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      +1, although I recommend the Type-S variant.

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        Yes, I have the original at home, and I tried to bring it into the office, and my co-workers wanted to kill me. I ended up getting a type-S variant for the office and keeping my other one at home. I absolutely love this keyboard!

      2. 3

        I have multiple keyboards, but my favorite for working is a Topre Realforce 87u which uses similar switches, while also giving arrow keys.

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          My favourite variant is Drop’s Tokyo 60

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            I can second this. I recently got the Tokyo60 and have been absolutely loving it.

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              I want to see what you’re talking about but everything I click on there wants my email address.

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                Sorry, for some reason drop requires an account to view products. I’ll link you an image instead.

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              I use this keyboard for work and absolutely love it. I’m grateful CTRL is in the CAPS LOCK position.

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                I’m currently typing this from a Happy Hacking Keyboard Pro 2, and I enjoy it for the most part. But I do miss the lack of physical arrow keys.

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                  I used an HHKB Lite2 for years and years (over a decade, I believe): it has an inverted-T in the lower right. They are an odd rectangular shape, which I imagine is why I have never seen a mechanical keyboard with the same feature. I thought it was basically the perfect layout for a long time.

                  An under-appreciated feature is the placement of the ESC, \, ~ and BS keys. Once you’re used to it, you really don’t want to go back.

                  There are only one and a half problems with the HHKB. The first is the CTRL key. Yes, replacing Caps Lock with something useful is good, and yes that location is far better than way out on the left and right corners. But it is not ideal for touch-typing, in which one should press modifiers with the opposite hand.

                  The second half-problem is the staggered key layout. I believe that a non-staggered (‘ortholinear’) layout may be more ergonomic.

                  These days I am experimenting with the Boardwalk and XD75 layouts, but with heavy inspiration from the HHKB. I have Hyper, Super (GUI or ‘Windows’), Alt, Ctrl, Raise to the left of the space bar and Lower, Ctrl, Alt, Super & Hyper to the right. The Caps Lock location is used for Compose — since it is not a modifier, having a single version is okay.

                  For arrow keys on the Boardwalk I have Lower+EDSF (like WASD, but fingers never leave the home position). On the XD75 the arrow is in the centre.

                  I know for a fact that I do not want to go back to a full-size board with a keypad, and I know I want to stick with mechanical keyswitches. I may someday want to get into something even more ergonomic, such as a split keyboard or Ergodox.

                2. 1

                  I have used this, as well as a Realforce 87U, for a few years each. Both are great but these days I prefer the Leopold FC660C (with Type-S switches). Specifically with the Hasu PCB Mod, which is also available for the HHKB2, one can turn the board into the custom tool of programmers’ dreams.

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                    Does anyone find value on missing the F keys or the arrow keys?

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                      the form factor being small has value, because it means the device takes up less physical space on your desk and is much more portable. It’s very easy to toss into a bag with a laptop, because it’s only going to be as wide as the laptop itself.

                      The problem with the missing arrow keys is that in order to use the arrow keys you have to use a chorded combination (with the fn key to the right of the right shift). That’s fine when you’re using the arrows on their own, and the key combos are easy to learn and remember and use. Where it falls down is when you want to use the arrow keys and press other keys simultaneously that do NOT want the fn key held down, which is a struggle for games that use arrow keys. That’s the only situation in which I’ve found it bothersome, but that may be more of an issue for me than most since I’m a game developer.

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                        I personally use a fullsize + ten-key WASD v2, which is pretty good. The whole tiny keyboard thing (people are unironically making 40% size boards on /r/mechanicalkeyboards) makes very little sense to me.

                        I miss my old huge compaq keyboard, with F13-F24 on a strip down the left side :)

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                      I do this with Emacs and org-mode. I have one dedicated file - journal.org, and I create an entry per day. Despite ‘setup’ and configuration costs (which isn’t really that bad if you look at getting started with Spacemacs or Doom-Emacs), I’ve yet to come across anything that’s as frictionless whilst at the same time retaining the ultimate in flexibility.

                      It might be worth a look at org-journal, but personally I’ve found the above to be pretty much all I need.

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                        Another +1 for org-mode. I keep an inbox.org that has a top level heading for each day. So it might look something like this.

                        * March 19 - Tuesday
                        ** 1:1 w/ boss
                         - some 1:1 notes
                         - more notes
                        *** TODO a task from the 1:1
                        ** A coding task [ 0 / 3 ]
                        - [ ] write the code
                        - [ ] write the tests
                        - [ ] make a PR
                        

                        org-mode has built in tools to manage the TODO items and the checkboxes for you. You can pull a list of all todos, or see what things were checked off what days. The check boxes give a nice overview when the subtasks are folded. All of this gets folded up by org-mode so I can see a nice summary of the day without needing to dig into each sub item.

                        1. 3

                          org-mode has built in tools to manage the TODO items and the checkboxes for you.

                          The dates, too: ‘C-c .’ AKA ‘org-time-stamp’ inserts <2019-03-19 Tue> and S-leftarrow goes back one day, etc.

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                            I do this exact same thing. One top-level item for each day.

                          2. 4

                            Same here with org-mode, but I also have a capture template that allows me to create a journal entry from anywhere with very little effort.

                            The following in my emacs config file allows me to type C-c c j to open a buffer where I can record my entry, which then gets saved to ~/org/journal.org under the Journal heading.

                            (global-set-key (kbd "C-c c") 'org-capture)
                             (setq org-capture-templates
                                   '(("j" "Journal" entry (file+olp+datetree "~/org/journal.org" "Journal")
                                      "* %?\n  %i\n  %a\n")))
                            

                            Emacs capture templates

                            1. 2

                              I do this as well. I have a file: labbook.org with one entry per day. For me I was getting lost trying to come up with good methods of organizing my content (todo.org, $project.org, $person.org) and finally decided to simplify with chronological ordering.

                              1. 1

                                If you’re an emacs person org-mode is hard to beat. It’s outlining features are without peer near as I can tell. It’s one of the things I miss about emacs.

                                1. 2

                                  Even if you don’t use Emacs for anything else, what stops you from using it for Org? Your comment reads a bit to me like “If you’re a Java person, Minecraft is a pretty fun game”.

                                  1. 1

                                    Because I came to realize that much of Org’s power, much like the rest of emacs’s power, is more than I need and ends up being a bright shiny distraction that I end up futzing with endlessly rather than actually getting work done :)

                                    Plain old Markdown files have served me very well for work stuff, and Evernote for personal stuff.

                              1. 4

                                A (non-free) alternative I’ve been using quite happily for a while now is Deckset. Same kind of idea, write your presentation using Markdown with some idiosyncrasies and then Deckset can apply a number of themes. Works well.

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                                  Woah, thanks for that. Great find.

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                                  Ah, fonts - short of color schemes and ultimately editor (if you aren’t using acme-colors.vim you can go to hell), the best argument we can have. And this is a cool way to visualize them.

                                  When I use a monospace font I’ve been a long-time M+ 1m user, and am glad to see it represented up there.

                                  I’m really interested in OCR A Extended, though. I just tried it and It’s exceptionally readable at small sizes - unsurprisingly, I guess, given the need for it to be unambiguous for the purpose at hand. if I can make it a bit thinner (a la M+ 1m), bump the kerning up and maybe add a few fillips like a slash in the zero I may have The Ultimate Font. Does anyone have experience in font editing? That’s a dark art I’ve never looked at…

                                  1. 7

                                    Nothing brightens up my morning’s coffee quite like seeing a couple of posts on here or HN regarding fonts ;) I do like starting my day off with a worthwhile bit of yak-shaving.

                                    Personally though I always come back to PragmataPro. It’s extraordinarily well featured and looks great at almost all sizes and resolutions.

                                  1. 2

                                    It’s not free, but Operator Mono SSm is my personal favorite.

                                    1. 1

                                      I ran this for a few weeks and the novelty of it soon wore off. I like that it has some personality (specifically the italics) but really didn’t find it especially pleasant to use.

                                      1. 1

                                        I do like the look of it, but the price is rather high - $199 for a single computer. Yikes! For $20 I’d be tempted, but not at that price.

                                      1. 3

                                        Now to wait for the sidebar patch to be finished for 1.6…

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                                          Good news - the neomutt project has you covered.

                                          1. 2

                                            Wow - did not know about that one. Thanks. Looks good!

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                                          I’m surprised to see a “design” type foundry make a typeface and talk about using it as a UI font for development, since their primary market (and their price-point) is aimed at selling to design shops that need to buy one or two weights of some niche thing for a project and then never use it again. Most developer fonts are “system” fonts, paid for by a corporation and given away as part of a larger thing (Lucida Console, Monaco, Bitstream Vera Sans Mono, Droid Mono, Source Code Pro), or hobbyist typographers giving away their work for free (Inconsolata, Envy Code R, Monoid).

                                          The only other instance I know of where a “design” type foundry released a “developer”-oriented typeface is Input and even then developers are allowed to use it as a UI font for free.

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                                            There’s also venerable (yet often overlooked) PragmataPro.

                                            Hoefler’s font looks great, I’d love to give it ago but that price does indeed seem to miss the mark for their intended audience.

                                            1. 1

                                              LOL I thought it was 200 euro for the one font, when it’s a whole family of fonts. PHEW. You can get just one for like 20 bucks, they really should remove the 200 as the default, scary as fuck.

                                            2. 3

                                              That absolutely explains the price point.

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                                              I love this series, and have all of them. Highly recommend datasette and Com Truise.

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                                                +1 for Com Truise. All of his stuff is great, although of particular interest to this demographic is his ‘Komputer Cast’ podcast series.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Thanks! Not sure how that happened actually, given I clicked the button to grab the title from the URL.

                                                1. 2

                                                  If people are interested in ARM development, DataCentred in the UK have virtualised AArch64 instances available on their OpenStack public cloud: http://www.datacentred.co.uk/datacentred-world-first-openstack-public-cloud-on-64-bit-arm-servers/

                                                  Full disclosure: I work for DataCentred.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Is is possible to get free/cheap access for Open Source projects? I’d be interested.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Yup, absolutely. Shoot me a message with some details.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      I’ve found this to be very useful for crafting a ‘handsome’ resume from a bit of Markdown.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        That (currently) redirects to a 404 on Github. I’m guessing it was supposed to end up here: https://github.com/rsms/sol

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Github Pages were down for a few. The link should be working again.