1. 2

    VB and C++

    At one time the most used languages in the world (by some metric with the source long lost)

    Both were used extensively used to make a LOT of GUI applications back when the web was basically only good for very basic apps. I’m not saying they were the first or best, but that paradigm really took over because it made a lot of sense in UIs. The inheritance (A Button is a Control and it’s useful to iterate all Controls on a Form, etc) is actually fairly useful and the objects with events, properties and methods are fairly easy to understand.

    Once you get away from writing GUIs, OOP is perhaps a less good paradigm.

    Then Java and C# and python emerged during that time and that’s what we’ve been stuck with for 20 years. Anyone remember seeing your first Java GUI app (I remember being really weird and purple of all things)? The early use cases were desktop Gui apps where again OOP makes a lot of sense.

    I don’t think there’s much to debate. OOP is a decent paradigm for GUI apps. If you aren’t making a GUI another paradigm may be better suited.

    These days the state of the practice UIs are in react, et al which are still evolving but appear to be moving in a functional direction. It will be interesting to see how that evolves, but it’s still classes/objects/events/methods in Angular land.

    1. 24

      Animated diagrams. Something like Visio or Omnigraffle, but with the ability to easily show messages flying around, instances appearing and disappearing, clusters moving, etc.

      People usually reach for PointPoint or Keynote for this, which drives me up a wall. I’d rather have something that can directly create a video file or animated gif.

      1. 11

        Bonus points if the storage format is plain text and plays nicely with version control.

        1. 3

          With such preferences I would consider whether there are enough modules for Asymptote to write the drawing/animation code there efficiently…

          1. 3

            Perhaps something built around Mermaid.js could work. Or a graph library for D3

          2. 8

            My sibling comments have mentioned it, but here is the link to 3blue1brown’s manim.

            1. 4
              1. 1

                Thanks for that link, Reanimate looks amazing.

              2. 4

                There was an CS undergraduate thesis project that did this at AppState in December 2019. I’m not able to find it right now, but it was pretty cool. Similar to how 3blue1brown’s stuff looks/works

                1. 2

                  I looked at the code that 3blue1brown released. It’s perfect for his needs.

                2. 3

                  SVG can easily do this.

                  1. 2

                    Keynote can export both video and gif formats.

                    1. 1

                      Do you mean something like Canva? https://www.canva.com/graphs/

                      1. 1

                        Curious, what is your use case? Is this the model systems or to animate text or?

                        1. 2

                          I often want to use animation to explain the dynamics of software architecture, either in terms of the interaction of parts during runtime, or the evolution of the architecture itself over time.

                        2. 1

                          Although it’s total overkill, if I had to make animated diagrams I would use Blender.

                          1. 1

                            Probably not exactly what you want but your description made me think of LOOPY. I’ve not tried it myself at all either, just found it interesting.

                            1. 1

                              Lucidcharts is definitely not perfect, but has layers and a presentation mode that should come close to what you want, except for the video out. But maybe If you screencap the presentation?

                            1. 18

                              Nice setup.

                              1. I really advice against the side by side monitors. There problem is, your going to have your main app open in one monitor at a time so your going to be turning your neck for hours at a time. Suggest either stacking it going with a single large monitor. I got a Dell 43” 4k monitor for $700 ish. I previously had a single 32” ultra wide, which as the author mentioned is too short. Then a friend sold me his and I stacked them. That was ok but made me standing desk hard to use in standing mode.

                              I like the single monitors with a window management app. I’d love this setup now if I could get it in a curved version and a higher resolution for sharper text, but otherwise it’s amazing.

                              1. I’m always amazed that people are so hesitant to spend money on their work tools. They are tax-deductible but more importantly, they are in investment in your long term health and happiness. It’s one of the biggest advantages of working from home. Your don’t have to use the cheap crap your employer provides.

                              It’s doubly amazing because many in this situation are making $100k (possibly multiples of that). Also do many people have some crazy expensive bike,car,boat,guitars, home theater, etc that’s only used a few hours a week.

                              I know it’s tempting to cheap out, but 30,40,50 year old you will thank you.

                              That’s my PSA if the day.

                              1. 3

                                Shouldn’t have read this. The night just got expensive.

                                1. 3

                                  turning your neck for hours at a time. Suggest either stacking it going with a single large monitor.

                                  So you should be looking up for hours at a time?

                                  1. 1

                                    The distance between the center of two widescreen monitors is much smaller when stacked than when side-by-side. And of course that’s not true of landscape or square monitors. Not ALL stacked monitors are ergonomically arranged but you can reduce neck movement by stacking.

                                    1. 4

                                      I don’t know if it’s just about distance. I find the vertical angle matters much more than the horizontal angle. For example, I find laptops difficult to use for long periods because my neck gets sore looking down all the time, instead of looking straight ahead. However, I don’t have any problems with horizontal monitors.

                                  2. 1

                                    That’s a good point about the dual monitors. I’m considering having one facing flat forward, and another angled off to the side. I’d probably have to sit off to one side of my desk but that’s not too concerning.

                                    I get your point about spending money on work tools, which might fall in the same category as what people say about beds & shoes. I do worry this attitude if adopted too enthusiastically can dull judgement about whether a given tool is really necessary - for example a gas-spring monitor stand instead of a basic one or an Ergodox instead of Goldtouch keyboard (although I admit being tempted by the Kinesis Advantage2 from seeing all the people who swear by it). With the way our society is set up it is often very difficult to determine (even within our own heads) whether something expensive is a reasonable purchase that supports good craftsmanship, or just a flex.

                                    1. 6

                                      Consider rotating one of the screens. I sit straight down the middle for the landscape screen, then have the portrait screen to my right.

                                      I’m pretty sensitive to shitty ergonomic setups, and this causes me no problems at all.

                                      1. 2

                                        This is my setup too. Looks dorky, works great.

                                        1. 2

                                          I do this too. The only problem is that 16:9 screens reeally don’t like being in portrait. I have a 24” 16:9 screen to the left of the primary screen used mostly for web browsing, and it’s really common for websites to grow a combination of horizontal scroll bars and buttons with text extending outside of their bounds.

                                          1. 1

                                            Hah, yeah I got the last 16:10 that dell sold a few years ago and just picked up a partner for it, and having them side-by-side vertically is great, but I would be loathe to throw away 10% of that space.

                                          2. 1

                                            That’s a neat idea, I think I’ll try that!

                                          3. 2

                                            All decisions come with error bars. Fall on one side, you have a flex; fall on the other, you are performing worse at work than you could be.

                                            I know which side I’m happier to land on.

                                            1. 2

                                              The main point is this: every single person I’ve had a discussion on buying quality tools for work and had an objection to spending money also had some expensive hobby they were willing to splurge on. (I’m sure not everyone is like this, just seemed the people with the strongest objection had other money sinks). Is just a matter of logical consistently. They might have $25k of bike equipment in the garage but get upity about spending $500 on good equipment. That’s why this is one of my hot button issues. A course of physical therapy is going to cost more than decent equipment.

                                              My old equipment always finds it way to friends and family and tends to get years of useful life beyond me.

                                              1. 2

                                                There’s nothing logically inconsistent about spending money in some places and saving it in others. “I spent a bunch of money on thing X, so I should also spend a lot of money on thing Y” sounds more like sales tactic psychology than logical reasoning. You can easily get good enough ergonomic equipment to keep the PT away without spending much money. A $20 used Microsoft Natural Ergonomic 4000 keyboard, a $25 Anker vertical mouse… even monitor stands can be replaced with a stack of old technical manuals. A good chair is really the only thing I’d say you need, and you can get a good-enough used Costco model for like $60.

                                                1. 1

                                                  a stack of old technical manuals

                                                  To be fair, these are harder and harder to find. Same goes for phone books…

                                                  1. 1

                                                    It is if a) this is the way you make your living and b) you are oddly cheap in this area but spend big money on things you use way less. That’s the point in trying to make and I still find the behavior quite baffling.

                                                    Invest in yourself and your health.

                                                    I’m not trying to sell you a standing desk.

                                                2. 1

                                                  That’s a good point about the dual monitors. I’m considering having one facing flat forward, and another angled off to the side. I’d probably have to sit off to one side of my desk but that’s not too concerning.

                                                  At work with a two monitors set-up, I tended to have my main one in front of me flat and the other angled on the left. Not being in the centre of the desk allowed me to have a notebook and pen on the left of the mouse that I can reach for quick notes and having a space not in front of the main screen for thinking with reasonable space to use the notebook.

                                                3. 1

                                                  Could not agree more with this! Many of my colleagues think I’m crazy for sticking to one monitor but I find it not only saves my kneck but also helps keep focus.

                                                1. 2

                                                  📝 Read Computers then and now and copy it into HTML form.
                                                  💸 Finish my bank account scraper.
                                                  👾 Play Zelda, Tetris 99, Streets of Rage 4, and Risk of Rain 2
                                                  🤳🏾 Video chat with friends.
                                                  💌 Send postcards.
                                                  🚴🏾‍♂️ Ride my bike!

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Finish my bank account scraper.

                                                    I’m curious why one needs to write a scraper to get information from bank account, when there are better tools like Mint are available to help you aggregate such information.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      I thought mint was garbage the last time I used it. This was a few years ago, is it any better now?

                                                      I use tiller and hledger now.

                                                      https://www.tillerhq.com/
                                                      https://hledger.org/

                                                      I have an hledger set up but downloading all the transactions and cleaning/transforming is a bit of a chore. That’s were tiller comes in to get all the transactions in one spot.

                                                      What I like about hledger is it’s double entry accounting.

                                                      If you use hledger to it’s full extent you can see how much you really pay in taxes (down to the pennies if you choose) including payroll taxes, and what your real tax rate is. Great for personal finance nerds.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Interesting. Haven’t heard about these both options till now. Will give a try. Thank you!

                                                        1. 1

                                                          I hadn’t heard of tiller! They appear to get transaction data from yodlee. Very useful and a good price! I’m playing with it now.

                                                          (I use hledger too!)

                                                        2. 1

                                                          Because I have bank accounts domiciled where Mint in specific and tools like it don’t work.

                                                          And organisations (government, corporate, etc.) often require copies of my account statements. I have enough bank accounts that logging in, downloading, and filing the latest PDFs every month is a real pain.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            got i!

                                                          2. 1

                                                            Or open standards like FinTS (https://www.hbci-zka.de/spec/spezifikation.htm)

                                                            1. 2

                                                              It must be nice to live in Germany.

                                                        1. 15

                                                          I truly do not understand why people get upset about re-implementations of existing software. Why is it a problem for you that someone else wrote some software that works with or similarly to some existing software, in this particular language?

                                                          1. 9

                                                            In the worst case, it’s like a fork: it can split the community and result in two programs, neither of which is as good as the original could have been without being sapped of resources. I think there’s also a feeling of, “with all the cool things waiting to be invented, why did you put your effort into instead reinventing a wheel that wasn’t broken?”

                                                            On the other hand, rewriting a venerable tool in a more sustainable way can bring big benefits: I think a lot of people were skeptical of Clang at first, but it’s been a big boon to IDEs (esp Xcode) and accelerated progress in C-family compilation.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Probably because it indicates to them that the person viewed something in the original as deficient. When they invested heavily in that something, they feel like they have been slighted. I think it’s a bit of a lizard brain thing that we all have to some extent.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                Rewrite fatigue? (similar and somewhat related to js fatigue)

                                                                There was a trend not so long ago to rewrite X in Y for Z reason(s).

                                                                I think people just got tired of it.

                                                              1. 8

                                                                I’ve recently switched my laptop from NixOS to Windows, and I use WSL for all my development needs. Some notes here.

                                                                WSL 2 is pretty seemless when it comes to Linuxy development on Windows, and with VSCode remote you can edit from a native Windows application, with all extensions and tools running inside WSL 2 (example).

                                                                I used to use macOS; but nowadays you can’t even get Nix installed easily on a Mac, so I’ve given up on the Apple ecosystem entirely (they do make great hardware though).

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  Out of curiosity, why Windows over something more libre (Linux, BSD)? And with regards to development, Windows has been fairly clunky and annoying to work with (source: colleague uses Windows)—how has it faired for you?

                                                                  1. 6

                                                                    And with regards to development, Windows has been fairly clunky and annoying to work with

                                                                    People keep saying it, but I’m almost certain it’s with the implied qualification for POSIXy development, and it’s quite obvious a non-Unix isn’t fun to develop in for things that expect nothing but Unix. But that doesn’t make Windows bad for development; I was my most productive using Visual Studio instead of fighting CMake and gdb.

                                                                    1. 5

                                                                      Personally I stick to windows because I much prefer the desktop environment, compared to Linux or even macOS. It’s possible to get a dev env working well but you have to know the quirks.

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        What kind of development?

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          Python Flask / general backend web dev, I’d say.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Both Pycharm/IDEA and VSCode have excellent WSL Python support for deployment and debugging. Really love that.

                                                                        2. 3

                                                                          why Windows over something more libre (Linux, BSD)?

                                                                          As explained here, I use both and thereby get the best of both worlds - from a technology, application support and user experience points of view. Free Software is a great and all, but I’m personally not going to compromise on the aforementioned factors.

                                                                          And with regards to development, Windows has been fairly clunky and annoying to work with (source: colleague uses Windows)—how has it faired for you?

                                                                          With WSL 2 you essentially get a Linux development environment. I do everything in command line (neovim and tmux, for example), so it has not impacted my experience except in a couple of unimportant cases.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            I’ve been using wsl lately and for me it’s that everything just looks and feels much better. I didn’t want to like it.

                                                                            Before switching I had stopped using tiling window managers as an experiment and felt good about it, once I didn’t feel dependant on them, trying wsl wasn’t unreasonable.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              You didn’t ask me so I hope you’ll forgive my answering your question anyway.

                                                                              Mostly, I run Windows as well as Linux because as @srid says I feel like doing so enables me to get the best of both worlds, and additionally because I chose poorly when I bought this laptop and its compatibility with Linux is somewhat unstable at best (Laptops with the Nvidia Optimus chipset are notorious for this).

                                                                            2. 3

                                                                              I can totally imagine the situation you’re in right now. As I pointed out on my blog, after a decade spent investing in the Apple ecosystem, I am at a crossroads. I love the Apple hardware, but am at odds with Apple becoming a gatekeeper of its macOS ecosystem. I have used Windows prior to 2010, and during its darkest days. A lot has happened since then, and I have to say, suddenly, thinking of using Windows for *nix development doesn’t sound outlandish at all.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                That’s the thing, I had to excise a whole bunch of Windows 95/98/early NT era scar tissue before I could objectively look at what Windows 10 + WSL 2 is today.

                                                                                For some at least I suspect if they can successfully do this it could be a compelling option.

                                                                            1. 19

                                                                              I was hoping this was a list of careers for when you eventually burn out of web dev.

                                                                              1. 6

                                                                                sighs it’s not just me?

                                                                                I hit this point almost ten years ago and felt so alone.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  same. best i found is ML infra or security

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    i’m very much looking for such too, any lobsters want to write up such an article?

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      If I had the answers I would. I am glad that there are at least 3-17 other people that are feeling the same.

                                                                                      I’ve considered the following: Get out of full stack and focus on the front end (more fun too me, no threading issues, etc) Devil’s DBA Change careers to something unrelated like Ag Banking

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        Personally, I’d go with a combo of ML and DevSecOps, if you can find it. The combo would give experience in several powerful and upcoming career opportunities, and if it fell apart you could always use the skills learned in a re-fashoined combination, like ML and Security.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          The combo would give experience in several powerful and upcoming career opportunities

                                                                                          At least as long as people think machine learning is a hammer and every problem is a nail.

                                                                                          Brian Kernighan briefly mentions the excitement about it in the early days of computing here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9upVbGSBFo

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            I completely agree. Don’t get me started about ML and AI (or lack of AI)

                                                                                            But people think that way, and those people are doing the hiring. I was answering the question “Where is the most money and career challenges?” There’s a better question, imo, which is: What kind of work would I enjoy doing in five years? I have no basis to even start on that one.

                                                                                            Having said that, as somebody who has suffered through server/cloud deployments and maintenance over and over again, DevSecOps is pretty cool. When I think about all the tech that keeps calling me to go play and learn more, DevSecOps is probably in the top five.

                                                                                        2. 1

                                                                                          I specialized into compilers and security. There’s a lot of work out there.

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            I agree there’s no shortage of bug reports for compilers (0, 1, 2, 3) but the number of paid compiler jobs I saw in the last decade is probably less than 10…

                                                                                    1. -4

                                                                                      Wtf is this?

                                                                                      1. 9

                                                                                        Website (internet)

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          I don’t know why, but this was funny enough to make me spit my food out.

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        https://lemire.me/blog/

                                                                                        Daniel Lemire’s blog is worth following. He seems to come up with practical perf improvements often.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          My first thought is: People still use Rails?

                                                                                          Of course when I think about it, there is that famous curve where you have a huge uptick in a lot of coverage of a thing, with relatively few users in the grand scheme of things (but it appears like everyone is using it depending on what news bubble you are in). That been quite a few years ago now, so it is probably fair to say that Rails is quite mature at this point.

                                                                                          The only thing I don’t know: this the mature phase where usage increases slowly, or where usage decreases such that it eventually disappears?

                                                                                          As an aside, with the link to the Rails Doctrine I find it interesting to note when it talks about “Rails Migration of 2.x to 3” being painful, leaving a lot of people behind, and souring of others - it has a version number inline with python…

                                                                                          This article should be written for every framework or library :-).

                                                                                          1. 9

                                                                                            Notably, this site is written in Rails.

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              That is interesting actually. I wouldn’t have excepted that.

                                                                                            2. 5

                                                                                              I’m still finding rails astonishingly productive if your team can handle the (significant!) ops overhead.

                                                                                              So many little details that work well.

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                That is probably one of the things that kept me from ever bothering with it TBH. I find stuff like asp.net more straightforward.

                                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                                  It really depends on how much programming work is going to be required. If you’re planning to spend 6 weeks building and 6 years operating a site, rails doesn’t really make sense. If you expect to continually have multiple programmers work on the site, the operational overhead is negligible compared to the productivity advantages.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    That’s a very strong claim to make.

                                                                                                    Maybe in 2005 when RoR was considered cutting edge. But today?

                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                      I’m honestly unclear which direction you think it’s strong in (I have heard much stronger opinions in both directions).

                                                                                                      For context, I have used rails for paid work during every calendar year since 2008, though some years only had a little bit of it. In that time, I’ve held various roles including the primary on-call, lead developer, devops setup person, and also run several sites using various tech stacks.

                                                                                                      Rails sites require a very different level of devops work to, say, golang. It’s typical for a rails app to require:

                                                                                                      • Multiple server roles (web, worker, periodic task trigger)
                                                                                                      • Multiple key/value stores (redis for sidekiq, memcached for caching)
                                                                                                      • A full webpack configuration
                                                                                                      • A relational database
                                                                                                      • Multiple third party APIs which don’t come with backoff configured (eg mailer, captcha)
                                                                                            1. 4

                                                                                              Been stuck back at home recently since my college closed in the nearest capital city (Melbourne, AU). I’ve recently been building a new security-focused homelab out of smaller machines in a flight case so that it’s easier to move around.

                                                                                              A few RPis, NUCs for VMs, Foirtnet firewall, and the newest addition of a PC Engines APU board with OpenBSD (my first openbsd experience, actually)!

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                What is the APU board for, using as a router?

                                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                                  At the moment, yes! Long term I’m looking at chucking in a Data-only SIM card and also using it as a 4G backup as well - given the state of NBN VDSL and ancient copper in my area it’s something that would be handy to have

                                                                                                2. 1

                                                                                                  Is there somewhere local to get an APU board that doesn’t cost an arm a a leg?

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    Everywhere I found in Aus seems to be out of stock at the moment. I think there’s only one official distributor up in NSW that’s out of stock, so I had to order from the EU which was a bit pricey unfortunately.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  Teaching my since to code with phaser.

                                                                                                  Building an infinite runner starring our president and his run for the Whitehouse. His laughter is a great reward.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    Just want to point out, in SQL Server

                                                                                                    A CTE must be followed by a single SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE statement

                                                                                                    so which databases let you run multiple selects on a single CTE? Because that sounds great. Postgres docs talk about “one query” but I’ll just try it myself I guess

                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                      I’m using PostgreSQL in the examples, and I’ve worked with Oracle in the past, and I don’t know of such a limit on neither.

                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                        I believe it’s a sql server limitation, note however that can define multiple ctes and a cte can reference a previously defined cte. This is the most common workaround, but sometimes you still need a temp table (rarely for me at least)

                                                                                                        Just looked at the example again and that is what the author is doing, there’s 2 ctes there.

                                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                                          Do you happen to know if you can do updates or deletes inside a CTE in SQL Server? I hadn’t ever seen that done until this article. Wasn’t sure if it was just a postgres thing.

                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                            I don’t have this type of experience with SQLServer. Maybe someone else here can provide an answer.

                                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                                        At first I thought the special keyboard was a deal killer.

                                                                                                        But many people are used to symbols b/c emojis. Hhmmmm…..

                                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                                          Many people are also used to dead keys and other kinda of assisted entry for complex symbols. Usually not in the US, but I’m sure that can be solved by a workflow tutorial. Smartphones also gave raise to short codes, eg. my phone has “thr” mapped to “(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻”.

                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                          I’ve found that developers new to web development are very dependant on a debugger. Devs who have a lot of experience in Java or .net seem to expect the same level of debugging experience.

                                                                                                          My tips:

                                                                                                          1. Use console.log
                                                                                                          2. Console.log can take objects as arts and dump them right to your console 3.debugger; if you really need to debug, you’ve got it built into your web browser Dev console. Debugger triggers it.

                                                                                                          This isn’t rocket science, but I’ve seen enough experienced devs get into full stack and really struggle with js debugging.

                                                                                                          Logging > debugging

                                                                                                          I’m not sure which book it was (coders at work?) but I discovered a lot of well known devs were just using logging statements. I’ve seen a lot of devs get twisted up in their own code with debuggers. A breakpoint on every line is a sure sign that you’re in trouble.

                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                            On debugging vs logging, once you go distributed, debugging just isn’t going to do that much for you.

                                                                                                            Use a good logging framework and platform.

                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                            Actually using one. I started coding where there was no such thing. Then the only option was gdb and I was using C++ on Linux. So there may as well have been no such thing.

                                                                                                            Then I used VB6 and you could see exactly what was going on and make tweaks at runtime. A revelation! Similar with .NET, though mods at runtime hardly ever worked - not sure why they seemed to be disabled every time I went to try.

                                                                                                            I started using OzCode though, which was amazing. If you write C#, check it out. Searching through data in a large data structure in RAM and flagging what you want to be shown to you as you step through… it’s the sort of thing that feels like it should be part of the IDE, like ReSharper does (and kind of is now).

                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                              I just installed OzCode to help debug our bug generator err report generator code that is thousands of lines of EF and Linq. It’s a nightmare.

                                                                                                              OzCode seems solid, ReSharper less so. I’ve had a ReSharper license forever but it makes VS almost unusable.

                                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                                I’ve had varying levels of ‘success’ with ReSharper. When it plays nicely and doesn’t grind things to a halt, it feels like I have some minor superpowers.

                                                                                                                Yes OzCode brings the ability to debug to code using LINQ. The laziness and magic of LINQ plus EF can become a nightmare pretty quickly.

                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                              Good grief just pick something already.

                                                                                                              This is turning into a undergrad designing their first language.

                                                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                                                With the number of bad choices requiring huge transition phases a various well designed languages have had why rush now?

                                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                                  Quite the opposite. An undergrad would have just picked something & run with it. It takes many years of painful experience to know that this is a very risky proposition.

                                                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                                                  I’ve noticed that projects that come out of Google are crazy complicated.

                                                                                                                  Example: Angular. Dear Zeus who designed this nightmare. Rxjs and observables everywhere (and with typescript in the mix, you end up fighting the transpiler as an added bonus when you do anything slightly complex). Inability to build shareable libraries Two separate form modules. A complicated component lifecycle. Crazy build times. The bizarre parameters they favor over query strings, on and on.

                                                                                                                  The cherry on top is the awful docs and the issue that the showcase site for Angular https://angular.io/docs regularly fails to load properly.

                                                                                                                  Forget turtles, it’s clown shoes all the way down.

                                                                                                                  1. 5

                                                                                                                    And I’m super curious about viable alternative viable alternatives, now or in the future.

                                                                                                                    For example Micro VMs seem promising https://firecracker-microvm.github.io/

                                                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                                                      Hiking, working on a side project and fighting off probable Covid, no fever…yet.