Tactically, I guess I want underdogs to reach competitiveness, and for companies to see some benefit to doing good things (e.g. open sourcing things) and cost to bad ones (e.g. pushing out little companies) even when the immediate economic incentives point the wrong way. But in the long run all these companies respond to their economic situation and none of them are your friend.

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  It doesn’t really make much sense to blame the moral character of individual actors when there’s a system of incentives and punishments driving things. If a big company were all saints and angels, they’d be out competed by another company that was willing to play the cutthroat game to maximum advantage. (And sometimes it is worth noting playing the cutthroat game to maximum advantage means doing good things, and sometimes good things come out of bad actions too, but if the market+political winds shift, they’ll (eventually) shift with it or go out of business.)

                                                                  They’re doing what they think will make them money without getting another nasty visit from the government regulators. So is Google and Apple and Mozilla. None are good or bad per se, they’re all just navigating the same sea.

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                                                                    I’ll add to mordae that they were using legal muscle to extract billions in patent royalties from Android. I saw one article claim that stopped. I haven’t followed it in a while. You could check to see if they still patent troll others in general. I mean, that’s clearly evil.

                                                                    On showing ads, the traditional logic for desktop software, games, etc is that people who pay don’t see ads. Microsoft started putting ads in paid products, including the Xbox. After gamers protested, they expanded how many were on the screen instead of reduced it.

                                                                    One might also count the integration between single-player games with Xbox Live. I shouldn’t have to login to an online service to play an offline game. If I am offline, I shouldn’t lose access to my progress, items, etc. I recall having to deal with stuff like that on Xbox. The nature of online service is they eventually discontinue it for some products and services. Then, they’ll stop working at all or not work as well. All of this is done to maximize sales of new products using Microsoft’s and their suppliers’ platforms.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    Swipe to archive / delete / spam would be nice. Otherwise, great job! Might switch away from proprietary AquaMail.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Lol, I happen to have switched to Aqua Mail when K9 announced that development would stop. :’) I’ll wait a couple of years to see if K9 development is stable

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                                                                        Does Aqua Mail have PGP encryption support?

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          Only S/MIME, AFAIK.

                                                                      1. 8

                                                                        Thanks for all the fish. Hope you won’t stray too far from my needs or I’d be screwed, because you are not interested in whatever I need, because you know better. Not even a toggle.