1. 5

    This reminds me of the perspective of the Houyhnhnm Computing Chronicles:

    http://ngnghm.github.io/blog/2015/08/02/chapter-1-the-way-houyhnhnms-compute/

    Whereas Humans view computers as tools below them to which they give orders and that do their bidding, Houyhnhnms view computing as an interaction within a system around them that extends their consciousness. Humans articulate their plans primarily in terms of things: the logical and physical devices they build (sometimes including tools to make more tools), in the lower realms of software and hardware. Houyhnhnms weave their conversations foremost in terms of processes: the interactions they partake in, that they attempt to automate (including these conversations themselves), which always involves wetware first. In short, Humans have computer systems, Houyhnhnms have computing systems.

    There are eight or nine chapters, all worth contemplating.

    1.  

      I hadn’t run across that, what a delightful read. Sharing with friends.

      1.  

        If you’d ever run across the TUNES project (2000 - 2008-ish), these Chronicles are meant to be a retrospective: https://ngnghm.github.io/About.html

    1. 2

      Stopped reading at the casual hatred of capitalism. Can we get a philosophy article without throwing out the dog-whistle of capitalism being bad?

      1. 8

        I’ve covered the special relationship between capitalism & software extensively elsewhere. I didn’t elaborate in this article because I didn’t expect it to become popular outside my regular readership (who will already be familiar with those arguments).

        In addition to the stuff covered above, there’s the obvious precedent of cybersyn. Of course, eliminating capitalism doesn’t require eliminating markets (as cybersyn does), & despite the various problems with markets, it’s unclear whether or not doing so would even be desirable in capitalism’s absence. After all, markets can be pretty good for solving certain kinds of information problems so long as the prerequisites for market efficiency are fulfilled. On the other hand, almost all economic activity on earth occurs within corporations or families (both of which are siloed planned economies) & attempts to bring markets into corporate silos have largely been disastrous, so it’s worth considering cybersyn’s progeny seriously.

        1. 2

          Next time just link the phrase to your previous article that explains it best, so that it doesn’t appear to be a random comment.

          1. 3

            I’ve got an awful lot of other writing related to every subject I cover here. You’ll have to excuse me if I don’t link every word to a different article when tossing off a low-effort rant I expected to get at most ten readers. Criticism of capitalism is among the least controversial subjects I cover in this.

        2. 9

          What is it about the author’s dislike of capitalism that invalidates their opinions about UX design?

          1. 10

            The casual injection into a post that I was reading to find out about his opinions on UX design.

            1. 6

              it’s their article, not yours. If they think it’s important, they can write whatever they want :)

              1. 1

                It may be their article but we are allowed to critique it. Nobody’s imprisoning the author for the way he writes, but by the same token, no one is obligated to read what he wrote if the style drives them away.

                1. 3

                  Then why not just hide and ignore? How do the OP reply’s not equate to tantamount compaining and not serious discussion? what do you intend to accomplish with this reply?

                  EDIT: also, it’s funny I got downvoted as “incorrect” at the same time as your reply…

                2. -6

                  It might have made some sense with context. Now it did not.

                  A big part of capitalism is providing the supply for a demand. If something won, there’s a market demand for it, right?

                  It might be suboptimal, and change can be hard to enact, but would it be better if every computer was an autistic LISP machine, utterly unapproachable for a layman?

                  1. 4

                    Can you seriously not use “autistic” as an insult?

                    1. 3

                      ….what?

                      1. 2

                        This post includes, in five sentences, a severe misunderstanding of markets under conditions of near monopoly, some pretty extreme ableism, and the straw man fallacy.

                        Please, reconsider.

                    2. 3

                      I’m with zdsmith and the others here. It’s OK to have this as a pet peeve, but really, just put that aside and evaluate the ideas being presented for what they are. That’s my suggestion.

                  2. 14

                    It sounds to me like the OP is responding to an insufficiently-filled market need to shit on capitalism, and I commend them for responding so quickly to the invisible hand.

                    1. 5

                      Also, I don’t think you’re using the phrase “dog-whistling” correctly.

                      1. 2

                        No. Calls for the death of capitalism and the adoption of fully automated luxury space communism are all the rage these days.

                        And while I started writing this as snark, the truth is it’s a reality, especially in certain quarters like Mastodon where thousands of kids who’ve likely not experienced actual hardship ever seem to predominate.

                        1. 7

                          And while I started writing this as snark, the truth is it’s a reality, especially in certain quarters like Mastodon where thousands of kids who’ve likely not experienced actual hardship ever seem to predominate.

                          Except that the ‘kids’ you talk of have actually experienced far more hardship than any previous generation that still lives. Growing up in a massive recession, living in a world where they have no privacy and many have no expectation of privacy, where they’re allowed to own mobile phones as children despite it being objectively proven that this is incredibly harmful to their psychological development, living in a world where all collectivism in society has been snuffed out by the unstoppable march of neoliberalism.

                          If you can, imagine having your once almost guaranteed job replaced by outsourcing to Asia so the very rich who were already far too rich can make even more money. Imagine having your previously completely free tertiary education replaced with unbelievably expensive tertiary education but of far worse quality with universities filled with foreign students that waste tutor and lecturer time by being virtually unable to communicate in English. Imagine having your Government’s public works department privatised and its job of building sufficient housing to keep house prices at a reasonable level completely abandoned, leading to some of the most expensive housing in the world in a low population density first world country with more than enough land.

                          If you were in those shoes I imagine you’d consider yourself to be subject to some level of bloody hardship thank you very much.

                          1. 3

                            Except that the ‘kids’ you talk of have actually experienced far more hardship than any previous generation that still lives.

                            Do you realise that there are still survivors of the Second World War alive? Survivors of the Holocaust? Survivors of the Cultural Revolution?

                            No, millennials haven’t ‘experienced far more hardship than any previous generation that still lives,’ not even close. Not even a little bit.

                            1. 6

                              Um… Can we please not have sweeping generalizations about the life experiences of entire generations here? Or pissing contests about hardship? The hyperbole to which you are responding is severely oversaturated, but the basic point is sound. Genuine hardships exist at every level in the mythical Maslow hierarchy. Studies have shown that grad students suffer the same stress levels (measured by both Likert scale and cortisol levels) as combat soldiers. People who live through major natural disasters and other forms of severe crisis generally report feelings of peace and social communion. People adapt, it’s how our nervous systems work. Exercise some compassion!

                              1. 3

                                I guess you’ve never met any from other parts of the world who isn’t from the United States, or other other affluent and unravaged countries.

                                1. 1

                                  Did you mean to reply to milesrout? Every one of my examples of people who’ve experience far more hardship than millennials have was from outside of the United States.

                                  Or do you mean that ‘millennials’ is a term usefully applied to non-Western cohorts? I think that would be a rare usage. Still, while there’s some pretty horrific stuff going on the world today, I don’t think it compares to the Cultural Revolution or the Holocaust.

                                  1. 1

                                    I was replying to you; you brought up non-Western comparisons, and I’m pointing out that your attempt to minimize current ills is unsound.

                                    It’s undeniable that Millennials, and all other post-Boomer cohorts in the United States, have had declining opportunities and quality of life, due to structural issues related to unregulated and sociopathic economic policy and behavior (see https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-american-economy-is-rigged/). So what’s your deal? Why are you trying to gaslight us?

                                    1. 1

                                      It’s undeniable that Millennials, and all other post-Boomer cohorts in the United States, have had declining opportunities and quality of life

                                      I’m not arguing against that statement: I’m arguing against the statement ‘the ‘kids’ you talk of have actually experienced far more hardship than any previous generation that still lives.’ That statement is false, because there are generations still living which have experienced far worse hardship than the Millennials. Whatever hardship they face pales in comparison to mass slaughter, mass murder, mass starvation, mass conscription &c. &c. &c.

                                      That’s not gaslighting: it’s a simple fact.

                                      1. 0

                                        I believe it is incorrect to exclude the rest of the world in the Millennial cohort; the problems they face are global. Especially since you keep bringing up non-Western-world examples like the Cultural Revolution. And Millennials and younger are now facing down the barrels of a bunch of giant ecological cannons, and the world is turning into an authoritarian hellscape, so again, your insistence on minimizing how rightfully pissed they should be is literally incredible.

                            2. 3

                              And this is bad because?

                              1. 4

                                It’s absolutely not “bad” - did I say that?

                                No, what I said is that I see a lot of people yearning for a particular bit of societal change, and sometimes I question whether or not they appreciate the fullness of what they’re asking for.

                                1. 3

                                  In particular, I am selfishly worried that given that kind of massive, wholesale seismic shift in the way we structure our lives that basic infrastructure would fall away for a time.

                                  I’m dependent on a couple of key medications that aren’t all that common to continue existing on the prime material plane, so despite the fact that I LOVE the idea, I’m a bit cautious around what it would ACTUALLY mean to march into our glorious future with my comrades, possibly dying of dehydration along the way. (The drug I need is vasopressin replacement. Without it I dehydrate and die. Full stop.)

                                  1. 3

                                    Countries with socialised medicine do far better at providing people with medicine than those without. I struggle to see why it’d be reasonable to expect socialism to do poorly at providing medicine.

                                    1. 3

                                      Countries that have socialized medicine where a person with disorder like GP has survives are capitalist.

                                      1. 2

                                        What does that have to do with what I said?

                                        1. 1

                                          This whole branch discusses the “calls for death of capitalism”, and you mention socialized medicine as a counter argument. Now, why do you make me explain your post to yourself?

                                        2. 1

                                          Countries that have socialized medicine where a person with disorder like GP has survives are capitalist.

                                          I can’t even parse this. What are you saying? Socialized medicine is socialism. Western countries are a mix of socialized services (education, roads, trains, military) and private, market-based systems. The mix has historically shifted back and forth, and right now, we’re at an extremely capitalistic phase, and it’s too much.

                                          Capital is useful, like fire. Demanding that we worship it and asserting that capitalism is the Only Way is like demanding that firefighting be outlawed, because fire is good.

                                          1. 1

                                            Socialized medicine in socialist countries is atrociously bad. The GP would not have survived there with the kind of disorder they have. I am saying that because I lived in a poster boy socialist country with such healthcare system.

                                            All Western countries are decidedly capitalist, their economies are based on proceeds from capitalist mode of production. Back in my history class in USSR we had that political map of the world, they were marked there as such.

                                            I hope you aren’t suggesting that the USA is the only capitalist Western country, since all others have socialized healthcare of some sort.

                                            1. 1

                                              Really, you’re saying the medicine in the Netherlands, and Australia, and Canada, and Sweden, etc. is atrociously bad? Because I know for a fact that the systems there are better than in the United States.

                                              Again, socialized medicine, like socialized military or education, is socialism. All the Western democracies are a mix of socialism and capitalism.

                                              The United States is more capitalistic than the other ones; I am saying it needs to be less capitalistic than it currently is.

                                              1. 0

                                                Really, you’re saying the medicine in the Netherlands, and Australia, and Canada, and Sweden, etc. is atrociously bad?

                                                I am saying that medicine in Marxist societies was (and is) bad. There is a world of difference between socialized aspects of Sweden and Soviet socialism. They have nothing in common, nada, nilch. If you think USSR was like Sweden but just poorer and with more socialized services, no, it was nothing like it at all. In fact from that perspective Sweden is undistinguishable from the USA. I know because I’m familiar with both, and a former Prime Minister of Sweden agrees.

                                                1. 1

                                                  No one was talking about Soviet-style Marxist Communism, which we all agree was a nightmare. The argument was, “Too much has been subject to capitalism,” (which originally sprang from the OP’s note that we still have capitalism, meaning, there is still scarcity and inequality), or, “There should be more socialism,” which has nothing to do with the dysfunction in the USSR.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Fair enough. I was going off “calls for the death of capitalism” upthread, have nothing against socialized healthcare per se.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      But why does a call for moving beyond capitalism automatically invoke, “I guess you want to try something terrible, like a USSR or DPRK style nightmare?”

                                                      Capitalism, like controlled fire, is a human tool meant to bring about humane ends. When fire rages out of control and people get hurt, we put it out. When capital rages out of control and people get hurt, for some reason a lot of people get mad when you say, “Maybe common and critical needs shouldn’t be subject to market dynamics,” and I just don’t understand that reaction.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Because you hardly hear that call from anyone else than communists, and USSR/DPRK was the outcome of people giving their best to build communism.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Fully Automated Luxury Gay Space Anarcho-Communist Syndicalism does not suffer from the flaws of the attempts from 100 years ago; we will have automated labor this time ;)

                                                          Also, if you have an ounce of awareness and you live in the San Francisco area, it’s impossible to not be confronted with catastrophic failure of capitalism as a total system (meaning, attempts to provide all needs via markets).

                                                          1. 1

                                                            All kinds of societies can thrive once you remove human factor!

                                        3. 1

                                          Did you read what I read in full?

                                          In particular, I am selfishly worried that given that kind of massive, wholesale seismic shift in the way we structure our lives that basic infrastructure would fall away for a time.

                                          Of course once a fully marxist / communist society was attained medicine would be a non problem for most people, my issue is the transition. Do you actually think we could just pivot from full on rape and pillage capitalism to such a society without massive upheaval, bloodshed, and interruption of all but the simplest infrastructure services (like the manufacture and delivery of specialized medication for instance.)

                                          1. 1

                                            Of course once a fully marxist / communist society was attained medicine would be a non problem for most people

                                            Don’t count on it. We had root canals treated without anaesthetics in 1980s USSR.

                                            1. 3

                                              This is exactly the point I was trying to make. I’m seeing a LOT of people extolling the virtues of Marxist / communist societies without thinking through how hard they are to actually implement in ways that benefit the common citizen.

                                              For a really great trove of data on how this can go totally awry, read the book Red Plenty.

                                              Many then cite successful implementations of universal healthcare in socialist countries, failing to acknowledge the fact that many (all?) of these are fueled by thriving capitalist economies.

                                              I acknowledge that I am a cis white male working in technology and currently enjoying a lifestyle practically dripping with privilege, but this has not always been so, and I also feel that just because I have never known hardship (especially not the kind of hardship experienced by millennials, apparently) but that doesn’t mean I can’t talk about the flaws in people’s thinking.

                                    2. 3

                                      If you’re going to go that far you should go all the way: fully automated luxury gay space communism.

                                      1. 4

                                        Sure why not? With flying cars, even! :)

                                        (In all seriousness, Ian Banks Culture novels represent pretty much the ONLY far future society I’d actually WANT to be a citizen of :)

                                  1. 1

                                    See also this that made it to this site five or six months ago, but I can’t find the submission.

                                    https://github.com/bootandy/dust

                                    1. 2

                                      I wrote a hilariously task-specific command line utility for spitting out random floating values to stdout, and I’m going to use it to learn to use Tokio by making it multithreaded and using the evented IO model for printing.

                                      1. 3

                                        For the curious, here’s the benchmark from the title: https://github.com/cart/amethyst-bunnymark

                                        1. 1

                                          For my curiosity, I downloaded the benchmark and run it. I don’t have a GPU, so it could only keep 60fps until around 3500 sprites. By the time it got to 100k sprites, it was about 2.5 fps:

                                          99700
                                          2.595606
                                          100000
                                          2.5947073
                                          100300
                                          2.5895736
                                          100600
                                          ^C
                                          cargo run --release  1593.37s user 52.61s system 153% cpu 17:49.48 total
                                          

                                          (at least half of the total time there was compiling in release mode, just fyi)

                                          Typical stats for my machine while running it (memory was never getting scarce); it’s a Lenovo X1 Yoga 2nd gen running a 4.18.14 kernel and rustc 1.31.0-nightly (a66dc8a14 2018-10-22):

                                          cat /proc/cpuinfo |rg 'model name|cpu MHz|cache size|bogomips'
                                          model name	: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-7600U CPU @ 2.80GHz
                                          cpu MHz		: 800.014
                                          cache size	: 4096 KB
                                          bogomips	: 5808.00
                                          model name	: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-7600U CPU @ 2.80GHz
                                          cpu MHz		: 800.031
                                          cache size	: 4096 KB
                                          bogomips	: 5808.00
                                          model name	: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-7600U CPU @ 2.80GHz
                                          cpu MHz		: 800.000
                                          cache size	: 4096 KB
                                          bogomips	: 5808.00
                                          model name	: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-7600U CPU @ 2.80GHz
                                          cpu MHz		: 800.003
                                          cache size	: 4096 KB
                                          bogomips	: 5808.00
                                          

                                          In the readme, it’s claimed that a default cargo run results in a bunnymark of 3400 sprites is the max for 60fps, but that running in release mode gets you 100k@60fps. I have no idea how to reckon that without concluding that it just doesn’t use a GPU in debug mode, but I’m still curious.

                                          1. 2

                                            Some helpful statistics for you, on my own laptop with the specs of

                                            • Intel i7-6500U @ 3 GHz (another mobile i7, a generation older though) with Intel HD-520 integrated GPU
                                            • Nvidia 940M @ 1.1 GHz (discrete, although mobile gpu), 2gb of VRAM on mine (although I go nowhere near this admittedly low ceiling)
                                            • 12gb of DDR3 memory at 1600 MHz

                                            Compiled with rustc 1.13.0-nightly using a MSVC toolchain on latest Windows 10

                                            I ran using both the Intel integrated graphics and the Nvidia discrete graphics getting 15,800 bunnies with the HD-520 and 21,000 with the 940M respectively, never breaching more than 1/3 total CPU usage while the program’s running.

                                            So at this point, the ability to render so many batched instances of that sprite on your screen comes down to the bottleneck of available power on your GPU, which could also simultaneously face overhead with 3rd party or poorly supported 1st party drivers on Linux. (possible explanation for the difference between my own integrated GPU on an older generation Intel CPU outperforming your own. Intel integrated graphics are infamous in this territory, for poor drivers as well as incredibly poor performance and reliability while playing games, demanding or not.

                                            I do wish the author had their specs posted on the repo for their own results but I imagine asking them (I’ve opened an issue) they’d oblige, but I’d also imagine they’re using a dedicated desktop graphics device.

                                            1. 1

                                              Yeah, I have no doubt my hardware is being underutilized :) I appreciate the comparison you did, too; it gives me some concrete evidence of just how underutilized it is. Thank you!

                                              But I’m still not really understanding a two-orders-of-magnitude speedup gained just by more aggressively optimizing the build, as claimed in the benchmark repo.

                                              1. 1

                                                There is quite a lot of overhead introduced in Rust debug builds. Realtime applications are almost required to be ran in –release unless you’ve already found a problem and have the time to reproduce its state in debug mode. Every day using Rust is a day I wish I had a Threadripper workstation…

                                        1. 15

                                          Hot take: I love this.

                                          While it’s clear that DRH is a devout Christian (or an expert satirist), he also takes pains to mention several times that he is not putting this out in order to try to enforce Christian beliefs—or even values—in his community. He also adds, which is quite canny and also unusual, that his expectation is not that failure to comply 100% with the CoC should result in expulsion or blacklisting.

                                          But he is actually acknowledging: people have adopted Codes of Conduct for the purpose of regulating behavior within contained communities of practice for thousands of years in nearly every culture, at least any culture with any kind of monastic tradition. If we feel the sting of an unregulated community, where toxicity damages the spirits of the people we would like to contribute, why not start there?

                                          I’m afraid it will fall on deaf ears because many people—on both sides of the CoC debate—have an immediate allergy to any mention of religious practice. I hope they’re given some time to see this code put into practice.

                                          1. 10

                                            A large part of this is because organised religion in general, has a pretty fucking horrific history of treating certain groups of people terribly.

                                            In western society/culture/countries, (some parts of) Christianity has not just a history, but a current-day penchant for treating some of those same groups of people, as shitty as the law will allow them, and trying their damndest to reverse whatever protection laws do provide.

                                            I’m a straight while male, but I can see plenty of reasons why almost any demographic other than my own would take issue with using Christianity as the basis of a “treat people right” guide.

                                            Edit to clarify: it’s not just christianity that has treated groups of people like shit, but this CoC is linked heavily to Christianity and Christians do currently treat some of those same groups of people like shit.

                                            1. 3

                                              Say the same thing about muslims and you’d be shouted out of the server by hordes of “good” people.

                                              Christianity is an enormous box containing all from the Swedish (formerly state) church which professes a form of liberation theology where god is gender-neutral and no longer a “lord” as that does not sound inclusive enough to fundamentalist sects who stand next to the road with signs professing all from the end of the earth to “whatever bad happened is your own fault because you allow gay people to be gay people”. The Benedictines have been around for a while, they tend not to do the latter and are far from the former and their Rule is, if clearly religiously tainted, a usable abstraction of the monastic ideal. Software developers as a rule are not medieval monks living in poverty with a vow of obedience which makes parts of the Rule inapplicable but compared to the intersectionalist religious pamphlets which are being used by other projects this one is no worse and in many ways a lot easier on the mind because its religious intentions are so clearly stated (and as such easily ignored by those who prefer to stay away from organised religions). The whole of the thing could be compressed into “do not do unto others what you would not have done upon yourself” which gives room for future abbreviation.

                                              1. 1

                                                As I said elsewhere here and on HN, I don’t see why this CoC or any such agreement needs to be more complex than “respect people”.

                                                If someone needs it spelt out more clearly than that, do so, when the need arises.

                                                Defining such a specific list of rules (either in this or in other verbose CoC’s), is micromanaging to the ridiculous extreme. If we file a feature request, we don’t preface it with a “how to type” or “basics of $X language” handbook, because we trust that people understand those concepts on their own.

                                                1. 6

                                                  The reason is moderation, the vast majority of the rule of law in any country could be boiled down into “don’t do bad stuff,” but then when it comes to judgement who defines “bad”?

                                                  Without a CoC or Terms and Conditions by another name; moderation of large communities becomes messy, easily corrupt and non-transparent with different moderators treating people differently based upon personal preference.

                                                  With a CoC/T&C the moderation team have a set of guidelines that they must follow in their moderation duty, this gives a line in the sand that the community know they should not cross and the moderators know they should apply.

                                                  For the majority of people that line is pretty obvious without needing to read the CoC, for a select few however, they need “respect people” spelling out.

                                              2. 4

                                                Christianity in particularly

                                                Christianity has far from a monopoly on human suffering and shitty behavior. Pretty much any organized system of beliefs or tribe of sufficient population will end up with a history of treating some subset of people terribly.

                                                Please don’t be inaccurate.

                                                1. 4

                                                  You’re right. I’ll amend.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    Agree. Looking at the people acting offended, it feels that they are largely angry that SQLite didn’t pick their (corporate) religion.

                                                  2. 1

                                                    In western society/culture/countries, (some parts of) Christianity has not just a history, but a current-day penchant for treating some of those same groups of people, as shitty as the law will allow them, and trying their damndest to reverse whatever protection laws do provide.

                                                    But that has nothing to do with Christianity. If those people happened to have a different religion they wouldn’t be different people, they’d just do nasty things for other reasons.

                                                    Countries where other religions have historically dominated are no different in terms of whether they have abusive practices or whether they have bigotry. And it’s pretty obvious from the wide variety of different types of Christianity practiced in different places, from Sweden to Subsaharan Africa, that the culture and socioeconomic status of people is what determines their behaviour, and religion is just an excuse to be nice or an excuse to be nasty, not the cause of nicety or nastyness.

                                                    1. -1

                                                      Edit to clarify: it’s not just christianity that has treated groups of people like shit, but this CoC is linked heavily to Christianity and Christians do currently treat some of those same groups of people like shit.

                                                      Yes, and so do the intersectional feminists who push for entirely-serious codes of conduct. Publishing this explicitly-Christian CoC, even if the author was sincere about valuing the rules of the Benedictines as a way of ordering human communities, has the satirical effect of making the feminist codes of conduct seem not all that different from the codes of conduct of a competing religious tradition.

                                                      1. [Comment removed by moderator pushcx: I appreciate that you didn't personally insult someone this time, but flaming is also pretty awful.]

                                                        1. 1

                                                          A little less ad-hominem would go a long way here. I don’t see anything worth being ashamed of in that comment, nor do I sense the presence of horse shit and believe me, I know horse shit given that there’s a herd of the creatures roaming our farm. Intersectionality and third-wave feminism are doctrines which do have a lot in common with organised religions even though they (mostly) lack transcendental elements.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            As I said privately to a mod, the comment I replied to is using “intersectional feminism” as an ad hominem slur, which is garbage.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Woah, let me be clear. I’m not using “intersectional feminism” as a slur. I’m using it in eactly the same sense as the parent post used “Christianity” - namely, as the name of an ideology with political implications, with which I disagree. I think CoCs in software projects were originally a specifically intersectional feminist political project (until people with other political ideologies started creating their own compering CoCs, as the SQLite people are here), and I entirely reject your claim that my naming of “intersectional feminism” as the motivating ideology of CoC-proponents constitutes a slur.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                Then I retract my statement, partially. Your equivalence between the power and influence of social progressives vs. organized religion, particularly modern Western Christianity (which is fairly far away from the theology of Benedict), is still grossly incorrect.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  “Intersectional feminism” is no more an ideology than “Proust scholarship” is an ideology. If you relax the definition of ideology to the point that it admits those cases, it ceases to be a useful word. Consequently, this post principally serves to demonstrate your downward-punching biases; not a good look.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Also, you don’t make a great case for yourself when you say, “I’m just equating it to something commonly regarded in this context as shitty and saying I don’t like it, I’m not using it as a slur.”

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      ““I’m just equating it to something commonly regarded in this context as shitty and saying I don’t like it”

                                                                      Yes. This is exactly what I am doing. I am deliberately comparing intersectional feminism to Christianity, precisely because Christianity is “commonly regarded in this context as shitty”. No one claimed that the grandparent post’s comments about Christianity or criticizing the satirical SQLite CoC for being explicitly Christian constituted a slur. I don’t think they constitute a slur either. I claim that my comments about intersectional feminism and intersectional feminist-based CoCs are of exactly the same character as the grandparents’ are about Christianity, and are not slurs either.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        I charitably submit that you’re intentionally obtuse about what “slur” means.

                                                        2. 8

                                                          I agree. I think the Rule of St Benedict is interesting, but this is real magic:

                                                          However, those who wish to participate in the SQLite community, either by commenting on the public mailing lists or by contributing patches or suggestions or in any other way, are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that honors the overarching spirit of the rule, even if they disagree with specific details. Polite and professional discussion is always welcomed, from anyone.

                                                        1. -10

                                                          People’s poor financial discipline is why employers have power over you. If you have fuck you money, then you can just quit and find another job.

                                                          The fact that you can’t just quit is why employers have power because they can afford to end the relationship but you can not.

                                                          If you used your money to buy a holiday in the Caribbean then you don’t have it to buy your freedom.

                                                          1. 31

                                                            I have fuck you money. Not lots of it, but enough that I managed to bring my boss to the table and get a raise and a promotion out of it.

                                                            However, virtually none of that money was acquired by my merit: I got it by selling the house my father left for me and my two sisters. I’m a clear example of how fuck you money is, in the overwhelming majority of cases, a privilege, not the result of merit.

                                                            But there are other kinds of privilege, more subtle ones, that amount to the same. We’re you able to study without having to work to provide for yourself or your family? We’re your parents college educated? Did they encouraged you to go to college? Do you have students loans? Do you have a safety net you can fall back to if shit goes wrong?

                                                            All of these things are essential in acquiring fuck you money. None of them are your merit. None of them are things you worked hard for. They’re all accidents of birth. A.K.A., privilege.

                                                            Is it impossible to get fuck you money without those things? Surely not. But it’s much, much harder.

                                                            So, tldr: don’t blame people for not getting through hard work something that, most people that have it, got it through accident of birth.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              That can be valid at the beginning, getting exploited in pay the first few jobs but then it boils down to people’s negotiation skills and confidence.

                                                              I negotiated hard my very first gig while I know people who still don’t ask for a little more when getting their 20th contract.

                                                              That’s why I find it silly when people say that certain people are just bound to make less, if you don’t negotiate when people need your expertise then when are you going to do it? And if you don’t then who’s to blame the employer if he gives you exactly what you are seemingly ok with?

                                                              1. 4

                                                                This is a simplification of a very complex subject. Pay gaps, be it gender, race, social class, or whatever other line, is a complex, multi-factored issue. It can not be explained away by “if you’re getting paid less is because you deserve less”.

                                                                This is the kind of question where, honestly, your experience is kind of irrelevant (and so is mine. You can argue that I’m contradicting myself, because I used my own case in the first comment, but in my defense, I was posing myself as a counterpoint to an idealized example of someone who acquired fuck you money through pure merit, so, I was trying to point that individual cases don’t matter in this question, generic trends do). Great, you negotiated well your first job. Good for you, but a) you’re likely overlooking your own privilege and b) you’re a single data point. For every one of you, good negotiator person, I can probably find 20 that got continually fucked over by factors beyond their control and found themselves unable to negotiate pretty much anything.

                                                                And finally, yes, employers are almost always the part to blame, because they have more power. It’s like sexual assault. A boss can’t claim a employee consented in being foundled daily if the alternative was being fired. Employers hold the power, so it’s their responsibility to not take unfair advantage of employees. If conditions are setup in a way that creates incentives to employers to be unfair, than we need government and employee organization to step in a guarantee that employers are not dicks.

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  Employers hold the power

                                                                  They do control the means of production and leave us to sell our labor for a wage. But the power is ours for the taking, if we decide to take it.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    Fair enough. My country is on the verge of electing a homophobic racist buffoon that openly supports torture and the return of a military dictatorship, though, so you can understand why I don’t place much hope in a popular uprising.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Brazil?

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Shit, I’ll be really sad if you’re not from Brazil yourself. But yes, Brazil.

                                                            2. 17

                                                              Spoken like someone who has never known poverty!

                                                              Am I having poor financial discipline when all my wisdom teeth got impacted and infected simultaneously and I have to choose between keeping my hard-earned savings and not having a mouth? I have ten false teeth through no fault of my own. Should I have thrown away my ability to chew solid food to keep “my freedom” instead? I guess I could drink Soylent for the rest of my life!

                                                              1. [Comment removed by moderator pushcx: Please don't make personal attacks like this. I saw alynpost commented already, but this is the kind of rhetoric that's just not acceptable to leave up.]

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  Respectfully, please do not engage in personal attacks on lobste.rs.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    Thank you for the clarification, and I shall abide.

                                                                  2. 3

                                                                    Disrespectfully: fuck off, troll. This is hot garbage, and has no place anywhere.

                                                                    cc @pushcx Is this acceptable discourse for this web site?

                                                                    1. 5

                                                                      The comment it is replying to is far less respectful, albeit somewhat more polite. Why didn’t you ping a sysop about that one?

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Why would I ask a question to which I already know the answer?

                                                                      2. 2

                                                                        I don’t think it should be, but sometimes, you have to take an uncomfortably strong stand against bad ideologues.

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                                                                          I don’t care what you do or how you justify your actions. I care about what kind of discourse is tolerated on this particular web site, which is why I asked @pushcx and not you.

                                                                          Basically, if we can be assholes to each other on the basis of whether one happens to view the other as a “bad ideologue,” then I’d like to know.

                                                                    2. 2

                                                                      Yup, that’s why people don’t have fuck you money. Because of all the Caribbean holidays they buy.

                                                                      /s

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Not a company, but an example of using ML/AI to de-spam the FCC Net Neutrality comments (surprise surprise, all the humans supported keeping the regulation): https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/files/blogs/FilteringOutTheBotsUniqueNetNeutralityComments.pdf

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        Website of the org that wrote it: https://alephzero.org/, which is pretty light on content, and doesn’t include any source.

                                                                        I wish I could see a more direct comparison with PARSEC, which is also leaderless and asynchronous byzantine fault tolerant: https://medium.com/safenetwork/parsec-a-paradigm-shift-for-asynchronous-and-permissionless-consensus-e312d721f9d8 and has been under active public development for a while (https://github.com/maidsafe/parsec) and posted here four months ago: https://lobste.rs/s/hlpkom/protocol_for_asynchronous_reliable

                                                                          1. -2

                                                                            As a result, there’s no need for Proof-of-Work consensus, which means that Dat and P2P aren’t inherently wasteful.

                                                                            As great as the work that Paul does is, it’s really hard for me to sometimes take him seriously when he writes stuff like this. I really do not understand why he needs to do that. It’s not true, and it only detracts from his message.

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                                                                              What part of that is untrue, and how? Dat is not based on any expensive operation, and proof of work is wasteful.

                                                                              1. -2

                                                                                The part about proof-of-work being wasteful is untrue. Something is only wasteful when it’s brought in comparison to something else that is less wasteful. If you consider proof-of-work to be wasteful, you’ll have to point to a more efficient system that accomplishes what Bitcoin does. I know of no such system.

                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                  If you consider proof-of-work to be wasteful, you’ll have to point to a more efficient system that accomplishes what Bitcoin does. I know of no such system.

                                                                                  How about solving any other problem than reverse-hashing? There is absolutely no utility in finding a hash starting with n “0”‘s. Sure, it would be more complicated, maybe not as elegant on first glance, but I don’t see why it shouldn’t be possible.

                                                                                  1. 0

                                                                                    Do you think you’re the first person to ask that question?

                                                                                    I would answer your question but there’s little point. I’ll just get downvoted for sharing what I’ve learned over the years with you. So figure it out yourself.

                                                                                    1. 0

                                                                                      I don’t understand why you assume that I think I’m the first person to think of this. All I know is that it’s not commonly discussed, for some reason. And secondly, why care so much about imaginary Internet points – that’s really not something that should influence what you say or don’t say. Other than that, my profile has a link to my contact page, so I’d be trilled if you could tell me more about what you know.

                                                                                  2. 2

                                                                                    I assume you mean reaching consensus on a global scale without having to trust a central authority?

                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                      *without having to trust more than 1) the leaders of the largest hashpools 2) the developers of the system.

                                                                                      1. 0

                                                                                        Such a system as the one you described does not exist, and in Bitcoin trust for all of the above is minimized across all of those entities (in other words, it’s spread out, not concentrated in any one of them).

                                                                                    2. -4

                                                                                      ok

                                                                                      you’ll come around eventually, i trust.

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                                                                                        I (strongly) disagree with itistoday on this topic, but there is zero place here for your behavior.

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                                                                                          Why is it acceptable to just walk in, say something facile and dubious, then back that up with an ungrounded statement of opinion? My counter-argument was appropriately rigorous, not to mention hopefully optimistic for the future of their character and wisdom.

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                                                                                            He’s wrong (imo) that distributed trust is a particularly important outcome.

                                                                                            From that (imo incorrect) base, he’s got a perfectly good argument. There isn’t really a better way to do it yet.

                                                                                            Rather than making a serious attempt to understand him, you’ve resorted to condescension. Put a bit more effort in.

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              In isolation, that’s totally fair.

                                                                                              In the context of bitcoin-worshipping ancaps, it gets a little tedious. He also took it as self-evident that whatever it was about Bitcoin he meant was understood, after the condescending, “marginal efficiency is relative,” line, after which he* probably had to wipe his monitor clean of spittle because his internal monologue came roaring out via unconscious and unintelligible lateral lisp.

                                                                                              So why does he deserve the respect, time, and effort?

                                                                                              *) given a “he” pronoun because, come on.

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                                                                                                He doesn’t deserve your time and effort - you didn’t have to respond.

                                                                                                You chose to spend your time and effort on an answer, but not your respect. That’s what has no place here.

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                                                                                                  A point well made, that I concede.

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                                                                                    As someone who wrote both a P2P system and a cryptocurrency, I would say that P2P and PoW are orthogonal to each other. You can imagine a centralized system which accepts data which has a PoW, and you can imagine a P2P system that synchronizes data without PoW. Where he is wrong is comparing them as though they solve the same problems.

                                                                                    The consensus algorithm in what people call PoW cryptocurrencies isn’t the PoW, but the idea that the longest chain wins. PoW just slows the process down so that block generation happens at a specific fixed interval (10 minutes for bitcoin for example) on average. PoW is about making the blockchain a decentralized clock. This is why Satoshi Nakamoto in the original bitcoin whitepaper called it a timestamp server (a clock). One way to make a decentralized clock in a P2P system without PoW is to use vector clocks, which have their own problems and costs.

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                                                                                    Huh, who would have thought that YouTube actually is as bad as it’s frontpage makes it look?

                                                                                    1. 10

                                                                                      Honestly I’m pleasantly surprised that it wasn’t just a bunch of racist conspiracy videos…

                                                                                      1. 9

                                                                                        We’re not the target demographic of Youtube. 14-year-olds are.

                                                                                        Therefore, the Youtube front page is filled with content for 14 year olds :)

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          My YouTube front page is filled with awesome shit that I want to watch pretty much 100% of the time. It’s all open source robotics and RC planes and weird tiny houses and computer science lectures.

                                                                                        2. 7

                                                                                          I’m not saying the internet used to go be better…but projects like this give compelling evidence.

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                                                                                            Hehe… precisely the reason I held off launching this. If you filter for smaller channels, the content is slightly better. The site needs more seeding though, so please submit videos from your favorite small channels! Right now it just pulls data from the largest 5000 channels plus other channels random incoming google traffic has submitted.

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                                                                                              It would be interesting to see what the frontpage looked like if youtube used this algorithm to populate the frontpage. Of course this is just a reflection of the crappy way youtube currently promotes content to users.

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                                                                                                Of course this is just a reflection of the crappy way youtube currently promotes content to users.

                                                                                                To some extent that is correct but I think a lot of it has to do with clickbaiting as well, for which youtube’s promotion algorithm isn’t directly responsible. All the top videos are very clickbaiting / highly saturated.

                                                                                            2. 2

                                                                                              Perhaps, but I think it’s worth noting that there would be feedback loops on Lobste.rs rankings that wouldn’t be present in this ranking: If something is popular on Lobste.rs, it being on the front page would bring in more votes. Here we’re ranking things based on what’s visible and popular on YouTube: an objective ranking of a process that is nothing objective.

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              There are a ton of great points in here for people who want to make a difference in the world, and Julia is super inspiring and engaging as always. One of the ones that stood out was a tweet by @bcrypt that observed that software development was one area where there’s a lot of interesting low-hanging fruit to be plucked by amateurs who put in the time to do the work of understanding the domain:

                                                                                              https://twitter.com/bcrypt/status/985252050081427456?lang=en

                                                                                              1. 9

                                                                                                Something to consider is that the feeling of being an imposter could also be the fault of a toxic work culture; the OP alludes to that by calling out the “real programmer syndrome”.

                                                                                                This piece points out that “syndrome” implies the fault is within the individual having an imposter experience, and causes people to not consider the structural issues that contribute to poor mental health: https://qz.com/work/1286549/imposter-syndrome-lets-toxic-work-culture-off-the-hook/

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                                                                                                  “One of the psychologists that coined imposter syndrome, Dr. Pauline R. Clance, once said that she wishes she called it ‘imposter experience.’” I love this.

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    Nightmare-level on-call rotations definitely add fuel to the fire of “real programmer syndrome.” You’re not only expected to stay up all night for an entire week, but you’re supposed to recount your war stories in a way that makes you sound like the hero.

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                                                                                                    This might be a stupid question, but why not less instead of cat? Cat is not really meant to display files but to concatenate them. I’d definitely like a better pager, but neither w3m or vi in view mode worked for me, so i’m still using less

                                                                                                    1. 5

                                                                                                      Cat is still cat. Bat is like the kitchen sink that just clobbers more? Yeah, I don’t quite understand why this tool is positioning itself relative to cat.

                                                                                                      It is definitely not a clone. But I am all for new, more usable terminal based tools that use what we have at our disposal, more cores, more ram, ssd read/write.

                                                                                                      I’d really like a tool that built an n-gram inverted index of all files below my current dir and allowed me to jump to anything, that showed similar token/phrases/lines, etc. All terminal driven, with an option to load a rich GUI over a local http connection.

                                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                                        Although I agree with you, I can see why this would be positioned as an alternative to cat.

                                                                                                        Quite a lot of people use cat to preview files, and that’s what bat does. I know less and more exist, but for some reason I still find myself using cat. Perhaps other people do the same.

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                                                                                                          I use cat because, if I’m lucky, the output will fit in my terminal, and I’m ready for my next command; with a pager, I need to press a key to exit out of the pager before I can issue my next command, and the output disappears (in the case of less) as if the pager never ran, so I can’t keep context around.

                                                                                                          1. 11

                                                                                                            By the way, less can be configured to act well in these circumstances. I have more as an alias for less -FX. Those two options to less are:

                                                                                                                   -F or --quit-if-one-screen
                                                                                                                          Causes less to automatically exit if the entire file can be displayed on the first screen.
                                                                                                                   -X or --no-init
                                                                                                                          Disables sending the termcap initialization and deinitialization strings to the terminal.  This is sometimes desirable if the deinitialization string does something unnecessary, like clearing the screen.
                                                                                                            

                                                                                                            I also define $PAGER to be less -FX, so manpages and the like don’t clear the screen once the pager quits.

                                                                                                            1. 5

                                                                                                              I second this. -c would be helpful in $PAGER as well so that everything above on your screen stays untouched.

                                                                                                              Personally, I’ve been rolling with this:

                                                                                                              $ type le
                                                                                                              le is an alias for 'less -FcmNqX --follow-name'
                                                                                                              
                                                                                                            2. 2

                                                                                                              the output disappears (in the case of less) as if the pager never ran, so I can’t keep context around.

                                                                                                              If you want to get rid of this sort of behaviour globally, disable “alternate screen” in your terminal.

                                                                                                              In tmux, set-window-option -g alternate-screen off. In putty there’s Disable switching to alternate terminal screen under Terminal → Features.

                                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                                Just tested bat, and the output doesn’t disappear. When you need a specific section from a file (not the whole thing) - using bat over cat and not less makes sense. Neat.

                                                                                                            3. 2

                                                                                                              Bat will act like cat if it determines there is no tty. Thus, bat is like less when used interactive and like cat when scripting.

                                                                                                              Like someone else said, people use cat to dump contents to the terminal so they can refer to it while continuing work.

                                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                                Proof!

                                                                                                                Oh.. you can also use it to concatenate files 😉. Whenever bat detects a non-interactive terminal, it will fall back to printing the plain file contents.

                                                                                                            1. 8

                                                                                                              If we can collectively reject awful hiring practices, we all win. Employers already have most of the power in this relationship, so we need to band together and consider how each of our individual actions affect the community as a whole.

                                                                                                              I think maybe this has been done before, to great effect (eg, the forty-hour work week, etc.).

                                                                                                              1. [Comment removed by author]

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                                                                                                                  You must be lucky to live in a place where it’s cheap to keep your belly full and a roof over your head, and where programmers command such high pay, and has tons of places to work, in lots of different professions! If that weren’t so, you wouldn’t be so glib about leaving and going somewhere better. In fact, if such a place didn’t actually exist, you’d look like a heartless and uninformed child, which can’t be true, or else you youldn’t be here. So I’m probably missing something that unifies and resolves this apparent contradiction. Maybe you just forgot about how hard it is to pay rent in Silicon Valley without an SV salary, or what it’s like to have a partner with different skills and needs, or have children or family or community that would be devastating to leave behind.

                                                                                                                  You claim that the members of the labor pool for programmers is already more powerful, individually, than the members of the capital pool, and therefore, it is not worthwhile to unionize. Maybe you’re right, which is maybe why the capital members have taken it upon themselves to organize collectively against labor. But why would you want to wait until you were desperate before you organized to realize your strength? Why wouldn’t you want to strengthen your position even more, especially when vastly more powerful forces will inevitably organize against you?

                                                                                                                  You’ve also characterized the alternative to “leaving and going somewhere better” in a very strange and passive way: “sit around and hope a union will come along and fix things for you”. I’d ask for clarity on how you think unions actually work, and what kind of dynamic they would introduce to the labor market, but I suspect there wouldn’t be much coherence. Instead, I’ll just point out that “sitting around and waiting” to be saved by a union is an odd thing to do after pointing out that there are no relevant unions.

                                                                                                                  Anyway, enjoy your coding challenges and unpaid overtime and no vacation accrual and equity that you can’t afford to exercise!

                                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                                    I deleted my comment because after I posted it, I realized that since you hadn’t specifically mentioned unions and figured it was out of line for me to go assuming you meant unions. But since it’s very clear now you were, for the benefit of other readers, the main point I made was that I literally can’t imagine a profession least in need of unions than software developers.

                                                                                                                    You must be lucky to live in a place where it’s cheap to keep your belly full and a roof over your head, and where programmers command such high pay, and has tons of places to work, in lots of different professions! If that weren’t so, you wouldn’t be so glib about leaving and going somewhere better.

                                                                                                                    I do live in such a place, I live in the US where even the poorest of the poor have better living conditions than half the world. I should have qualified my statements by saying that they apply mainly to western countries. I understand that in other parts of the world opportunity is not as easy to come by no matter what your skill set. If that’s the case for you, then it’s possible my comments don’t apply to you and unions might be necessary where you are.

                                                                                                                    Maybe you just forgot about how hard it is to pay rent in Silicon Valley without an SV salary, or what it’s like to have a partner with different skills and needs, or have children or family or community that would be devastating to leave behind.

                                                                                                                    There’s always the option to leave Silicon Valley. There are a lot of famous companies with headquarters there but the Valley does not in any way have a monopoly on tech jobs.

                                                                                                                    Yes, I do have a partner with different skills to myself and we have children. I have already made one major move to get out of a shitty job and into a better one. And I would happily do it again if I had to.

                                                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                                                      But since it’s very clear now you were, for the benefit of other readers, the main point I made was that I literally can’t imagine a profession least in need of unions than software developers.

                                                                                                                      Really? I don’t think doctors need a union either, but they have the AMA. Lawyers have the ABA. Other engineering professions have their professional societies. No, these aren’t formal unions, and they don’t have collective bargaining rights, but they do fulfill many of the same functions that unions fulfill for “blue-collar” workers.

                                                                                                                      In fact, the more I look around at other professions, the stranger I think it is that programmers don’t have a union or professional organization.

                                                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                                                        I do find the argument that you can just uproot your whole life and move somewhere else with better work conditions to be extremely weak. People shouldn’t be put in a position to consider this a valid option in the first place. People have relatives, friends, children who need a stable environment, even just things they are used to and feel comfortable with.

                                                                                                                        Consider how you might have come about that way of thinking, and who it really benefits to have people willing to do this, from a broader perspective.

                                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                                          I do live in such a place, I live in the US where even the poorest of the poor have better living conditions than half the world.

                                                                                                                          Therefore, there is no place for unions in the US? P.S.: you have just admitted you don’t live in such a place.

                                                                                                                          There’s always the option to leave Silicon Valley. There are a lot of famous companies with headquarters there but the Valley does not in any way have a monopoly on tech jobs.

                                                                                                                          It, along with the other areas with a monopsonistic local labor market (Seattle, New York to a lessor extent), does have a near exclusive lock on the disproportionately large salaries you mention as an intrinsic benefit of being a member of that industry, and all those places are very expensive to live in. Some people might get lucky by living some place cheap while working remotely and getting paid with SV/Seattle/NY wages, but compared to the total number of jobs, that number is low.

                                                                                                                          Yes, I do have a partner with different skills to myself and we have children. I have already made one major move to get out of a shitty job and into a better one. And I would happily do it again if I had to.

                                                                                                                          How great for you! I’m sure it wasn’t a huge pain and you’d not put down any roots (kids making friends at school, etc.) and everyone was happier for having done so. That’s fantastic, and I’m not even being insincere, because even if it were true, it wouldn’t support the argument that it is, in general, easy and painless to do, and that reasonable people shouldn’t desire to not have to do that.

                                                                                                                          You have not presented any argument against unions other than, “I don’t think we need them because the costs currently imposed on us by capital are either low enough that I don’t mind, or I’m somehow not paying them because I’ve been lucky or something.” Why are you so against the idea?

                                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                                            I essentially agree about not uprooting, but the point about kids and school is probably a bit off. We considered it an argument for not changing countries. We also considered the problems kids (which we didn’t have at the time) would have integrating if we moved back. But a friend - a teacher of young children - set the record straight: Kids make new friends.

                                                                                                                            The biggest nope here is girls around puberty. They can be the worst psychological bullies, even deciding in advance to hate the new girl the teacher talked about.

                                                                                                                            With kids and a career, you don’t necessarily see your friends very often, at least IME. Moving should be such an upgrade that you can travel to see your friends about as often as you would otherwise.

                                                                                                                            Just something to keep in mind when considering a big move. We didn’t move for other reasons, at least not yet.

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                                                                                                                                I generally don’t do PDFs on the phone, but the middle link makes a good point about the age at which to move. I’m also quite sure that moving a lot can be detrimental. But moving like once at a less fragile age shouldn’t wreck the kid.

                                                                                                                                Same as what I’ve heard about divorces and relationships. There are ages when you should keep the facade going.

                                                                                                                    2. 1

                                                                                                                      Reading the title and this comment, you might conclude, “coding challenges are awful hiring practice” and get on with your day.

                                                                                                                      Don’t do this, the article is about how coding challenges can be improved and what prospective employees should expect out of employers who use them.

                                                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                                                      Besides the probable-bug-in-the-code angle, an interesting aspect of this to me is that the whole dispute takes place in pretty non-exotic material: water cooled to between -20 and -40 C (albeit very pure water). I guess it’s not surprising that there are plenty of unanswered questions in that kind of material too, I’m just more used to these popular writeups of physics disputes being about material that you find only in distant galaxies or supercolliders.

                                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                                        The trick is that it’s extremely pure water with no nucleation sites. That’s more of a theoretical thing. In all real water samples a little bit of bacteria or something causes the water to freeze before the interesting transition happens.

                                                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                                                          Below the homogeneous nucleation temperature, it crystalizes almost instantly, even if it’s perfectly pure.

                                                                                                                      1. 8

                                                                                                                        The piece links to this post, which is a fascinating deep dive into the implementation and bug fix/enhancement of a vector datatype meant to be especially performant in cases where its length is small (SmallVec), but was actually slower and unsound (remedied by the post’s author for both ills):

                                                                                                                        http://troubles.md/posts/improving-smallvec/

                                                                                                                        I don’t really understand the “and why you shouldn’t care” part of the title; there’s never another reference to why you shouldn’t care.

                                                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                                                          I think the “why you shouldn’t care” was in reference to Vec being just as fast in most use cases.

                                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                                            I can maybe see that, but when all was said and done, SmallVec was faster than Vec in the case that it was small enough and used such that it could be allocated on the stack, which was the motivating use case for its existence. That seems like something I would care about, if I had cared to try to optimize my code by using SmallVec instead of Vec. Its disadvantage over Vec in an application would likely be hard to localize without specific microbenchmarks, I’m betting, so the fact that it was counterproductive could easily have slipped by even if attention was being paid to performance overall.

                                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                                              I guess the very last sentences support your conclusion (“If you’re using smallvec for its performance benefits, it’s worth benchmarking your program using Vec with Vec::with_capacity instead. Usually the simpler implementation is the faster one.”) but I still think the headline is sub-optimal; you have to care enough to benchmark still! Regardless, the piece overall (as well as the OP) is still pretty great.

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                                                                                                                          Author buries the lede here a bit in that the dopeness of the associated t-shirt is completely unmentioned in the title.

                                                                                                                          https://teespring.com/shop/undefined-behavior-shirt

                                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                                            That shirt is awesome! Might even trick programmers that see it into learning to avoid it. They Google it but find no rainbows. ;)

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                                                                                                                            This shows that if you randomly got, say, 0.2, it would get pushed to near 0.6. But if you got something close to 1, it won’t go past 1. In other words, this changes the distribution from uniform to… exponential? This is something I’m still unclear on.

                                                                                                                            No, it follows a power law, most likely approximating a Pareto distribution. What about it makes the author think it’s exponential?

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                                                                                                                              Author here: brain worms? Lack of training in probability and statistics? I went through a LOT of reading new-to-me things in the course of trying to figure all this out.

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                                                                                                                                Oh no I totally get that. My comment seems rather judge-y, I’m sorry if I came off that way. I admittedly learned an awful lot from reading your post, and I actually read up on the distribution you presented only after reading your article.

                                                                                                                                It appears similar to an exponential distribution on first sight from what I recall. It’s a lot harder to tell the difference when we’re restricted to such a limited section of the distribution.

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                                                                                                                                  No worries! I had tried chasing down a Pareto-style function to make the correct distribution, but the relations among the parameters didn’t fit the constraints. But I was still unsure what to call the final, correct distribution, hence the question mark and caveat about my clarity :)