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    I’ll probably be flamed to death for this comment, but I tried the Windows and WSL for web development for a grand total of about 2 days before I threw it away and went back to plain linux.

    WSL was far slower, and I found the configuration over-complex and completely unintuitive.

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      First - Do you have disabilities that make accessibility features critical path? If not, then we have very different needs.

      Second, was it WSL 1 or WSL 2? There’s a huge difference between them in terms of perf and completeness.

      Third and by far most important - no one environment is for everyone. If I had your fully functional eyeballs I would probably be rocking a Linux desktop too and loving it, but I don’t. After spending weeks and weeks reporting the bug, beating the drum, trying to get developer eyeballs, and then finally realizing that the tiny cadre of people with enough understanding to fix the issue simply don’t have time, I realized it was time to give up and recognize that the fully open source promised land is not going to work for me :)

      Glad to hear you’ve found a toolset and environment that works for you!

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        Considering your accessibility feature needs, describe your ideal workflow ;-)

        1. 1

          Ooh. GOOD QUESTION!

          So first let me state that my biggest obstacle and hence my biggest ask is simply this:

          I need to be able to actually READ everything - text, UI elements, all of it, with my busted eyerballs.

          (Blind in one eye, 20/80 with correction in the good eye)

          So, my ideal world ask around this would be an environment where I could choose the scale/size of EVERYTHING. Text, UI widgets, all of it, and where if I DID choose a larger text/UI size all the applications wouldn’t just utterly fail in all kinds of novel ways.

          Want to guess how many times I’ve set large text and then had apps put critical bits of content or configuration BELOW the visible page with no scrollbart? You don’t have to guess, the answer is a lot :)

          That’s why key chorded full screen zoom is UTTERLY critical for me in the current real world where you can adjust text/font size if you’re lucky and then whether said adjusted size will break your apps is another thing altogether.

          In terms of actual “Workflow” my needs are very simple. Mostly, because of my low vision and slow focusing, I pretty much always keep Windows as full screen. So ideally I like to have a bunch of separate “workspaces” each tailored to a task.

          Windows does this pretty well, and so does KDE. KDE gets mad props from me for being the ONLY FLOSS desktop that has had real zooming features for many years and never left it broken unlike Gnome.

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            So all of this is covered by the mechanisms arcan already have, and how the reference DE durden uses them. Everything that is ‘native’ uses Display Density and Preferred Pt size for layouting / positioning, alas non-native clients (so the majority of them) are not as lucky. The inertia, legacy and bias from toolkits spoil much of the fun. Some override toggles may work, e.g. lying “per window” about the display density to force clients to scale rather than post-process zoom, but it is case by case. In my experience, toolkits are slightly more responsive to faked display properties than to listening to reason about font preferences.

            If you feel like indulging my curiosity further: how problematic is navigation combined with focus when you have high magnification? From my own use cases, both the ‘pan to center around current cursor’, separate ‘zoom window’ or ‘drag to pan’ are both rather distracting and breaks focus. What has worked better, for me, is:

            • keybinding for panning around in a zig-zag or button grid for “quadrants”.
            • cursor-draw/circle-to-zoom or OCR” and then a binding to reset.
            • an edge detection/edge enhancement post-processing toggle for borders (help with focus).
            • binding to autopan/zoom to region that had the largest / most recent changes.
            • zoom to eyetracker gaze point.

            I am currently experimenting with adding more text-to-speech on out-of-band signals (e.g. notifications), positional audio mixing of multiple t2s streams to handle more contents (head tracking and HRTFs for more mental “bandwidth”) and image-to-sound like translations.

            Windows does this pretty well, and so does KDE. KDE gets mad props from me for being the ONLY FLOSS desktop that has had real zooming features for many years and never left it broken unlike Gnome.

            I think the problem these two behemoths are fighting are one and the same; the mechanisms used as building blocks. They are either extremely limited (X+COMPOSE) or fractured and brittle (Wayland) where even a keypress is a full season of “murder, she wrote”. Under those constraints, to get to an ok point (half-way to what apple has in their zoom tools) is a lot of tedious work, and to keep it from breaking is thrice that.

            1. 1

              If you feel like indulging my curiosity further: how problematic is navigation combined with focus when you have high magnification? From my own use cases, both the ‘pan to center around current cursor’, separate ‘zoom window’ or ‘drag to pan’ are both rather distracting and breaks focus. What has worked better, for me, is:

              keybinding for panning around in a zig-zag or button grid for “quadrants”.
              cursor-draw/circle-to-zoom or OCR” and then a binding to reset.
              an edge detection/edge enhancement post-processing toggle for borders (help with focus).
              binding to autopan/zoom to region that had the largest / most recent changes.
              zoom to eyetracker gaze point.
              

              Dunno if you’re still reading this but I totally missed this question in an answer previously :)

              The answer is that I don’t generally have a problem with navigation when zoomed, because generally I don’t zoom to such an extent that this problem occurrs, or if it does I just zoom out a bit having already read/parsed/selected the particular problematic text/UI element/whatever.

              IMO the edge detection strategy would be the most useful because the one navigation issue I DO Sometimes have when zoomed is that apps don’t always properly detect the zoomed UI elements click zones properly so I have to zoom out, click, zoom back in again etc.

      2. 5

        WSL 1 is akin to the FreeBSD Linux ABI layer. This has good and bad points. The good point is that it’s a fully native bit of Windows: it sees the same filesystems, uses the same pipe interfaces (so you can create pipes between Windows and Linux processes and have the same performance as between a pair of Windows or Linux processes), and so on. The down sides are that it uses NTFS via a pile of filter drivers to expose POSIX semantics (which makes FS access slow) and it is always playing catch-up, with some big features not implemented (e.g. seccomp-bpf).

        WSL2 is a Linux VM with some tight integration to do things like forward pipes over Hyper-V sockets, expose the host FS as 9p-over-VMBus (which is much slower than WSL1 accessing the host FS, but the Linux-native FS is just a Hyper-V block device formatted with ext4 so is as fast as a normal VM disk). This is 100% compatible with Linux (because it is Linux) but some of the integration has rough edges.

        I’m not sure what your issue was with configuration: Install Windows Terminal from the Windows store. Install your favourite distro from the same store. Run the terminal, set your favourite distro as the default profile. Done.

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          There are bunch of things about configuration. Profile migration, file permissions,vscode remote server configuration, git client configuration, ssh client configuration and so on.

          It’s really cool what the microsoft trying to do, but for professional web development for linux server, plain linux will be always best choice.

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            Please consider avoiding terms like “always”.

            It’s decidedly NOT the best choice if you’re disabled and the Linux desktop fails to provide basic features necessary to get work done.

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        ruby version managment is a pain exactly because of Mac os system ruby.

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          I really like borg, it’s my timemachine. I able to recover system on any point of time. All my backups fits 500GB hdd, first backup dated 2017 year and it’s only a half of hdd, backup runs every 4 hour!

          All archives:               69.15 TB             61.60 TB            211.26 GB
          
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            I’ve tried the nuxt & nuxt content with tailwind, it’s pretty cool. philidor.dev

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              Using it as daily compositor on FreeBSD-Current, and from my own experience it’s very user-friendly. Even more than i3 that I used before. Excellent job, raichoo.

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                Do you reccomend it to bspwm longtime user ?

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                  Well, due to the fact that I have no experience with using bspwm, I cannot answer your question. But if you like minimalism, Vim-style key binding and experience, lightweight WMs/compositors and Wayland, you can give it a try and let me know how you like it =)

              1. 1

                I’m a long time user of WASD VP3 61-Key Doubleshot PBT Black/Slate Mechanical Keyboard

                https://imgur.com/ujxKAuM

                Very happy !

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                    Having one with headless installation, used for:

                    1. Samba server for my Android TV
                    2. Transmission
                    3. Music MPD + PMS client
                    4. Borg backups for my laptop
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                      Hey all, this is a project I’ve been working on and finally decided it was ready enough to show it to the public. The idea was just to build an SSH server for hosting repos which can be configured using git to show that something can be built that’s pretty solid and doesn’t depend on openssh. I’ve got a few more tweaks to make (namely following something similar to what gitolite does where a repo can only be used if it’s defined in the config).

                      It’s based on my past work on the gliderlabs/ssh library, the Gitea SSH server, and some experiments with git2go.

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                        This is exactly what I’m looking for, thanks! If you need a help, please create issues with the need help label, I’ll help!

                        1. 2

                          I added a few issues if you’re interested in helping out. Right now my main goal is to add more tests, but there’s some functionality around user config files and org config files that’s currently missing.

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                        Almost always middleware require a logger, database connection and other service. I’ve read this article and dont understand how it is differ from a plain (with gorrila toolkit or plain net/http) middleware implementations. This is just another piece of overengeenering.

                        1. 2

                          Seems like http.Request#Context() will get you access to framework-specific things.

                        1. 1

                          Vim only supports the arrow keys, not WASD.

                          Now I kind of want to write a WASD-movement plugin for Kakoune.

                          1. 1

                            I love vim, and can’t switch to anything else, but feel like I’m in some sort of limbo doing lots of cursor movement with arrows keys and in insert mode. Stuff I hear everyone say you’re not supposed to do in vim.

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                              using WASD makes even more sense with a dvorak layout! :)

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                                I remapped the arrow keys to noop and got cured. I couldn’t be happier.

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                                  Buy 61-keys keyboard without arrow keys and you will stop using it in insert mode.

                              1. 9

                                On the topic of uBlock filters, I’d hacked together this list a while ago: https://zge.us.to/files/anti-youtube.block I wonder if anyone here could suggest some improvements.

                                Basically, it makes sure that all temptations, allures and other tricks that youtube wants to use to make you watch another video are ignored – thinking about it, there’s not a lot of difference between a “recommended” section and regular advertisement. Oh, and youtube comments are blocked too for the sake of sanity.

                                1. 1

                                  Thanks, these are very handy.

                                  1. 1

                                    I find that ‘Distraction-Free for YouTube’ works quite nicely to remove a lot of the pointless YouTube UI, with the added bonus that you can toggle it on and off with one click.

                                    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/df-tube-distraction-free/mjdepdfccjgcndkmemponafgioodelna

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                                      totaly breaks youtube, the main page doesnt contains any channels, not usefull.

                                      1. 2

                                        I should have mentioned that it only makes sense when one isn’t logged in. No account usually means the recommendations are a lot worse.

                                    1. 3

                                      I’ve been using the Xiaomi Mi Notebook Pro for some time now (from AliExpress). It’s a 15 inch, 1080p, aluminium laptop. At first I discounted it as an option as I thought the Nvidia graphics would be problematic (for open source drivers), but later I read a bit more on it and realised that it’s actually switchable and only uses the Intel graphics unless you set it up otherwise. So turns out it was perfect! AFAIK, the only thing that doesn’t work is the fingerprint reader, which I wouldn’t have used anyway. The NZ adapter that came with the charger is unreliable cheap garbage, but you can either replace it or the charger itself (as the laptop itself is so cheap). I also bought a keyboard cover for the hell of it, which I thought would be really obnoxious, but I don’t even notice it, so that’s nice… Anyway, I’ve been very happy with it, and it’s very affordable, so well worth considering.

                                      Edit: Also, if it’s important (it was too me), the fans generally stay off unless you’re compiling something or trying to game on it, so in general usage it is totally silent. The fans can be a bit noisy when they do come on, but it’s only rarely. I’ve never timed it, but the battery seems to last around 6 hours for me.

                                      1. 1

                                        Same here, it very good laptop for work.

                                      1. 1

                                        The true about this blocking isn’t “counter-terrorist and counter-extremist”, they are scared TOR tokens.

                                        1. 2

                                          What is a Tor token?

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                                          Was Docker really necessary in this case? I think it is overkill.

                                          1. 1

                                            Agree. But I don’t want to install and run geth on the host machine.