Threads for munyari

  1. 9

    And with all the money spent on lawyers they could have made 6 accessible websites and still have enough money left for one hell of an launching party.

    1. 3

      That’s probably not so much money if you compare it to the precedent it creates and the number of websites that won’t need to be built this way (which in our current industry is an added cost).

      1. 4

        Making an accessible website shouldn’t an added cost; it isn’t actually that difficult to do…

        1. 7

          Easy if you know how & you do it right the first time.

          If you get it wrong the first time, fixing it can easily cost nearly as much as building the site again.

          1. 3

            It is an additional cost, in the same way that adding any additional requirements is an added cost. Maybe you mean that it should be cheap to do?

            1. 1

              I definitely agree that it shouldn’t be.

              Today, if you’re a business asking another company to build your website, this is usually an « option », which has an added cost.

        1. 2

          My take away is that you don’t need to read any book in particular to reach the ‘staff’ level. There’s nothing on this list that isn’t accessible to a junior with a year of experience.

          1. 2

            Definitely. Guess what I meant (and poorly explained) was that many people don’t think a lot about non-technical aspects of engineering until they get to senior levels. Or at least I didn’t 😬.

            Will update the article to reflect that. Thanks for the feedback!

            1. 1

              You’re welcome! I might pick up “The Pyramid Principle” based on this and JulianWgs’ comment

          1. 4

            Hell, there are people selling services that manipulate your GitHub streaks for you! Search for “git gardener” for example.

            I always look at the actual commit history whenever someone sends me their GitHub profile as a part of their CV.

            1. 1

              I was thinking “who would fall for this”? but realized that I’ve only ever been contacted by non-technical recruiters from my GitHub, and even highly technical people can be lazy/rely on gameable heuristics.

            1. 1

              Digging into Practical TLA+ as work begins to wind down.

              1. 33

                Great story, but why do so many people think it’s a good idea to write entire articles on Twitter? It’s even worse than publishing them on Medium, and that says a lot!

                  1. 16

                    Because that’s where the readers are. (Same reason Willie Sutton robbed banks.)

                    I hate Twitter so, so much, and that’s one of the reasons. Even with the new supersize 280-char limit, it’s still such a choked, impoverished writing medium. Constraints can be good, but when they’re a choice, not when you’re forced into the constraint because it’s baked into the only platform that meets your needs.

                    1. 12

                      Writing is also pretty easy too for them. Each thought can be composed piecemeal and worked into a larger thread. It’s compatible with shorter attention spans for /writing/.

                      Maintaining a blog is ceremony/effort if you’re not actively committed to it. The next lowest effort/easiest distribution is Medium, and we all know what we think of that.

                      Constraints can be good, but when they’re a choice, not when you’re forced into the constraint because it’s baked into the only platform that meets your needs.

                      Many constraints were because of forced limitations. That was the post of many of them.

                      1. 3

                        Yeah, you’re right about forced constraints. I guess it’s that any one constraint is good for some things but bad for others. Twitter has been a great boon to standup comedians and haiku poets, I’m sure.

                        WordPress.com is pretty low-effort; it has issues but not so much as Medium. If it or something like it were more popular, people could write their tweet-threads there. Unless, as you say, they’re ADD enough that they’d get blank-page fright and never write anything.

                        (I’m trying hard not to start bemoaning the demise of LiveJournal again. It coulda been a contendah…)

                        1. 12

                          Another thing that might be interesting is that people can reply to the indivual atomic units of thought easily too. It’s really more like structured/permament IRC than it is a blog.

                          And yes, from the people who DO write mega tweet storms tell me, blank page fright is huge.

                          1. 9

                            WordPress.com is pretty low-effort; it has issues but not so much as Medium. If it or something like it were more popular, people could write their tweet-threads there. Unless, as you say, they’re ADD enough that they’d get blank-page fright and never write anything.

                            I don’t know; I suspect it’s more of a barrier-of-entry thing. Twitter is kind of ephemeral and “write and forget”, whereas writing on your personal WordPress site takes more effort, as it’s less ephemeral.

                            The same with comments on e.g. Lobsters: I usually just write them, read over them a little bit, and post. Whereas on my website I tend to take a lot longer to write more or less the same stuff. If something’s on my website, I want to make sure it’s reasonably accurate, comprehensive, and written as well as I can. Usually this entire process takes up quite a lot of time for me. For some Lobster comment or Twitter remark, it’s a bit different.

                            It’s really difficult to put my feelings on this in words; so I hope this makes sense 😅 But publishing something on my (or any) website just comes with a lot higher barrier of entry for me, and I’m probably not so special that I’m the only one.

                            @calvin mentioned “blank page fright”; which is more or less the same thing in a way, just expressed different, I think(?)


                            At any rate, Twitter is hardly my favourite platform for these kind of things, but if the choice is between “it would never be published at all” and “it’s published on a platform I don’t like”, then the second option is clearly the better one.

                        2. 4

                          Because that’s where the readers are.

                          Then Tweet a link.

                          Might be a great story, but I’m not reading it in 20 parts on Twitter.

                          1. 4

                            And many people will not click a link.

                            1. 2

                              Plus clearly many, many people are. Writers go where readers are, and though you may not like reading things in this way on Twitter, there are enough people who do to make a market for this sort of material.

                            2. 1

                              The choked, impoverished writing medium is what makes it so much fun!

                            3. 11

                              For some people this is the answer.

                              It’s easier to just write a set of tweets. When you publish a wall of text you gotta format it, you feel like proof-reading, etc.

                              A tweetstorm is like…. whatever, just get it out there. Hell, type it in drafts and it’ll post the tweetstorm for you.

                              This is like instagram stories: A way to reduce the barrier to sharing content. And some stuff is low effort, but some stuff is just high quality. It’s also, like other said, a way to share to people who are following you.

                              1. 2

                                you gotta format it, you feel like proof-reading, etc.

                                I think there might be a reason why people do this.

                                Ironically, this ‘article’ is more of a ‘wall of text’ than most blog posts, in that it’s just a collection of ‘text bricks’ stacked on top of each other, with no real structure. As a result, it’s practically unreadable.

                                1. -1

                                  Thanks for pointing this tweet out, but I don’t buy that for a minute. If you have so much ADHD that you can’t do it any other way, you could still tweet your story and then copy-paste the sentences into a blog post. No one could be that debilitated by ADHD that he wouldn’t be able to do this basic thing.

                                  Also, a blog post is written once and read many times (ideally). It’s disrespectful to your readers to force this horrible format on them. If I were in this situation, I’d ask a friend to help me format a “tweetstorm” into a nice blog article. Even long texts wouldn’t take that much time.

                                  1. 11

                                    Uh, hey maybe don’t make comments that people with ADHD could do something when the evidence and statements of actual people with ADHD say they can’t. One of the key experiences of ADHD is executive dysfunction, meaning mental challenges around planning, problem-solving, organization, and time management. People with executive dysfunction (which isn’t solely experienced by people with ADHD) describe it in a number of ways that can be illuminating:

                                    Mental differences like this aren’t something you push through. Maybe sometimes you can (people with disabilities often describe experiencing fluidity in the severity of their challenges), but maybe sometimes you can’t. The experience of others demanding that they push through, or judging them for failing to push through, is one of the main challenges faced by disabled people. If you spend time listening to disability advocates, you’ll hear them talk about how they’re not disabled because something is wrong with them, they’re disabled because of limitations in the systems we all operate within, and the expectations and demands of our collective culture.

                                    So please, don’t toss out comments about how disabled people ought to function. They’re doing their best, and the expectations you’re putting out there are a core part of the challenges they face.

                                    1. 1

                                      Did you even read my comment before pasting your pasta here? Even disabled people ought to be able to ask for help, and in this case, I see no reason why someone with ADHD and executive dysfunction shouldn’t be able to ask someone for help in this regard.

                                      1. 6

                                        I did read your comment.

                                        I’m also flattered you think my post is a copypasta.

                                        Seems unlikely you’ll be convinced, but to hammer it home: saying “disabled people ought to be able” or even “disabled people ought,” is the problem. If you do not have executive dysfunction, you do not know what it’s like to live with, and should defer to people who do live with it when they talk about what is reasonably doable for them.

                                        1. 3

                                          I’m also flattered you think my post is a copypasta.

                                          Not taking sides here, but just wanna say, that is the best kind of rhetoric.

                                        2. 6

                                          Let me describe how I post on Lobsters. First, I think about what I want to post. Then, usually I don’t post it.

                                          If I do decide to post, then I commit myself to keeping a browser tab open for about half an hour while I write my post. I try to get my evidence lined up, opening additional tabs with each consideratum so that I won’t forget what I’m writing about.

                                          Paragraphs are usually written out of order. Entire sentences are written, rewritten, discarded, and written again. Phrases become semantically satiated and read wrong in my mind. I worry that I have used too many words. I worry that I haven’t used enough.

                                          I constantly feel disconnected from myself and also from my audience. I don’t understand how to relate to people, or how to ensure that my meanings are preserved. In fact, I am used to being horribly and hilariously misinterpreted.

                                          The help that I would ask from you is for you to reread the parent post and reconsider your stance. There is no universal way in which humans are supposed to interact with computers.

                                          Alternatively, take a programmer’s point of view: A module is not merely a collection of code snippets, and it is disingenuous to suggest that folks can simply collate code snippets into meaningful modules.

                                      2. 7

                                        Also, a blog post is written once and read many times (ideally). It’s disrespectful to your readers to force this horrible format on them. If I were in this situation, I’d ask a friend to help me format a “tweetstorm” into a nice blog article. Even long texts wouldn’t take that much time.

                                        But you’re not in this situation.

                                        1. 4

                                          You may not realise it, but this is what your post looks like from the outside:

                                          • You’re mistaking your personal dislike for a universal dislike.
                                          • You’re laying your personal preferences on other people as responsibilities.
                                          • You’re presuming you know what other people can or can’t do, or how they should or shouldn’t spend their energy and friend-favours.

                                          That is not how you reason your way to correct conclusions, and it is not how you win friends and influence people.

                                      3. 8

                                        No constraints, no glory!

                                        But really the real reason is that I put weeks of research and editing into my blog posts, in some case months… while I can hammer a tweetstorm out in five minutes.

                                        1. 4

                                          As much as I hate Twitter ‘articles’, I think they’re actually better than Medium articles, which is… impressive.

                                          1. 1

                                            Agreed. This would be a pretty lengthy blog post, and this format is just awful. Really good war story though.

                                          1. 0

                                            I’ll definitely be sharing this with my team at work. Thanks OP!

                                            1. 4

                                              I recently read this paper for the first time, and really enjoyed it. This summarizing quote at the end is particularly good

                                              Program construction consists of a sequence of refinement steps. In each step a given task is broken up into a number of subtask. Each refinement in the description of a task may be accompanied by a refinement of the description of the data which constitute the means of communication between the subtasks. Refinement of the description of program and data structures should proceed in parallel.

                                              There are a few errors in the OCR (or manual transcription?) that produced this document, so here’s a scanned PDF.

                                              Also see this related paper that conceptualizes software design as a series of transformations on a spec into an implementation.

                                              1. 2

                                                Thanks for sharing!

                                                Also see this related paper that conceptualizes software design as a series of transformations on a spec into an implementation.

                                                This is something I’m very interested in. In order for this to work correctly, though, the specification needs to be a mathematical implementation of sorts. I like the way Lamber Meertens describes the concept in his 1986 paper on “Algorithmics”.

                                                It’s still early days in the design and implementation, but I’m hoping to provide first-class support for these kinds of program transformations in the programming language I’m designing. It would be incredible to have a language that fully spans from high level prototyping, for writing specifications, down to low-level optimization, for achieving peak performance.

                                                1. 3

                                                  Hey, I know that guy! :)

                                                  In fact, I worked at the Kestrel Institute (https://kestrel.edu) ~20 years ago where he was a researcher. They had built a very impressive program synthesis toolkit that aimed to let you do refinement for a category-theoretic model of your problem domain down to running code, with a theorem prover wired up to check your work along the way. The “intermediate representation” between the categorical model and actual hardware was Common Lisp, so there was a lot of opportunity for localized optimization. There wasn’t a rigorous model for thr entirety of that language, sadly, so you kind of broke the chain of formal logic once you dropped down to that level. C and Java code generators came later, but AFAIK the bootstrapping code never moved away CL. (The language was self-hosting once you had the environment up but you couldn’t exactly get to network sockets and other useful but messy imperative stuff without the CL utility libs.)

                                                  I was very much not anywhere near their level when it came for formal methods (or CS in general); my job was basically building internal tools, websites, and packaged versions of the toolkit for distribution on “uninteresting” platforms like Windows and (very newly, at the time) OS X. It was definitely fun to sit around the lunch table with that crew and just soak up the conversation, even when I couldn’t meaningfully contribute.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Your language sounds like an exciting project 🙂 Thanks for the paper, I’ll add it to my reading list.

                                                1. 5

                                                  mosh is amazing. I discovered after ~3 months of dropped ssh connections over a very poor internet connection. If only port forwarding was possible.

                                                  1. 4
                                                    1. 2

                                                      If only there was a native Windows client …

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Port forwarding is absolutely possible: Use ssh for it.

                                                        If you want a proper VPN that stands up to a lossy connection, use IPSEC with a dummy network.

                                                        mosh is secure remote desktop for terminals: Such a thing didn’t exist before mosh (or it wasn’t very good), but forwarding TCP is a solved problem.

                                                      1. 8

                                                        It was irresponsible and dumb.

                                                        It’s also what journalists have done forever. The term “doxxing” is the new part… the idea of allowing people to preserve the anonymity of their online identity is relatively new. I think we’re going to see a protracted struggle to establish a new cultural norm about this.

                                                        For example, can you believe that companies used to publish big books with everybody’s name, home address, and phone number printed right in it? And they would give it away totally for free. (I’m only half-joking… kids now are stunned to learn that phone books used to be a thing.)

                                                        1. 2

                                                          allowing people to preserve the anonymity of their online identity

                                                          It’s more of a collective fiction. Let’s all pretend that what we wrote last year can no longer be accessed by the people we have silly feuds with today. So many people think that this is a good idea, that even the European Union took it seriously and gave people the right to rewrite online history to better suit their mood.

                                                          Real anonymity is hard, with almost all the communication channels wiretapped with the excuse of terrorists and paedophiles, so we’re supposed to focus on pretend-anonymity now. Unfortunately, it’s working.

                                                          1. 9

                                                            I have to disagree. Your point about the intractability of the problem is well-taken, but taking the attitude that anonymity is a fiction has the result that nobody feels responsible for fixing it.

                                                            Besides, there actually is a clear line here: Disclosing somebody’s legal residence has very real consequences for them. And it’s clear that putting it together in this case wasn’t an easy task, even though the information was nominally “public”.

                                                            People who have the knowledge and experience to follow that kind of trail should be careful about how they use it, just as a locksmith shouldn’t go around unlocking random people’s doors and rationalize it by saying they’re just rearranging public pieces of metal which were on the outside of the home.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Unlocking a locked door is clearly a single unified action. There might be some objective sense in which it’s a bunch of separate movements of pieces of metal, but no human would see it that way.

                                                              There is something deeply, viscerally oppressive about the idea that it might be ok to read published fact A, read published fact A => B, but not ok to publish B. It seems like 1984-style doublethink.

                                                              1. 4

                                                                I think your second paragraph is insightful, and gets to the heart of a lot of objections to my position, especially objections from technically-minded people. Thank you for saying it.

                                                                I nonetheless do take the position you mention. “Not okay” is a pretty broad term, and I’m not suggesting it should be illegal… but I really do feel that it’s the consequences, not the actions themselves, which should have primary importance when we talk about ethics.

                                                                I don’t really think the “single unified action” thing is a meaningful distinction; I think that it’s a valid perception, but more a matter of perspective than anything really different between the scenarios. I had to hire a locksmith not long ago, which is why it came to mind; I’m pretty sure it was a bunch of individual steps to him, establishing tension then working one pin at a time, even though to me the upshot was that I waited a few minutes and then my door was open. (It was also somewhat frightening how few minutes it took.)

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I don’t really think the “single unified action” thing is a meaningful distinction; I think that it’s a valid perception, but more a matter of perspective than anything really different between the scenarios. I had to hire a locksmith not long ago, which is why it came to mind; I’m pretty sure it was a bunch of individual steps to him, establishing tension then working one pin at a time, even though to me the upshot was that I waited a few minutes and then my door was open. (It was also somewhat frightening how few minutes it took.)

                                                                  Well, put it this way: I don’t think there are many noncontrived cases where it would be unclear who had unlocked your door. I mean it would be possible for a locksmith to jiggle a few pins, leave the tools in place, and have another locksmith come and finish it off, but I don’t think that’s a common enough case that we need to worry about the morality of it.

                                                                  I’m reminded of the “ghost gun” business in the US. Roughly, from memory: commercial gun sellers are required to register their sales, but private individuals are allowed to make their own guns, and gun professionals are allowed to sell replacement parts or help people assemble guns without needing to check registration. Eventually the government was obliged to formalise things, and thus we have the “80% finished lower receiver”: one particular part is regarded as being “the gun”, and it’s considered a piece of metal after it’s shaped but before the holes are drilled in it, and a gun afterwards. So to “make” your own gun you can buy the parts, drill the holes in that one piece yourself, then get it assembled.

                                                                  Kind of absurd, but at least they did manage to draw a line somewhere. Doing this with linking a name and address is much harder - is it the person who publishes that person x went to school in town y? The person who publishes that internet personality z is a fan of sports team w?

                                                                  It doesn’t feel like it should be the person who puts published facts together, though maybe that’s my biases. The classical philosophical tradition is that all true logical statements are regarded as vacuous; if we knew all the facts that lead us to a given conclusion, then we already knew the conclusion. This is unsatisfying when it comes to something like Fermat’s Last Theorem, where the proof was clearly an enormous amount of work. But we don’t really have a good model for assigning credit/blame for that kind of work - for mathematical theorems the credit tends to go to whoever puts the capstone on, but that seems rather unfair. We seem to be approaching these inferences the same way.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    Sorry I missed this yesterday.

                                                                    You make a fair point. The category of response I’m thinking about is: I’m less interested in assigning blame than in raising awareness. If people are conscious of how the information they’re sharing could be used against other people, we can get to a higher level of responsibility. It would be unreasonable to demand constant caution until awareness of the threat model is widespread.

                                                                    If I were trying to assign blame, I’d place it on everyone who could reasonably anticipate the result. People who post things; site owners who don’t have a process to remove private information; unnecessarily broad data-retention policies; people who train customer-service representatives and don’t adequately prepare them for social engineering … In this particular case I do imagine some of the blame belongs with the journalist who put the pieces together; I kind of doubt that it was entirely a matter of web searching, or it would have happened long before.

                                                                    But I really am not trying to assign blame so much as encourage people to take responsibility. I understand that this must seem like a fantasy, but if every raindrop decided to be responsible, there wouldn’t be a flood.

                                                              2. 0

                                                                People who have the knowledge and experience to follow that kind of trail should be careful about how they use it, just as a locksmith shouldn’t go around unlocking random people’s doors

                                                                A more appropriate comparison would be a photographer going around public places and taking pictures. Not illegal, not immoral, not unexpected. (yes, I think requiring Google/Bing Maps to blur faces and street numbers is absurd).

                                                                1. 5

                                                                  You’re just restating your position that there’s nothing immoral here. I don’t want to put words in your mouth, but I understand your reasoning to be that people should expect doxxing to happen, and therefore there cannot be anything wrong with it, regardless of its effects. But I expect a laptop to get stolen if I leave it visible in my car; that doesn’t mean the thief has done nothing wrong. Have I summarized accurately? Do we agree on that example? Does it seem like a relevant example to you?

                                                                  You don’t have to debate, of course, and I’m happy to drop this if you want to. Just to say that, because it can’t be taken for granted.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Have I summarized accurately? Do we agree on that example? Does it seem like a relevant example to you?

                                                                    No, of course not. My position is that “doxxing” is nothing more than journalism and that journalism is not illegal, not even when done by amateurs.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Heh, well it’s of course to you, but that’s why I asked…

                                                                      I feel like there are a lot of things that cause serious harm that aren’t illegal. The law necessarily takes a quite weak position on what things people should avoid doing. There’s no law that says you can’t cut in line at the supermarket, but don’t do it, anyway. I don’t really see the law as relevant here at all, so I doubt we’ll find agreement.

                                                            2. 2

                                                              For example, can you believe that companies used to publish big books with everybody’s name, home address, and phone number printed right in it? And they would give it away totally for free. (I’m only half-joking… kids now are stunned to learn that phone books used to be a thing.)

                                                              Are phonebooks no longer a thing in the United States? When did that stop?

                                                              1. 1

                                                                They were still publishing them as of a couple years ago, but I suspect they were mostly used as a source of free kindling for backyard BBQs.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  The Bells no longer print phone books themselves; that business was sold off, at least ten years ago, to independent companies. I’ve met salespeople who were doing hard-sell approaches to get local businesses to buy ads in the yellow pages, which was always a significant revenue source and now seems to be all that’s left.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              At a bare minimum you should be using a unique 32 character random alphanumeric on every website or service that you use

                                                              Source for this claim? What makes you say this is the “bare minimum”? Also, why restrict passwords to not include special characters?

                                                              1. 5

                                                                I do 20 characters alphanumeric, which gives about 120 bits¹ and is short enough to be bearable to type in by hand (or memorize) if necessary.

                                                                I do alphanumeric because I’ve had sites silently corrupt passwords that contain special characters (whereas alphanumeric is basically guaranteed to work) and they only buy you a few more bits regardless.


                                                                ¹ Which is sufficient. If an attacker can iterate through 10^20 passwords per second (an arbitrary guess at the processing power of the entire world), it will take them a trillion years to go through all of them. My secrets will certainly be uninteresting by then.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I generally do 25. I used to do 99, but found 25 to be right around the threshold of “I can tolerably type this in when necessary”. I don’t think I’ve ever encountered the silent corruption issue, but it’s an interesting issue.

                                                                  Reminds me of when I recently signed up for some website and it silently truncated my password when I logged in. I went to reset the password, and it just emailed me the password in plaintext. Yikes.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                That’s why I always open man-page/documentation before using a function. Until I know man-page by heart I will reopen the man-page and even then - better safe than sorry.

                                                                It is a bit funny how auto-completion in many cases would only give a false sense of understanding. But maybe it’s better than when I was using it. One could argue that it’s C’s fault, but surprising behavior can happen in every language and especially in an older one.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Shouldn’t the role of the language be to limit surprise?

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I love the idea behind qutebrowser, but it unfortunately still crashes too often, causing me to revert to chromium.

                                                                  1. 5

                                                                    What backend are you using (see :open qute:version)? With the last qutebrowser release and either the QtWebKit-NG (only packaged on Archlinux currently, as qt5-webkit-ng - and there’s a Gentoo ebuild) or the QtWebEngine backend (based on Chromium, you’ll need to start qutebrowser with --backend webengine, but with the new config there’ll be an option for it), I haven’t seen crashes in a long time.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Actually, since I wrote that comment I opened up qutebrowser and am pleasently surprised to report that it has not crashed in the past three hours. I had previously used the webengine backend but still had major stability issues, even while running of the qutebrowser-git package from the AUR, just two or three ago. Hopefully it’s stable enough to become my daily driver now. Keep up the good work! :)

                                                                      EDIT: 3 more hours later, I’ve had it crash 3 times. Seems to struggle when my shitty internet connection suddenly goes away.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Ouch. You’re most likely running into this Qt bug then.

                                                                        Currently qutebrowser still creates a QNetworkAccessManager even with QtWebEngine as it’s needed for some kinds of downloads (like the adblock lists). I want to convert those places to use the QtWebEngine/Chromium network stack as well, but QtWebEngine is still missing an API to do arbitrary downloads.

                                                                        Either way, qutebrowser can probably avoid creating a QNAM if it’s not needed, so this Qt bug doesn’t happen until a QNAM is needed in some way, at least. I opened an issue for that now.

                                                                  1. 19

                                                                    I found that neovim is much, much faster than vim, with a comparable setup. I would highly recommend trying it. I have been using neovim for over a year now, it’s very good. A lot of high quality plugins are being written with support for only neovim now.

                                                                    Additionally, I would highly recommend fzf.vim over CtrlP and others. I have tried all of the major fuzzy finding plugins for vim, and fzf.vim is by far the fastest and works how I would expect.

                                                                    I stopped using CtrlP because in a large project (several hundred thousand files), searching for a small string “icp” would not find “app/models/icp.rb”, but would instead find longer and more irrelevant results. fzf.vim works as I expect in this case.

                                                                    You also never need to invalidate the cache, it rebuilds every time you search. It’s fast enough that you can use it to search all files on your computer. You can do locate / | fzf and it’s ready to go in a second or so (you can still search while it’s indexing). In normal projects it’s pretty much instant.

                                                                    tl;dr: use neovim and fzf.vim. All hail junegunn.

                                                                    Edit: Oh, and if you want to use ctrl-p to activate it, add this to your vimrc.

                                                                    noremap <c-p> :FZF<CR>
                                                                    
                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Seconded, fzf is great. I didn’t yet know about the vim specific wrapper for it though, so thank you for that! This is part of why I love fzf, it’s not specific to vim and so I use it all the time, even when not inside vim.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        FWIW, OP was a neovim user.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          junegunn has made me love vim again. He’s tpope’s successor :-)

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          One example is CtrlP. It is currently the most recommended way of opening files in Vim. The default setup can be improved by using The Silver Searcher to find the files and using ctrl-py-matcher to match files with your search query. I always had issues with it.

                                                                          I see ripgrep + fzf recommended much more often nowadays

                                                                          From having to refresh every time I made a new file, to folders such as node_modules being included in the results unless I refreshed again (although this could be an issue with The Silver Searcher).

                                                                          Did you set this in your agignore?

                                                                          One of the settings that really slowed my Vim down, was the relativenumber setting. If you are not familiar with this setting, what it does is instead of displaying the actual line numbers in the file, it displays the how many lines away a line is relative to your current line. If that sounds confusing, just type :set relativenumber and you will see what I mean. Apparently this can make your Vim really slow when moving up and down.

                                                                          TIL! Looks like :lazyredraw may help with this? In any case, definitely not the first culprit I would point to for slow down, so thanks.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I see ripgrep + fzf recommended much more often nowadays

                                                                            I was not aware of fzf. I will try it out someday.

                                                                            Did you set this in your agignore?

                                                                            No, but it was in my gitignore, which ag supposedly used as well. That folder would appear randomly every time I refreshed.

                                                                            TIL! Looks like :lazyredraw may help with this? In any case, definitely not the first culprit I would point to for slow down, so thanks.

                                                                            lazyredraw helps a bit but not when you are required to scroll.

                                                                          1. 1
                                                                            if(transaction.merchant == "Deluxe Coffee") {
                                                                                root.postOnSlack('#coffee-club', 'Sarah bought a coffee!');
                                                                                return true; // Approve transaction
                                                                            } else {
                                                                                return false; // Fail transaction
                                                                            }
                                                                            

                                                                            Anybody who thinks they can write better fraud protection than the industry leaders is delusional.

                                                                            1. 6

                                                                              Anybody who thinks they can write better fraud protection than the industry leaders is delusional.

                                                                              Don’t be so dramatic. I can think of several trivial examples, for example:

                                                                              If I have a card used only for recurring transactions, then I can know the exact merchant, amount, and day-of-month to expect every transaction. I can use a whitelist, but none of my credit cards support such a thing.

                                                                              I could have it post an interactive message to slack or SMS me for everything else, with a button to “add to whitelist” and simply ask the company to retry my card if they get a decline. My American Express app shows the approval in real time but nothing I can do to stop/revert/abort it.

                                                                              I might lend someone my card and enable merchants within a few miles of me.

                                                                              And so on. This sounds awesome to me, and I’m eager to try it out.

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                If I have a card used only for recurring transactions, then I can know the exact merchant, amount, and day-of-month to expect every transaction. I can use a whitelist, but none of my credit cards support such a thing.

                                                                                Never thought about this, but that would be an amazing card feature

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Doesn’t seem to work from the Tor browser bundle

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                Neat. Now, who to follow?

                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                  All aboard the follow train - https://mastodon.social/@mulander

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    followed :P

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      Followed. I just set up https://mastadon.social/@munyari

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        I wondered why this link wasn’t working for me until I saw “mastadon” should be “mastodon” :P

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          I, too, am on this network, at https://icosahedron.website/@mjn

                                                                                      2. 4

                                                                                        Something that I think would fit the federated model well, if @jcs wanted to do it (or let someone else do it with the domain), is if there were a lobste.rs server. In addition to being able to follow individual people who use any federated server, the client also supports viewing a global firehose (all federated servers) or a local firehose (just this server). The latter, on smallish servers, can provide a kind of IRC-like community, while also interoperating with the broader Twitter-like usage.

                                                                                        I think people are still working out what the social configuration of a federated system would look like, though. Some tech exists, but a lot is still up in the air.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          I’m https://mastodon.social/@stevelord if anyone wants to follow me. Mostly posting AVR development and security stuff.

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            I’m there at @NinetyNine.

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              I’m there at pnathan.

                                                                                              My Twitter tends to be a blend of liberal retweets, bad jokes, and occasional tech remarks.

                                                                                              I also have some kind of other gnu social account I forgot somewhere, but it wasn’t interesting enough there…

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                Does that extend to the amount paid to the mentoring organisation?

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  If you’re asking if the mentoring organization gets a cut of the $6000 (adjusted for PPP) then no, this is payment to the student only. This page breaks down how mentoring organizations are paid.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    Ah, okay. If I remember right, last year, the payment for the org was basically what the student got.

                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                      Pretty sure it was always just 500 USD per accepted student for the org.

                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                        Ah, I misrembered that, too. Last year, the additional travel fund was just relatively close to what the student got as a stipend payment, so I confused that in my head.

                                                                                                        Thanks!

                                                                                                        Also fun:

                                                                                                        Google is not required to pay any invoice submitted more than ninety (90) days after the end of the Program.
                                                                                                        

                                                                                                        Always nice to lend poor international companies money.

                                                                                                        (For reference, old rules are here: https://web-beta.archive.org/web/20160615150102/https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com/rules/ )