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    9front has the best release names.

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      This is a cool writeup, but honestly this is not “Docker on OpenBSD” – it’s Docker running on a Linux VM on OpenBSD, the same as a Linux VM running on any other hypervisor.

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        This is also how Docker runs on Mac OS. So I’d consider it a valid solution to interoperating with other platforms that run Docker. Sure it’s nothing magical, but it’s nice to know that virtualization on OpenBSD has reached a point where, if Docker is a requirement for your job (or whatever), it no longer means you can’t run OpenBSD as your host OS.

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          They use xhyve to do the lifting, which is based on FreeBSD’s bhyve!

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          That’s why I tagged it Linux, OpenBSD and virtualization. Editorializing titles is against lobste.rs rules.

          Still I find the story interesting as it shows at what level vmm virtualization is at right now. Unlike Linux VM hypervisors, vmm is a very young codebase.

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          Although the browser version is pretty cool, the Virtual AGC which it’s based off of has quite a bit more info on the device (as well as others) on their website. It also gives you a little more background.

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            Glad to hear NetBSD is moving forward with QEMU and adding hardware assisted support as well. I was wondering if there were plans for a native hypervisor (like FreeBSD’s bhyve, OpenBSD’s vmm, and Linux KVM) but between this and xen dom0 that sounds like it’s covered.

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              In 1976 Steve Wozniak gave me a copy of his 6502 floating point math routines which I laboriously typed byte-by-byte onto paper tape late into the night. I had by then added a 6502 chip to my system to function as its floating point processor(!). The thrill of actually seeing it all work was indescribable.

              Words cannot describe how much this excerpt blows my mind.

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                I was recently given the opportunity to write another technical article on a virtualization tool I maintain called iohyve. I’m torn on whether I want to update and polish a topic from a previous article, or write a new one.

                Whether or not I pick a new topic or use an old one, I am glad to have an excuse to set aside some time to give the project some much needed TLC. Some folks who have been around the project for a while continue to help out and make improvements as well. Because of this, I am going to better outline contribution guidelines, and implement simple ways to streamline that their work gets into the project and tested in a somewhat timely manner. An obvious one, and one that has been suggested time and time again, is to move work off of the master branch into a development branch. I’m not quite sure if github allows it, but then I’d like to grant certain users certain access to branches.

                I’d also like to hit some of the low hanging fruit on the ever evolving roadmap for the project. Most notably, the Guest import/export functionality. ZFS send/receive recently got compression in FreeBSD, and a lot of people ask about how to move guests around from one machine to another. I’d like to automate the process and (of course) document it.

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                  Learning all over again that the “S” in “SNMP” is a vile lie.

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                    “It’s a trap!”

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                      Oh, like in SOAP :-)

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                        Oh goodness. I remember looking at that spec and canceling a project immediately. Totally not worth whatever I was planning on doing with it at the time.