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    Isn’t the reasonable solution to enforce a restrictive outbound firewall policy?

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      Indeed. That’s the obvious reasonable solution, but implementing this is predicated on reasonable expectations on things like unfettered access to the Internet via a NAT gateway. A lot of network operators simply won’t go with it, and a lot of systems administrators simply don’t want to maintain a proxy server for those times when you need/want to, e.g., download updates from the Internet.

      The only institutions I know of presently that do this are banks, and even then, not all banks do it.

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        I’ve heard of places that use “kiosk” terminals that are shared computers with full access to the internet and all the real computers are air gapped on an isolated network. Updates/downloads/information is sneaker netted to the real network via USB drive or write once CD/DVD. And of course there is “Stallman Net”.

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      I don’t exactly consider the urge to binge-watch your talks all that strange. They’re informative and delivered extremely well, and I’d easily rank you within my top five tech speakers. (And that’s not just because you’re my doppelgänger either. That just makes me want to do a tag-team talk with you sometime to troll the audience a bit. :)

      You do admit yourself—perhaps in a tone somewhat couched in self-deprecation—that you’re prone to exceedingly long tangents, but there’s a lot of technology context and history that could otherwise be lost if you didn’t lead the narrative down these metaphorical labyrinthine catacombs underneath the cathedral that you yourself helped build. Without those tangents, your talks would be markedly not Cantrillian, and I doubt you’d have earned yourself the Cantrillian Exception™ to Surge lightning talks otherwise.

      Thanks for chronicling these varied topics (even oral tradition itself!) through oral tradition. Also, you have an absolutely ceaseless capacity to impart new vocabulary with nearly every everything you do, and my non-native knowledge of English is similarly thankful.

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        I do journal about my workday, and it’s mostly to keep track of what I do from one day to the next. These days, the idea of a workday is somewhat muddled since I’m woking full-time on my own projects to bring them to profitability, so I work things into my retrospective of the day before I go to bed.

        When I most recently worked in a shop that bought into Microsoft’s groupware and office software suite, I used OneNote. I had a separate section of a notebook labeled “Retrospectives,” and I had things broken out into one page per month. On each page, I had one heading per day, and I organized things under that heading as necessary. I had this published in my Public folder on OneDrive for Business for anyone to read. For things that were particularly sensitive, I used OneNote’s built-in password protection.

        For my personal journaling, I have a gigantic org-mode document that I rotate out quarterly. The formatting is mostly the same, modulo the addition of heading levels for the year and the month as well there. For notes that are particularly sensitive, I have a separate document that is PGP-encrypted.

        I’ve kept with this habit largely because I can search through my notes from days previous and jog my memory about what I did/encountered that day. At my most recent gig, I was on-call reasonably often, and it was customary to provide a sort of post-mortem report after the shift was over and after incidents were handed off. This helped tremendously with that.