1. 3

    I’ve been very happy with this layout: http://www.keyboard-layout-editor.com/#/gists/cd5dbe9fdf697150ed10f0d14963ca7d

    The blue key is a compose key, for things like é, ç, etc.

    I like it a lot. That said, it took a lot of iterating though in order to have things like :=, =>, or even -> not be a complex chord to type. It’s easy to optimize for one thing at the expense of others, but over time I’m happy with the chords I ended up with. I’ve developed a sort of stress test whenever I decide to make changes.

    1. 2

      One change I have to make and haven’t yet is to add a ‘caps lock’ or ‘insert’ key: the built in screen reader on Windows is activated with either one of those. I’m leaning to using lshift + rshift.

      1. 1

        will have a look

      1. 24

        Copy paste is still horribly ‘broken’. I guess <Cmd>C isn’t a thing on Linux and <Ctrl>C has a different meaning in terminals, so I can get with that. And I guess there are tricky/valid historical reasons for having two different clipboards, but for the end user, it’s just shit not being able to copy in one app and paste in the next if you closed the former.

        I’ve moved between Windows, Linux, and macOS in my career with enough time to really get used to each, and the mac approach of using cmd for UI shortcuts is just a superior choice for this reason. It pains me that this isn’t possible in Linux.

        1. 6

          Haiku (and, I suppose, BeOS back in the days when I did not even have a computer) went in the right-ish direction of using Alt for everything GUI. It’s sad to see Linux GUIs to be influenced by Windows so much.

          1. 6

            Another added benefit of using cmd for UI shortcuts is that it frees up the control key for Emacs style shortcuts. The fact that macOS supports these out of the box is one of my favorite features.

            1. 11

              MacOS also makes it easy to remap Control to the correct key position (aka the so-called “caps lock” key, which has inexplicable prominence on most modern keyboards).

              1. 2

                The same goes for Linux (console) and ‘Linux’ (X11 etc). Keys can be remapped more or less at will, if you want to use AltGr or Alt as a ‘command’ key you’re free to do so. The main problem here is that everyone and his dog will end up using a different strategy, e.g. I use a lot of Shift-Left_Alt-X combinations for launching sessions on different hosts while those same combinations might do something totally different on your systems.

                1. 1

                  It’s not impossible on Windows either but there’s no built-in way, instead you have to hack the registry or use 3rd party tools.

              2. 5

                Even if I do say so myself, since I wrote it, I use appmodmap to dynamically remap the keyboard depending on the application. Then I can still use my Mac muscle memory on a Mac keyboard with my Talos II.

                https://github.com/classilla/appmodmap

                1. 1

                  How’re you finding the Talos II? I laugh when I see “a price that won’t break the bank” on their site, but I still desperately covet one.

                  1. 2

                    Well, yes, the sticker shock, but I like it a lot. Very little is missing of what I need a computer to do, performance is well within the Intel ballpark, and it satisfies my personal goals of more owner control and materially supporting viable alternatives to x86.

              3. 3

                It pains me that this isn’t possible in Linux.

                This is possible, the WM I use (i3, and now sway) supports setting a modifier key. IIRC the default is the ‘windows’ key.

                Linux is the kernel, and there are a lot of desktop environments and window managers that run on Linux…

                1. 0

                  People say “Linux” to mean much more than the kernel. Don’t be That Guy.

                  I’ve been using Linux for 20 years, trust me it ain’t that simple. Yes you can set some nonzero percentage of UI shortcuts to use another modifier, but it will not be comprehensive. There will always be one more thing that doesn’t behave correctly, death by a thousand papercuts. Linux is simply not capable of making a sweeping change like this in a comprehensive way.

                  1. 3

                    What you refer to as “That Guy” is, in fact, “GNU/That Guy”…

                    1. 2

                      People say “Linux” to mean much more than the kernel. Don’t be That Guy.

                      Sure, but if you make ridiculous generalizations like “Linux cannot do XYZ”, then you need to be more specific about the userspace you used… because most of the time XYZ can be accomplished on a Linux-based userspace.

                      Linux is simply not capable of making a sweeping change like this in a comprehensive way.

                      I disagree. This is a userspace problem, and if the right person were motivated to solve it, it could be solved in some UI toolkit, etc. Will all distros adopt it? Who cares, there are different distros that are all different for a reason.

                      1. 1

                        you need to be more specific about the userspace you used

                        No, I don’t because it literally doesn’t matter. The fact that there are a multitude of UI systems to choose from, that don’t share a unified system of configuration, is the crux of the problem. There is no way to enforce any HIG standard in a Linux UI.

                        I disagree. This is a userspace problem, and if the right person were motivated to solve it, it could be solved in some UI toolkit, etc.

                        Great, what about all the other toolkits? How are you going to generalize this solution to work with all graphical programs?

                        You don’t. It’s fundamentally impossible on Linux.

                  2. 2

                    Select with left mouse button, paste by clicking the mouse wheel. No keyboard needed.

                    1. 3

                      The point OP is making is not that it’s easy to copy and paste, but that in macOS you have two “layers” of keyboard shortcuts. Most application shortcuts will use Command (Cmd+C to copy, Cmd+C to paste, Cmd+T to open a new tab, Cmd+A to select all, etc), leaving Control to give text commands (Ctrl+A to go to the beginning of the line, Ctrl+E to go to the end, etc, just like in Emacs).

                      In theory, this should also be possible on Windows and Linux by using Control and Alt, but in these OS almost all shortcuts use Control, reducing the amount of key combinations that an application can use as shortcuts.

                      1. 1

                        Many window manager allow defining and using extra modifier keys.

                        On a side note, modifier keys are proven to be slower than sequential keypress sequences and also more difficult to remember.

                      2. 2

                        A keyboard is very often much faster and accurate than a mouse.

                        1. 1

                          Not necessarily, with the obvious exception that literally typing is certainly faster with a real keyboard than an on-screen keyboard, but the task of choosing an option is probably always faster on a mouse.

                          1. 1

                            We’ve done a cool $50 million of R & D on the Apple Human Interface.

                            The original Ask Tog piece was published on 1989, and the quoted study may have been done some time before that. It needs to be asked how relevant that study is, especially when that study can’t be either found or replicated.

                            Further, it is unclear whether the quoted study address the improvement when user performs the same action multiple times as to make it a finger memory.

                            Here is a more recent study (2014), which shows that keyboards are fastest for often used commands while toolbars are better for infrequently used ones.

                      3. 1

                        FWIW I think it will be. With Canonical & Redhat saying “Gnome is THE desktop” I think you’ll see better across the board integration of things like this.

                        I don’t love that they chose Gnome (KDE fan :) but I AM happy they chose a horse. Maybe if they can make Gnome better enough, I’ll stop caring :)

                        1. 1

                          I hope you’re right, but I’ve been using GNOME since the 1.x days and I’m not holding my breath.

                          1. 1

                            It’s a matter of money and man hours, that’s why I think things will change for the better. Open source is not free. It takes go juice to evolve in positive ways.

                        2. 1

                          The USB HID standard actually provides (see https://www.usb.org/sites/default/files/documents/hut1_12v2.pdf, search for “Keyboard Copy”) for a usage code that means copy (and friends). So you could in theory create a keyboard that has shortcuts for copy/cut/paste, universally.

                          I say in theory because I have no idea if all operating systems handle it properly.

                          1. 1

                            I actually have an old Sun Microsystems keyboard that has separate keys for cut, copy, paste etc.

                            here’s a picture of a similar one (though not identical to mine close enough) https://duckduckgo.com/?q=sun+microsostems+keyboard&t=ffab&iax=images&ia=images&iai=http%3A%2F%2Fxahlee.info%2Fkbd%2Fi%2Fkb%2Fsun_keyboard_left.jpg )

                            doesn’t work great on Windows though. it works, just not amazingly.

                            1. 3

                              Wow, that’s wild. It even has a button for giving folks props on forums. Sweet!

                              1. 1

                                wait, how can it work less than completely? Does it copy and not paste? copy only sometimes?

                                1. 2

                                  I worded that poorly, the extra keys require a separate driver install on Windows or they will do absolutely nothing. On Linux at least the key presses are forwarded to programs, even if they don’t know how to interpret them.

                          1. 5

                            Best: I joined a startup in the early days. Not so early that there’s was nothing to talk about (I was employee number 50-something (big sales team)), but early enough that there was a lot going on daily, so any standard onboarding documentation would’ve been useless.

                            I was given a 30ish minute ultra-fast-paced stream of consciousness brain dump by a fueled-up ADD-type jack-of-all-trades developer. Zero fluff. Oddly enough, this is exactly what works for me. It was a great fit. I did worry about other people though.

                            Worst: Microsoft. There’s a lot to like here, but seriously, almost nothing works on day one. I also have never worked for another similarly sized company, so I have no basis for comparison.

                            1. 3

                              In an old sysadmin life, I learned to put a /BIG ballast file on all servers, so as to have something to quickly recover from this problem while looking for a more permanent solution.

                              Of course, this was from the days in which each server had a clever name, and I could count them, etc.

                              1. 14

                                $

                                (I put the host in front only over ssh. Any other info goes in the terminal title)

                                1. 6

                                  This. More specifically PS1=”\$ “ (that is “$ “ for users and “# “ for root). Colors disabled.

                                1. 2

                                  Heh. If I had a nickel for every team I’ve seen rewrite a codebase they didn’t understand without realizing that the main reason the new one is easier to “get” was going through the process… I’d have like 25 cents.

                                  1. 2

                                    Subversion used to have a webdav mode that auto committed on save. There’s also this: https://stackoverflow.com/a/420172

                                    1. 2

                                      Fun fact: Microsoft is now shipping a 9p server and client with WSL 2.

                                      I wonder if that makes the 9p the most popular technology coming out of the plan 9 project.

                                      1. 6

                                        It seems to me that UTF-8 is a better candidate in that contest.

                                        1. 1

                                          Oh yeah, miles ahead. I had forgotten that Plan 9 was behind UTF-8, thanks :)

                                        2. 1

                                          Even prior to WSL 2. It already works to show Linux files on the Windows UI.

                                          In WSL2 they added the other direction.

                                        1. 3

                                          The bi-directional 9P filesystem interop setup makes me wonder if there is a way to expose 9P support on the windows side for other user filesystem drivers. This could be a great feature for powerusers.

                                          1. 3

                                            Hells yeah. I’m going to try and find out tomorrow.

                                            1. 2

                                              Shocking, I totally forgot about this.

                                              I inquired further today, and unfortunately no, it’s not possible to register a random process as a 9P service.

                                          1. 10

                                            Does this mean we’re gravitating towards a de facto Linux monoculture? As much as I’m happy it’s based on a GPL kernel, I’m also feeling a kind of sadness over reduction of diversity… Even though Windows was already really more or less POSIX-like, at least compared to some OSes from earlier days. Now, apart from fringe/research/hobby OSes (though these cannot be completely ignored, fortunately), the only thing I can think of that feels like it may reasonably flirt with the mainstream would probably be Fuchsia?

                                            1. 13

                                              GuixSD on GNU Hurd or bust.

                                              1. 7

                                                I don’t think we will see Windows go by the wayside, we will see POSIX go.

                                                I think what we will see will be a birth of LINUX as the defacto cross-platform standard. SmartOS did it(linux compat) ,FreeBSD did it(linux compat) and Windows did it (WSL). All the cloud/VM vendors stop at Linux compat, and maybe windows compat. Occasionally one will specialize for macOS as well(parallels comes to mind), but most basically stop at Linux support.

                                                Sure, the FreeBSD one isn’t all caught up to 4.19 standards, but neither was WSL1. SmartOS mostly is caught up. WSL2 will be caught up, and likely stay that way.

                                                I think this isn’t really a note against the WSL1 approach so much as they didn’t want to spend so many resources babysitting the linux changelog, which tends to be massive. WSL2 should make handling the linux changelog much, much easier…. one hopes :)

                                                I’m not sure I’m personally in favor of POSIX dying, but I think that’s the future here. Linux compat won.

                                                1. 3

                                                  The NT kernel is not going anywhere. They’re just shipping a papered-over VM + a patched Linux kernel with Windows.

                                                  1. 6

                                                    In theory yes; but I seen an argument here and there that “meh, it seems we don’t really have to support Windows, as it’s got WSL, so we can just keep coding only for Linux”. Extending this some time into future, I would expect the NT kernel might phase out into insignificance. (A.k.a. become commoditized, into “just a one more semi-hardware platform for Linux”.)

                                                    1. 7

                                                      Extending this some time into future, I would expect the NT kernel might phase out into insignificance

                                                      Not likely. The only reason Windows has survived into the twenty-teens is because of Microsoft’s muscling of Windows into enterprises and onto consumer PCs in the past plus a fanatical devotion to maintaining compatibility with software compiled back in the mid 1990’s. If Microsoft as a company was starting to falter under its own jurassic weight, there might be some merit to the argument as competitors (Apple) swooped in to claim the abandoned marketshare, but that’s not the case. The company is stronger than ever.

                                                      My crazy, wild, out-there prediction is that it won’t be too long before Microsoft simply starts giving away Windows to consumers. They do about a billion in revenue from consumer Windows, almost all of that via OEMs presumably. So giving it to end-users will not hurt anything but would do wonders to encourage adoption among the next generation of developers. These new coders will probably have no particular loyalty to Apple when Windows is just as good for web development now that it ships with a fully functional copy of Linux under the hood.

                                                      1. 5

                                                        As an individual developer, that’s how I feel about it. I’m not interested in developing or maintaining a Windows front end for my Mac emulator; it’s enough to know that it works in a Linux VM.

                                                        This is another instance of the same logic that gives us “We don’t need to make a native desktop app because you can use our website in a browser.” If supporting Windows by supporting Linux is cheating, then so is shipping an Electron app.

                                                        1. 4

                                                          The thing is, I don’t want nor intend to slap some quick label on it, like “cheating”. It’s just that I see some awesome advantages of the situation, as well as some maybe not so obvious …disadvantages? questions? concerns? It definitely puts me in some kind of a meditative/pensive mood, and I wanted to share those… observations? as I find them interesting, and think they may be unexpected and thought provoking to others. That’s also kinda why I tried to emphasize this less obvious side of things.

                                                        2. 4

                                                          Extending this some time into future, I would expect the NT kernel might phase out into insignificance.

                                                          I saw this sentiment on HN, too. I don’t buy it, though. The main customers of Windows kernel are consumers, businesses, and huge businesses (enterprises). Windows is superior to Linux for consumers since it has better user experience. It’s main competitors are tablets and netbooks for those who mainly use browsers. The gamers will continue to drive sales. Then, there’s workstation users like A/V who mostly split between Windows and Mac with more transitioning to Windows over time.

                                                          On business side, they basically need a lot of desktops, servers, COTS apps, and custom apps. The apps were probably built to work closely with Windows kernel since it’s path of least resistance. Lots of the Microsoft and 3rd party tech will have obscure protocols and data formats to make escape to or integration with competitors harder. That’s called intentional lock-in. Even without it, lots of the companies (esp enterprises) will have built huge stacks of software that they can’t port without risk of major losses. Microsoft keeping strong backward compatibility means choosing them is low to no risk. That rigged choice is unintentional lock-in.

                                                          Microsoft’s billions of dollars worth of lock-in to things strongly coupled with Windows kernel means it isn’t going anywhere for a while. The only thing that could negatively effect the kernel is copyright/patent reform that lets people build and sell bug-for-bug compatible implementations of any software. Then, a project like ReactOS might get massive investment from governments or companies that don’t want to be dependent on Microsoft. Meanwhile, companies are dependent and can’t afford to move, so they’ll stay on there much like they and others have on mainframes for decades. Yeah, people said all this stuff about mainframes and AS/400’s, too. Still highly profitable businesses due to lock-in.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Ah, I follow now.

                                                        3. 2

                                                          This particular development doesn’t mean that, no. That is already well underway on the ‘server’ end. Despite the relative merits of other UNIX-like OSs, the majority will use Linux. It’s down to who knows it and who you can hire. The choice is between distros.

                                                          Microsoft know this and have embraced it. .NET is now a first class citizen on Linux. Now Linux will be a first class citizen on Windows. For developers, this is excellent. Server OS running perfectly (with Docker!) alongside your workstation OS? Just brilliant. Maybe this will tempt some away from their Macs.

                                                          I was all ready to use W10 as workstation OS and thought the plans looked perfect, but the quality issues (sort but I’m not waiting for that start menu to open!) and the advertising have kept me coming back to MacOS.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            You might even say they’ve embraced and extended it…

                                                          2. 2

                                                            Does this mean we’re gravitating towards a de facto Linux monoculture?

                                                            I think the answer is yes, but I’m hoping the answer is no. Apart from competition being a good thing, I also hope the future is something based on message passing, not a traditional kernel.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              MacOS is still BSD-based.

                                                            1. 9

                                                              I’m glad they mentioned that the filesystem operations will be faster. I wish they would explain further as to how they achieved that. This was my biggest concern using WSL last year while I was working on a Magento 2 site. Serving pages was slow, DI compilation was slow, JS build scripts were slow, everything was slow.

                                                              1. 16

                                                                I’m guessing it’s probably the obvious route given the description they use – Linux gets its own block backing store like a regular VM and manages its own cache just like a regular disk, and all the ugly coherence issues are completely dodged. Nobody ever needed a 1:1 filesystem translation in the first place, and they’re too hard and/or impossible to build without suffering the woeful perf issues WSL1 had

                                                                Really sad they’re giving up on the WSL1 approach – an independent reimplementation of Linux had immense value for all kinds of reasons. Must be heartbreaking for a lot of people who worked so hard to get it to where it was

                                                                Anyone care to place wagers on how long it’ll take after release before it’s hacked to run FreeBSD? :)

                                                                1. 15

                                                                  Must be heartbreaking for a lot of people who worked so hard to get it to where it was

                                                                  I thought the same thing! I’m also a bit bummed because the current implementation makes use of the “personalities” feature of the NT kernel, whereas the new one is a VM.

                                                                  1. 10

                                                                    It is a bit of a shame indeed. Also a good example of Agile development. I suppose the initial developers thought it would be a nice way to go, so they tried it out and shipped it. I suppose they couldn’t be sure in advance that the file system would be that much slower, or that people would be that concerned about it. Now that they know that, they had to switch over to a VM to get the performance level that people demanded. Too bad, but hard to predict ahead of time.

                                                                    1. 6

                                                                      Nobody ever needed a 1:1 filesystem translation in the first place

                                                                      Honestly, that was the one reason I would find WSL interesting: seamlessly sharing data between Linux and Windows programs.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        an independent reimplementation of Linux had immense value for all kinds of reasons

                                                                        There’s nothing really stopping someone else from doing it (I encourage them to call it ENIW).

                                                                        For what it’s worth, I believe FreeBSD still has a Linux emulation layer.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          I believe SmartOS does too.

                                                                        2. 3

                                                                          Yeah this was the logical conclusion of the WSL team initially targeting ABI compatibility with Linux. Diversity of implementation would probably have had a better chance of surviving if the WSL team targeted POSIX source compatibility, like macOS. That would have given them more wiggle-room.

                                                                          That’s not to say the WSL team made the wrong decision to target ABI compatibility, they likely have different goals for their corporate customers.

                                                                          1. 6

                                                                            Their goal wasn’t an OS though, they want to use the old Mac OS X argument: you can run all your Windows programs on your Mac, so your only machine should be a Mac.

                                                                            Just swap Mac and Windows.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              If they just wanted POSIX source compatibility, they could have continued development of the POSIX subsystem / SFU. Apparently there’s something to be gained from being able to run unmodified Linux binaries (otherwise we’d just have Windows Ports). My guess is that the goal is to grow Azure – it’s likely to be a bigger revenue source than Windows in the future.

                                                                            2. 3

                                                                              Really sad they’re giving up on the WSL1 approach – an independent reimplementation of Linux had immense value for all kinds of reasons. Must be heartbreaking for a lot of people who worked so hard to get it to where it was

                                                                              It seemed like it involved a lot of kludges onto NT though - to the point it seemed the easier approach to me was refurbishing the old POSIX subsystem and making it feel modern. There was a lot of (wasted) potential there.

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                Anyone care to place wagers on how long it’ll take after release before it’s hacked to run FreeBSD? :)

                                                                                It sounds like it’s a modified Linux kernel, so it would probably also have to be a modified FreeBSD kernel.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Almost exactly 25 years ago, on January 28, 1986, Space Shuttle Challenger disintegrated seconds after lift-off. One of Edward Tufte’s most famous examples of bad charts are the ones used by engineers who argued against the launch, and who failed to convince. It’s a fascinating story, but it has one major fault: it is not true

                                                                              (from https://eagereyes.org/criticism/tufte-and-the-truth-about-the-challenger, emphasis mine)

                                                                              1. 4

                                                                                Different incidents. Challenger v. Columbia. Challenger had political pressures Columbia did not.

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                If your language represents booleans as the integers 0 and 1, you can also use this Iversonian phrase:

                                                                                (x>0)-(x<0)
                                                                                
                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                  Come on that’s just kaomoji

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    I tried to apply that with an arithmetical method.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    Worse than sleepsort?

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      As noted, it makes “progress” at every step.

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      Hehehe, I have an acmeish theme :)

                                                                                      1. 13

                                                                                        For two of my three projects, my setup is almost exactly the same.

                                                                                        Three tmux panes, holding Vim, GHCi, and an Elm compiler. I work from anywhere, and I still use a 13” MacBook Air as I have done for the better part of a decade. I have tried larger setups, but I always revert back to this. I need portability. Some developers say they need external displays for lots of screen real estate, but I actually only have one pair of eyeballs so I can’t focus on much more than what I already have.

                                                                                        Almost everything is done in nix shells. Sometimes I’ll have other tmux windows containing a psql, mutt, ssh (over nixops), redis-cli, or weechat session. My tmux status bar has a little weather widget that I made.

                                                                                        1. 9

                                                                                          Would you mind posting a non-Instagram link? I blocked Facebook services in my hosts and would love to see your desktop ;)

                                                                                          1. 8

                                                                                            I blocked Facebook services

                                                                                            Very wise :)

                                                                                            Would you mind posting a non-Instagram link?

                                                                                            Sure. Hope this works: https://imgur.com/a/Vy3gv9E

                                                                                          2. 6

                                                                                            Vim, GHCi, and an Elm compiler

                                                                                            Living the dream, I see. :D

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              I’ve come a long way from having to build everything in WordPress :)

                                                                                            2. 5

                                                                                              Battlestation that inspires Lobsters to achieve the career they love. Ten upvotes. :)

                                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                                The 13” non-retina MacBook Air is still my favourite ever laptop, even though I’ve long since moved on. My mid-2011 model is on the shelf, awaiting a fresh installation of Debian.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  But you can see the weather out the window ;)

                                                                                                1. 8

                                                                                                  Single use, tiny languages are my catnip. I actually have to keep the temptation to learn them in check.

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    If you check out the documentation section of this site there is a DSL for rolling different dice and visualizing the distributions. It’s the most niche DSL I think I’ve encountered.

                                                                                                    https://anydice.com/

                                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                                      That’s pretty interesting! Some of the basic features aren’t surprising: being able to combine dice, sequences of rolls, etc., is what I’d expect from someone making a dice-rolling DSL. But this has a whole programming language pretty clearly included too, complete with looping and function calls. It’s even seemingly DIY syntax, not exactly lifted from an existing language. I wonder what the history is. Did these features accrete over time due to being needed in modeling some specific dice-roll situations? Was it designed up front as such a full-featured DSL?

                                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                                        I don’t know what the history is, but I thought it was fascinating when I stumbled upon it. I was trying to simulate dice rolls for D&D. (What’s the distribution of 1d20s vs 2d10s? How would you do advantage/disadvantage for 2d10s? Etc.) It was very much an “everything you try to do someone else has done 100x better” situation. I was happy with my ASCII command line charts and this guy over here made an entire programming language dedicated to this one problem.

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    Control + alt + meta + shift?

                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                      Hi. Thanks for showing interest and taking time to have a look. Good question. In the default layout, that can be done with two thumbs. One thumb to the bottom left, and the other to the top right would do the trick. Then you can use the other fingers to press some other key. But of course, you can completely redesign how each input point works, so for example if there is a frequent need to press control+alt+meta+shift you could allocate a dedicated key for it.

                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                        Oh, both thumbs have the same cluster? Makes sense.

                                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                                        Currently:

                                                                                                        • the Business Model Generation
                                                                                                        • the Fine Art of Dressing With Economy
                                                                                                        • Bullshit Jobs
                                                                                                        1. 5

                                                                                                          I’m so, so afraid of reading Bullshit Jobs. Too close to home.

                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                            I’ve been working in the industry for 15 years and have only had one gig that fit the bullshit definition, though another may fit at a stretch. In Graeber’s taxonomy it was Duct Taping.

                                                                                                            Now I’ve worked at plenty of places where my job is to fix the team’s problems, I’m ok with that. Usually it comes with a side order of showing the team what behaviours cause the problems and suggesting different ways of working.

                                                                                                            In this one place, that was off the cards. They had solved all problems by hiring, so had too many people to build anything like a consistent set of values, principles and practices. They also had a toxic culture that saw anyone who was clever enough to meet “the hiring bar” as an expert software engineer who was on a god-given mission to change the world, so beyond most criticism.

                                                                                                            They hired people to build the thing, people to fix the thing, people to fix the fixes, people to find other things to fix, and so on.