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    I keep all code inside ~/src sorted by theme. And search file system with Alfred to open projects in VS Code or cd quickly to folder in iTerm.

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      Can anybody tell me how to disable the “preview tab” state, where you click on something once in the explorer (or more importantly open it with cmd-p), and it opens but in a “preview” tab that will be replaced? Or better yet, I’d like to promote “preview” tabs (I’m probably using the wrong term here) into real tabs once you’ve had it open and/or focused for a few minutes?

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        I haven’t figured out how to disable, but I did learn double click opens for real. Now I use lame open on purpose for files I just want to preview.

        I wish the function was reversed.

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          You can disable “preview” mode entirely with this setting:

          "workbench.editor.enablePreview": false
          

          …or just from Quick Open with this one:

          "workbench.editor.enablePreviewFromQuickOpen": false
          
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          If you save the file (cmd+s) it will make the tab permanent. If I understand what you meant.

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            That’s a useful trick I need to keep in mind, chur.

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              Saving works—there’s also a command to just keep the file open named “View: Keep Editor” (workbench.action.keepEditor). The default keyboard shortcut is ⌘K Enter.

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            I’ve disables preview, it’s annoying (see other comments for details). As for “promoting” you can double click on the tab to do that.

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            Thanks for the article, I updated my list of interesting cli tools

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              For longer goals (1 month or 3+ months) I use a Trello board named Focus.

              For daily tasks I use 2Do and GitHub issues.

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                Will try build an alfred workflow to search and read Pocket articles in Go & AwGo.

                Basically rewrite this workflow in python and make it fast. Plus add some features I need.

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                  My list of software I use daily is Karabiner, Alfred, VSCode, iTerm on mac amongst other tools. And Tweetbot, 2Do, Telegram, Overcast on iOS.

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                    I use a tool called Focus to block out websites likes front pages of lobster, HN, Twitter to not be accessible during ‘focus’ time. Only on breaks can I view news and let myself be distracted. Having a system in place that allows this to happen is great.

                    I also don’t listen to music but listen to fire sounds when trying to focus. On mac I use Noizio and on iOS I use Dark Noise.

                    https://wiki.nikitavoloboev.xyz/focusing

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                      Thanks for your advice ! I do too listen to white noises or ASMR when I want to focus on something, but not when the tasks require deep intellecual process.

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                        Going to try rewrite https://github.com/flipxfx/sVim for new Safari so I can use it on macOS Catalina.

                        Safari is unusable for me without that extension.

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                          Not to add any pressure, but I look forward to the result. ;)

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                          I organize my file system a bit differently. Everything is accessed from Alfred and Repos Workflow.

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                            I quite like your organisation structure.

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                            I can attest to the importance of reflecting on life in form of some kind of diary.

                            I’ve been journalling for a bit over 4 years. Initially through cards I got as a present and later digital day evaluations.

                            And now I journal online: https://wiki.nikitavoloboev.xyz/looking-back

                            Mostly as a way to reflect on where I was in my life at any given time and gain appreciation for where I am now. For example I was quite depressed studying in university but have I not put those thoughts in writing, I wouldn’t have more proof to this little fact that nothing is permanent in life and everything goes away. Journalling helps me be present and mindful of the moment. And it lets me flex my writing skills and my ability to express how I feel and think.

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                              I’ve been using Monokai Night theme for VS Code and been in love with it from the first look. So much that I ported the look to all other code apps I use.

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                                I do like Monokai :D It’s a good, classic theme. The “Night” part makes it really pop too!

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                                  I used to use Monokai all the time, but I’d gone back to just using the default dark themes for VS and VSCode. I think I might give this a run, though.

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                                    Same here. it’s pretty nice tho. going to port it to Intellij as well

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                                  Working on a habit to read at least one hour of books before going to bed.

                                  As for books, I am going to be working through this list.

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                                    Great post. I tackle the problem of being aware of things I don’t yet know or fully understand by maintaining an open Trello board that lists topics I want to learn in a visual way.

                                    I then mark off topics I am focusing on learning now and topics I want to learn ‘Next’. This helps me greatly. I also try to learn things in context of projects I am working on and the direct knowledge I need to solve the problems I have.

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                                      How do you keep track of things that you find interesting but you shouldn’t dig deeper?

                                      I used to use a system like yours (including the Trello board), but I started to notice I like everything but I don’t have to know everything. Still, I have the problem to “prune the tree of knowledge” I want to acquire.

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                                        I keep all things I find interesting and I know in my wiki. It has over 700 topics and growing.

                                        https://wiki.nikitavoloboev.xyz

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                                      Been thinking about learning Clojure and ClojureScript. As I am tired of all the abstractions in JS/TS and web land in general. I want something simpler and with better tooling like Clojure REPL.

                                      Will see how it goes. I know lobsters has quite a few people who are into clojure so it’s gotta worth trying it out.

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                                        Also checkout FRP, particularly Reflex-DOM or Miso (or Elm if you prefer not to step into the awesome world of Haskell).

                                        1. 2

                                          I started reading Clojure for the Brave which was actually an excellent resource for learning Clojure.

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                                          Working on Learn Anything.

                                          We had an awesome designer join us recently who made new mockups for how the new version of the website should look like. Now it’s on us to implement it and iron out all the UX details. It’s pretty exciting. ✨

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                                            I’ve heard some people raving about tiddly wiki for this which seems like it has a lot of flexible interfaces. I don’t share my notes publicly as often, but I take tons of notes, and I almost always have this tui mind map that I wrote open in a tmux pane.

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                                              Why don’t you share your notes publicly? I think there is so much value to be had if everyone shared their notes in public.

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                                                I have a lot of personal info in there that I don’t need to share. But I am often thinking “I should be writing more for public consumption” and I also started making a gitbook, with sort of a long plan of turning it into a sort of “designing data intensive applications” but with an eye toward actually building the underlying infrastructure that supports data intensive applications. Sort of a missing guide for modern database and distributed systems implementation. But it’s been hard for me to overcome the friction of really building a durable habit of writing for others.

                                                1. 5

                                                  That’s the cool thing about a wiki. You write the notes for yourself. Just share it with others.

                                                  Would love to read your book. I’d release it gradually too as the topic of building the infrastructure for data intensive apps is vast.

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                                                    Not to discourage you from writing, because I do believe that there’s always room for new takes on a topic, but Martin Kleppman’s Designing Data-Intensive Applications may be of interest to you, if you haven’t seen it. I’m not sure that it goes into “underlying infrastructure”, as you’re thinking, though.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      I love that book! I want to do something similar but targeting people building infrastructure instead of the applications on top.

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                                                        Gotcha. That sounds useful, though I’d think less evergreen because the technology on which the infrastructure is built will keep changing.

                                                        I’ve seen a lot about the virtues of event sourcing, but a lot less about how one implements event sourcing at different scales. Am I correct that’s the kind of thing you’d dig in to?

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                                                    No software I tried supported tagging things as public or private. So I am forced to make everything private.

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                                                      Cowyo is a wiki with public and private pages. Fairly straightforward codebase.

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                                                    @icefall This void reminds me a lot of maxthink, an old DOS personal organizer (http://maxthink.com) I’ll take a deep look, thanks for sharing.

                                                    @nikivi, your gitbook is a prime. Very well crafted. I also try to keep notes on a similar structure but yours are way more strucutred.

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                                                      The simplicity that was TiddlyWiki has unfortunately been mostly lost in the name of security. It used to be a single file that you could open and edit, and everything would save automatically and transparently.

                                                      Now you have to install a browser extension for it to save correctly, which makes TiddlyWiki much harder to transfer between browsers.

                                                      Edit: I’m not taking sides on the security-functionality tradeoff, to forestall any off-topic discussion. However, TiddlyWiki has been along a looooong time (at least 10 years) now, and I assume that this would mean the Wiki portion of the software is superb.

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                                                      Writing a DSL to easily describe keyboard modifications. Currently targeted at Karabiner.

                                                      Code: https://github.com/nikitavoloboev/karabiner-generator

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                                                        I’m Nikita. I am a big fan of macOS, automation and tools in general so my blog mostly focuses on how you can get the best out of macOS and the various tooling that surrounds it.

                                                        Link: https://medium.com/@nikitavoloboev

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                                                          Will try finish writing my DSL for updating Karabiner configuration.

                                                          Recently posted a thread on keyboards here on Lobsters and it’s awesome to see so many keyboard lovers out there. I was quite upset to see so few people customizing their keyboards so I hope to change that soon.