1. -1

    3:2 aspect ratio display? Great, I look forward to every game I own being distorted or letterbox’ed on it. I didn’t know they even made displays with that aspect ratio.

    1. 19

      People often complains about the lack of vertical space. Why would games be distorted? Only video will be problematic on this ratio.

      1. 16

        The screen was specifically what put me over the top to buy one. I’ve been dreaming about a taller aspect screen since they made everything “wide” ten years ago.

        1. 2

          I would prefer a “normal” 4:3. The pixel density of the 13.5” 2256x1504 display is too low for 2x scaling. Something like 2400x1600 should be the lowest option.

          1. 2

            Obviously it’s all subjective, but I’d say 4:3 feels “dated” while 3:2 feels “super cool”.

        2. 8

          It is a lot more pleasant for coding, reading, and writing in my experience. 3:2 is great for that and I prefer it, but I don’t play many videogames anymore.

          Work forced me to used a 16:9 display for a while. I use a ultra-widescreen now because that breaks into 3 reasonable panes, but 2 vertical 16:9s was ok. For me, xrandr is linux’s killer-app.

          1. 5

            3:2 is great. My old Surface Book has 3:2; I’d much rather get a few inches of vertical space for coding and reading than avoid letterboxing for movies.

            In my experience PC games work just fine with 3:2 as well typically.

            1. 4

              I used one of the original Chromebooks, the Chromebook Pixel, for several months in 2015 and adored the 3:2 aspect ratio for everything except media consumption. It was a little awkward for fullscreen 16:9 videos but fine for 4:3. I recognize that not much content is 4:3 anymore, though.

              I’m a little concerned about the pixel density of the Framework screen being too low for HiDPI but I’m unlikely to buy one anytime soon having just bought a Lenovo Flex 5 CB earlier this year for my main mobile computing device.

              1. 2

                Yeah, I have one of those Chromebooks too. The aspect ratio is definitely the best thing about the whole machine by a long shot. If it weren’t for the glossy display I would have been tempted to use it as my daily driver (after wiping the OS of course).

            1. 6

              it looks like the output isn’t actually unified diff to be used as a patch? Seems like a missed opportunity

              1. 3

                Patches operate on text; this tool shows semantic difference, which is not the same thing as lexical difference.

                1. 8

                  The output of this tool is still text, though. You could produce a patch that only contained the lines with a semantic difference, which would be a huge win.

                2. 2

                  Wouldn’t you need a format that you require? Is one file formatted with black and one is formatted with flake8 and which do you want? Shouldn’t this be the first step or last step where you format the final file and the initial file with a formatter? Then you run this to see if there are differences and it will print them both in a “good” format? Or maybe after and print both the snippets piped through a formatter into a “good” format?

                  Think of working with two people’s code who doesn’t match your preferred style. Or someone submitting patches that don’t match your style. You don’t want a patch to push the formatting in either direction in the first case and definitely not in the post direction in the second case.

                1. 13

                  If I’m awaken at 2am from being on-call for more than once per quarter, then something is seriously wrong and I will either fix it or quit.

                  I quit my last job partially over this, at about the same paging rate :)

                  1. 2

                    Quit my first job after I was called every night around 1AM during my one week on-call rotation.

                  1. 28

                    As someone who wants Rust to succeed and thus be well funded but at the same time Facebook to be gone from this planet I find myself in a minority expressing concern about this. I find it weird that there’s very little objection to this from either the community or the foundation. The general consensus is “it’s free money”, “they’re doing great with open-source”, “who else should pay for this?” but I rarely see people questioning where this money comes from. Not to mention the concern that they could always threaten to remove the funding if x, y or z doesn’t happen.

                    1. 10

                      Are there open source projects Facebook has become a part of that went downhill as a result of them? (I get your point, I was just curious if there was a bad track record of their interaction with the open source community…)

                      1. 2

                        Not that I know of.

                      2. 10

                        When the founding members are Google, Huawei, AWS, Microsoft, and Mozilla I don’t know if there’s much point complaining that Facebook is joining in.

                        Personally, I think it’s probably one of the better ways for these companies to spend their money, and I don’t have any strong feelings about Rust one way or the other.

                        1. 2

                          I have about as much of a problem with Facebook as I do with every single other company on that list (including Mozilla itself). That is to say, they all do things I disapprove of, and there’s nothing particularly special about the things Facebook does that I disapprove of.

                        2. 6

                          First off, the funding is probably a rounding error in FB’s finances (and is almost certainly written off as charitable).

                          Second, sneakily enforcing FB’s will through subtle arm-twisting of the Rust Foundation is incredibly inefficient. This is a company that can literally decide a country’s election, should it wish to do so.

                          Third, Freedom Zero. As long as an organization follows the license and the code of conduct (if applicable) it can be as “evil” as it wants.

                          Frankly, FB hate is probably a small minority voice. If you’d ask the stereotypical person on the street, they’d probably rate FB as a very trusted company/brand, at the level of (say) Sony.

                          1. 5

                            Third, Freedom Zero. As long as an organization follows the license and the code of conduct (if applicable) it can be as “evil” as it wants.

                            Is this meant to be a convincing argument? Shouldn’t the last twenty years have put the myth of moral compartmentalization to rest?

                            Aside from that, this is not actually responsive to the concern it’s ostensibly addressing. “Hey, it’s a free country, they can do whatever they want,” is not a reasonable or helpful reply to, “Facebook’s involvement makes me uncomfortable for many obvious reasons.”

                            1. 2

                              Is this meant to be a convincing argument? Shouldn’t the last twenty years have put the myth of moral compartmentalization to rest?

                              It was the devil’s bargain the Rust project signed when they chose a license.

                              1. 1

                                I don’t think that picking a license that allows corporations to use, fork, contribute to etc your work requires you to put them on your foundation.

                                Though, given the list of founders, I don’t think you can get much worse by adding FB. And I’m struggling to imagine how Facebook’s badness could influence Rust in a negative way; I don’t think they’re trying to pull some weird ‘sabotage Rust from the inside because ???’ move.

                              2. 2

                                Aside from that, this is not actually responsive to the concern it’s ostensibly addressing. “Hey, it’s a free country, they can do whatever they want,” is not a reasonable or helpful reply to, “Facebook’s involvement makes me uncomfortable for many obvious reasons.”

                                I think is responsive, and the important point, to my eye, is that evil corporation X is benefiting from Rust already. Because it’s released under a license that upholds freedom zero.

                                If there’s discomfort, I think it should come from the fact that this community project is helping to further the agenda of a corporation that you consider evil.

                                The fact that they’re now participating in the funding of the project in addition to benefiting from its output doesn’t alter my level of discomfort. The bad thing is that they were already enjoying the benefits.

                                When you release software under a license that lets it be used for any purpose, that discomfort is a sunk cost IMO. Contributions that benefit the entire community seem like they should offset that.

                                I don’t see how compartmentalization comes into play here.

                              3. 2

                                Third, Freedom Zero. As long as an organization follows the license and the code of conduct (if applicable) it can be as “evil” as it wants.

                                I don’t see the connection. From The Free Software Definition on Wikipedia…

                                Finally, another freedom was added, to explicitly say that users should be able to run the program. The existing freedoms were already numbered one to three, but this freedom should come before the others, so it was added as “freedom zero”.

                                How is the argument “As long as an organization follows the license and the code of conduct (if applicable) it can be as “evil” as it wants.” related to Freedom Zero?

                                My take: it isn’t.

                                I think the argument above is making a different claim. The argument above suggests as long as an organization is complying with legal requirements, no other considerations matter. This, of course, is not true. Particularly with the Rust Foundation, they are free to have additional criteria. It is also in their interest to do so.

                                1. 1

                                  I think I see where you’re coming from.

                                  You’re not trying to prevent FB from using Rust or the tooling around it. You’d prefer the Rust Foundation to not accept funding from FB, under the assumption that the reputational hit from doing so would outweigh the monetary and other benefits deriving from FB’s support.

                                  I agree, that has nothing to do with Freedom Zero.

                                  1. 2

                                    Not exactly. I distinguish between Rust’s open source license and the Rust community’s governance model. I have confidence that the Rust Foundation is setup in a way that reduces undue influence from contributing organizations. Putting aside its societal impacts, Facebook has many well-meaning individuals and does a lot of good engineering work. I think FB’s contributions and support will likely be a net positive.

                                2. 2

                                  Rust Foundation is a 501(c)(6) business interest group, not a charitable foundation. To the extent that FB can write off tax against its donations that would be as a business expense and not as a charitable donation.

                                  (Almost every “we think Free Software Foundation sounds serious and we want to be taken seriously too” technology Foundation created in the USA after the FSF, most notably the Linux Foundation which is the legal home of many of the others, is a 501(c)(6) which is more a not-for-profit cartel than a charity. Notably 501(c)(6) are allowed to lobby in the interests of their corporate “donors” which 501(c)(3) may not do. If you want your public software to be managed in the public interest you have to look beyond corporate associations to groups like FSF, Conservancy, or SPI.)

                                  1. 2

                                    Thanks a lot for clearing that up. US non-profit law is confusing to outsiders.

                                3. 1

                                  You aren’t the only one who reacted that way. I have the same sentiments. Though given the other members….Rust could easily be in jeopardy of lost funding even without FB.

                                1. 7

                                  A $2000 bonus barely seems worth even botherng to give out, though maybe I should look up what that wasin 1996 dollars.

                                  Also, if I’m ever asked why I’m leaving my current job I always just say vague things like “time for something new”. I can’t imagine many interviewers expect a very “real” answer to that kind of question.

                                  I would not have quit over the small bonus, but over the toxic management environment that produced it.

                                  1. 6

                                    I would love to get to the point—and bring everybody else in society to the point—where a few thousand dollars of free money isn’t worth the paperwork. (And before the monkey’s paw curls, I will add not by increasing the paperwork)

                                    1. 1

                                      What’s the base salary for someone at DEC with a decade of experience in a senior role in 1996? I honestly have no idea if it’s $50K, $100K, $200K, or $500K. If it’s $50K, then an extra $2K is quite nice to have, if it’s $200K then it’s an extra 1% and if a 1% change in income makes a noticeable difference to you with that kind of salary then you probably need to re-evaluate your lifestyle. I don’t know what the cost of living was in Maynard (which Wikipedia tells me is a small suburban town 22 miles from Boston)), but I’d imagine that $25K was a big chunk of a year’s living expenses (if not more than a year) back then, whereas $2K is more in the ‘buy a new expensive toy’ category.

                                    2. 5

                                      I would absolutely have quit over that whole situation. Also, anyone interviewing me would get an honest reason why.

                                      1. 3

                                        A $2000 bonus barely seems worth even botherng to give out, though maybe I should look up what that wasin 1996 dollars.

                                        Seems to be around 3.5k-ish.

                                      1. 8

                                        The thing every commenter seems to be missing here is that the author concludes that Factorio is both unacceptable and terrible to use for interviewing (they note that doing it in less than 8 hours is noteworthy), yet it is still better than any other method popularly used, which is meant as an indictment of the popular methods.

                                        1. 11

                                          Will it let me modify this website to be accessible to people who can’t or don’t want to watch videos?

                                          1. 3

                                            Yeah, it is infuriating (and embarrassing) for an accessibility tool to not provide an accessible transcription of the videos. Meh.

                                            1. 7

                                              I don’t know why this is labeled “a11y”, it’s not necessarily a tool for enhancing accessibility.

                                            2. 2

                                              My phrasing here is trollish (apologies to anyone hurt) but my point is serious.

                                              1. 1

                                                If you follow the link to the web version of the Convivial Computing Salon paper, that page has plenty of writing about the project:

                                                In this paper, we present spreadsheet-driven customization, a technique that enables end users to customize software without doing any traditional programming. The idea is to augment an application’s UI with a spreadsheet that is synchronized with the application’s data. When the user manipulates the spreadsheet, the underlying data is modified and the changes are propagated to the UI, and vice versa.

                                                We have implemented this technique in a prototype browser extension called Wildcard.

                                              1. 9

                                                Professional-grade tools are, necessarily, more complex and require skill to use.

                                                I do not agree. Sometimes professional-grade tools are just… better. Like for cooks, for example.

                                                1. 2

                                                  This is a “well-actually”, FYI.

                                                  1. 15

                                                    The article is premised on a conflict between utility and usability. Pointing out that many professional tools are simpler or easier than amateur tools is an important nuance not covered in the article, and so is a valuable contribution. Dismissing it as a “well-actually” is not a valuable contribution.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I thought that this line covered the case of professional utility and usability:

                                                      Ideally, we can achieve both usability and utility, and often we do just that. But, sometimes, these tools require a steeper learning curve. If they are more useful in spite of that, they will usually save heaps of time in the long run.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        The quote rustybolt pasted is taken out of context and used misleadingly; here it is, at the end of the opening paragraph:

                                                        In many fields, professional-grade tooling requires a high degree of knowledge and training to use properly, usually more than is available to the amateur. The typical mechanic’s tool chest makes my (rather well-stocked, in my opinion) tool bag look quite silly. A racecar driver is using a vehicle which is much more complex than, say, the soccer mom’s mini-van. Professional-grade tools are, necessarily, more complex and require skill to use.

                                                        So it’s clear that the author is using that statement colloquially/with qualification, and anyone who actually read the preceding statements would know this.

                                                        But even if we accept that the statement is false on its face, professional cook’s equipment is, in fact, harder to use. A stainless steel pan is harder to use than a home cook’s non-stick. A wok burner is harder to use than the burners on a typical stove. A Hobart silcer or stand mixer is much more dangerous and capable than a mandoline slicer or Kitchen Aid mixer. The list goes on.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          The line that I quoted states a fact that is false.

                                                          You are generalizing “tools” to “equipment”. That you can think of many tools for cooks that are more complicated does not make it true for all cases.

                                                          Professional-grade pots, pans, knives, spatulas, forks, stoves, extractor hoods, mixers are all things which I don’t consider more complicated than the amateur-grade equivalents. The same goes for most sporting gear and instruments.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    Mentions Facebook as Thrift’s only notable user but certainly Twitter is another one. Not quite sure if Pinterest still has Thrift speaking services, but they used to a few years ago.

                                                    1. 4

                                                      Airbnb also uses Thrift. Claiming no one outside of FB uses Thrift seems pretty uninformed…

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Thanks to you both, added!

                                                      2. 1

                                                        My company has legacy services in Thrift. The main cons vs. gRPC/Protobuffers are:

                                                        • no streaming RPC; messages have to be read fully into memory on the server before processing can begin
                                                        • no authentication built into the protocol, no good way to do access control or access logging

                                                        The main advantage over Protobuffers is that in Thrift, exceptions are part of the typed RPC IDL, and then form part of the API. This is nicer than setting and checking gRPC context status codes and string details.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          no streaming RPC; messages have to be read fully into memory on the server before processing can begin no authentication built into the protocol, no good way to do access control or access logging

                                                          The section about Thrift gets one major thing right: “Apache is the tragic junkyard of open source projects”.

                                                          Both of the issues you point out above are solved problems for Thrift at FB either integral to the protocol (e.g. streaming) or via the environment (e.g. mutual TLS authentication for point-to-point and CATs for end-to-end, contextual authentication)

                                                      1. 7

                                                        “Here is a gallery of whimsy and examples of people making life harder for everyone else.”

                                                        Please just use semver and don’t fuck about.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          At least one of the tools mentioned is an application (Knuth’s), and semver only makes sense within the context of a library. Funnily enough, the versioning schemes for TeX and MetaFont are the direct inspiration for my own application versioning scheme, “goldver”, based on asymptotically approaching phi as new versions are released.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I’d love to hear why you feel this way. Without the cursing, though :).

                                                            1. 7

                                                              Sure. :)

                                                              Quite some time ago I did game development with friends, and one of the nice things about the C/C++ libraries we used was that they pretty well followed semantic versioning. Patch numbers were bugfixes, minor numbers were additions, major numbers meant all bets were off and we really should check the release notes. This made it really, really easy to keep our deps up to date.

                                                              Unfortunately, web development norms seem to be frequently v0.yolo.whatever with no real attempt to provide consistent, reliable APIs. For URL API routes, this is kinda forgivable, but for libraries it really isn’t. In the true fashion of web development, it seems that in some circles (arguably this article included) this lack of rigor is not only tolerated but actively encouraged!

                                                              1. 6

                                                                I’m pretty sure this article is satire. It’s pretty well written and funny once you realize that.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I wish it was satire….

                                                                  But I have seen enough heat and steam and no light has been generated on version numbers to say……

                                                                  … I settle for a sha256 and be done.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    Evidence:

                                                                    (notice the circular definition!)

                                                                    What ever happens, not everyone will understand your intentions, possibly your genius will not be recognized within your lifetime

                                                                    it’s 100% satire

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      In $CURRENT_YEAR, I no longer trust anything to be satire.

                                                                      Even things that are satire are held up by people who treat them as good-faith truth.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        You’re not deep enough into The Dilbert Zone (cue ominous music).

                                                                        Do you realize the teeth gnashing and meetings caused by hard coding limits on number of digits in version numbers in multiple systems?

                                                                        ie. Meetings caused by running out of numbers.

                                                                        This article isn’t satire… it isn’t nearly ridiculous enough.

                                                              2. 1

                                                                What do you do when a semver lies?

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  Well, since we know what should be going on, we can flag it and report it for future issues.

                                                                2. 0

                                                                  Speaking of making life harder, what the heck is that font

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  This was long, but I loved basically every moment, and the payoff at the end, where a library drawing into a graphical framebuffer gets hot reloaded every time a buildable program is saved to disk, is amazing. Be sure to check out the YouTube demo that shows more of what you can do there, if only by writing bytes into memory that represents color channels of a grid of pixels.

                                                                  1. 8

                                                                    Honestly, it’s probably easier to fork a new process with the updated library, devise a fast serialization mechanism for your data, ship it from the old process to the new, then cutover to the new.

                                                                    For some value of easy, of course.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      If I remember correctly this is how xmonad handles configuration changes.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        I’ve thought about using Cap’n Proto for that.

                                                                      1. 23

                                                                        I like seeing that the poster is the author; it means that they’ll be able to respond to comments and questions in a highly informed way.

                                                                        1. 9

                                                                          If you have the original book in PDF form, this version is a pretty serious upgrade: modern C++, fixed typos, and code represented as text instead of images, meaning you can scale it up and still read it (reading the original on my high DPI laptop was a little bit of a squint).

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I hate to be that guy, because this thread very much feels like an emacs safe space, but I’ll go ahead anyway.

                                                                            I’d always run Emacs as a daemon (server) and I’d connect this daemon from multiple instances of emacsclient. This was both elegant and efficient

                                                                            I’m sorry, but that does not sound elegant or efficient to me. emacs is the only editor I’m aware of that’s so slow you have to run it as service to keep it snappy. That’s the exact opposite of efficient.

                                                                            Speaking of which, how is it possible after all these years that there’s no other lisp centred editor out there with any significant user base besides emacs? Is it really that hard to write? Or are people that commited to keeping emacs around?

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              I’m sorry, but that does not sound elegant or efficient to me

                                                                              Emacs optimises for user efficiency, not computer efficiency.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                The daemon is to allow a start-from-scratch to happen only once, which can take a few seconds. After that, new instances launch instantly.

                                                                                It has nothing to do with how snappy it is in interactive use as an editor. But it that regard, it’s also snappy.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  The daemon is to allow a start-from-scratch to happen only once, which can take a few seconds. After that, new instances launch instantly. It has nothing to do with how snappy it is in interactive use as an editor.

                                                                                  Right. I understand that. Even with that clarification I maintain my position.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    I guess you’ve never used IntelliJ or VSCode or anything based on Electron, just to name a few?

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      Used them? Yes. I’ve tried Atom, and intelliJ. I’ve used PyCharm and Eclipse at work. I have vscode installed on my work laptop presently. But I would never call myself a user of them.

                                                                                      Those are designed to be IDEs though. While they are slow, intellij especially, they are a different category of software.

                                                                                      Apples to apples. Compare Emacs to Vim, kakoune, nano, vi, Ed, or xi. All start fairly instantly regardless of your configuration and none require you to have a service run in the background.

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        To get it out of the way first – I’d guess that most emacs users would gladly accept a snappier version of emacs, both in terms of startup time, and in terms of packages that don’t slow down the user experience. There are plenty of projects aiming to make emacs faster in one way or another. But I think that to set one’s focus solely on performance will always miss the point as to why people pick emacs in the first place. Or put another way, if performance is your #1 feature in an editor, then emacs is probably not for you. I think emacs users love their editor despite its performance issues.

                                                                                        Compare Emacs to Vim, kakoune, nano, vi, Ed, or xi.

                                                                                        Yeah, so I’d never compare emacs to any of these editors, except for maybe vim given its decent - if not ergonomic - extensibility. The only similarities I can think of between emacs and these other editors are that they’re either both old, or were initially designed to run in the terminal, or generally give the user some sort of hacker street cred.

                                                                                        To me, and to most other emacs users I’ve talk to, our “aha” moment with emacs was realizing that, more than a text editor, it’s a live-programmed computational environment with a programmable text interface. It’s actually quite a modular environment within its borders. It’s up to the user as to whether this value prop grabs them or not. The editor part of emacs turns out to really just be one part of a much broader toolchain which integrates in powerful/whimsical/confusing ways. It’s sort of a ridiculous tool, and I think that once a user decides that they like this, they end up putting up with the warts including not only performance, but inconsistent APIs, weird defaults, and other issues that are commonly found in older technologies that survive this long.

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          Yeah, I put emacs with IntelliJ and Atom; if you’re not using it as an IDE, it starts basically instantly. Maybe vi can be a valid comparison, if it’s similarly set up for all the code related business, but otherwise, your examples are outrageously invalid.

                                                                                          So yeah, your argument boils down to, “I hate emacs because it provides an easy and built in mechanism for quickly opening an advanced editor window with any files I need to edit,” so thanks for your insight!

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            I hate emacs

                                                                                            Let’s slow down here. I never said that. I never even implied it.

                                                                                            I did, however, say that it doesn’t seem fair to call having a text editor as service “efficient”. And I stand by that.

                                                                                            I also stand by my question of how there are no lisp focused competitiors to emacs. Why does vi have so many clones or vi-like competitors and emacs none? Surely I’m not the only one that thinks that’s odd.

                                                                                  2. 1

                                                                                    I actually think most editors nowadays have a client-server architecture. At the very least, vim does. From there it’s a small step to manage the server with a service manager.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    I love how far the author was able to take this idea into the land of working tools, just from the simple idea of keeping a semantic database of the code.

                                                                                    This is also the idea behind the Rust Analyzer; there’s a slightly out of date but still very informative guide. There’s a database full of entities and their relationships and meanings, and facts get updated and queried as you go. The project even describes itself as an “IDE-first compiler front-end”.

                                                                                    1. 11

                                                                                      What is he referring to when he say “underground programming world”?

                                                                                      1. 30

                                                                                        this was also asked on HN: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=23689615

                                                                                        quoting antirez:

                                                                                        Yep it’s the open source, and in general the “spontaneous” development world, that happens without big money, just for hacking. This “place” once was kinda free and not observed much. Now you can’t say anything, if you don’t respect a good practice (LOL) people yell at you on Twitter. Even saying that commenting is a good idea is a problem. Not cool.

                                                                                        1. 18

                                                                                          So true: Imagine yelling at the mason that build you a house for free.

                                                                                          Even for a paid work it would not acceptable.

                                                                                          1. 4

                                                                                            In this analogy, if you think the mason is building your house wrong, it would be right to say something to him.

                                                                                            It wouldn’t be right to yell. But given the context of people complaining on twitter, seeing yelling might just be projecting.

                                                                                          2. 8

                                                                                            Probably referring to things like this http://antirez.com/news/122

                                                                                          3. 4

                                                                                            Interesting wording.

                                                                                            I thought about using “anti-commercial” for some of my projects, but felt it would require more explanatory text around it than I care to write.

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              Maybe license it under a freeloading-corporate-hostile license [edited, was “business-hostile”], like https://licensezero.com/licenses/parity ?

                                                                                              I wrote about the reasoning to do so a while back: https://blog.joeardent.net/2017/01/say-no-to-corporate-friendly-licenses/

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                But Parity is not business-hostile, quite the contrary! A lot of the thinking behind LicenseZeros licenses, especially around prototyping and such is precisely in the license for companies. They just don’t get to use it for free.

                                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                                  I understand that’s the point, but that still means they deal with it on your terms, and you don’t need to grant any other licenses to anyone.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    Edited for clarity :)

                                                                                            1. 5

                                                                                              Honestly, point # 8 should be directly in the Rust book. And the whole article is amazing.

                                                                                              Corollary – has anyone ever explored the possibility of an editor plugin or code formatter that graphically, explicitly shows the lifetimes inferred by the compiler? (I imagine it would be much more complex than it sounds … maybe not even feasible).

                                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                                I have wanted this. If the error string can show you the borrow points, you should be able to get that data in the editor.

                                                                                              1. 6

                                                                                                Emacs is as idea that can blossom in other forms

                                                                                                https://github.com/remacs/remacs/blob/master/README.md

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  Pushing on that idea brings you to the realm of, “Tailoring your tools by programming them,” and that is something that will never go away.

                                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                                  Just FYI: stup (or shtup) is Yiddish for “[to] fuck”. This is unfortunately the first thing that came to mind when I saw the project.

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    This was a positive for me :)

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                                                                                                      Thanks for the heads up, that’s unfortunate, I didn’t know this when naming the project. As noted in the README though the name derives from the word standup. I will consider changing it.

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                                                                                                        Given that Yiddish-aware people are likely to not be a huge consumer of your product, it’s probably not that much of a concern :P stup as pronounced like standup makes a lot of sense.