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    Mark Guzdial is one of the most active researchers in Computer Science Education. Anyone interested can see his blog at: https://computinged.wordpress.com/

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      Love the gentle fun poking at Kenneeth Reitz :)

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        me too ;)

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        -performance because she isn’t benchmarking code, but people!

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          You’re right. Thank you!

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          It seems BSD is dying (2002) for almost 20 years…

          Remember the hilarious Jason Dixon’s presentations BSD is Dying (2007) and BSD is still dying (2009).

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            I seem to remember there was a company that sold a spreadsheet to python converter. Can’t recall their name right now.

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              Do you mean xlwings?

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              Hmm..

              I think he misses one thing though.

              There are also expert learners out there.

              That video is nice for a novice teacher teaching mediocre learners at novice or competent level.

              The click click click through bullet point as he reads drives me nuts. Where are the slides? Why can’t I run this video at 1.5x speed? This is tooooo slow for me.

              I’m not sure he is as expert as he claims… I have seen papers that indicate the 7 plus or minus 2 thing is pretty debunked.

              The one useful take away that was new? The idea of TDD’d via starting with the exercises.

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                Slides are here: http://third-bit.com/lesson-design/

                I don’t get when he claims to be an expert. Are you sure he does?

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                Bear in mind this is a proposal and is not part of the roadmap. You can read it on a sprint report:

                Another interesting vision statement was about using Rust in Mercurial. Most people agreed that Mercurial would benefit from porting its native C code in Rust, essentially for security reasons and hopefully to gain a bit of performance and maintainability. More radical ideas were also proposed such as making the hg executable a Rust program (thus embedding a Python interpreter along with its standard library) or reimplementing commands in Rust (which would pose problems with respect to the Python extension system). Later on, Facebook presented mononoke, a promising Mercurial server implemented in Rust that is expected to scale better with respect to high committing rates.

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                  Also from release notes: “Python 2 is no longer installed by default. Python 3 has been updated to 3.6.”

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                    This is a step in the right direction. I’ve been using Python 3 for all my projects in the last few months and I have to say, outside of whatever performance differences there might be (haven’t noticed them yet) the transition has been smooth, and things like MyPy are great.

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                      On that note, I got 10x speedup with PyPy which now supports Python 3.5. I’m super impressed, but it only works well on server-type workloads.

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                    Also they’re using Telegram channels and groups as well as GitHub web hosting to organize all activities of civil disobedience.

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                      tldr: book promotion

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                        I suppose, but the books being “promoted” are each over 30 years old. The Psychology of Computer Programming was originally published in 1971. Becoming a Technical Leader was published in 1986.

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                          What’s more, the books have very much held up. ‘The psychology of computer programming’ is still considered an insightful book on the subject, and is still in print.

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                          That’s right but I thought that short text was worth a read and reflection a thought.

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                          That…seems quite a bit more complicated than it really needs to be. In my experience it’s also good to avoid executing code at import time in these modules, because this code is imported both during packaging and during runtime (for pkg_resources and such). For instance, is README.rst really going to be present in $PWD at runtime?

                          This really could be trimmed down to just that call to setup and nothing more.

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                            For instance, is README.rst really going to be present in $PWD at runtime?

                            I’ve seen variations of this one go wrong myself. Strongly agree that i/o in setup.py is a terrible idea.

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                              Requests has been doing it for like 6 years! Never once been an issue, and we’ve been installed like… more than almost anything else.

                              Just need to specify it in MANIFEST.in.

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                                By the way, I heard about PEP 518 being implemented in pip 10. Do you think setup.py will eventually die as a consequence? In that case, how long do you think the adoption would take?

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                                  Given that people are still using Python2.6, quite a while :)

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                            That was a great read! Anyone care to share some similar Python internals insights? Where would one go to learn more about that?

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                              Some months ago it was posted here in lobsters a book named Understanding Python Internals that maybe you’d like.

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                              Nice! If you could bring someone on to talk about Python package management, that would be awesome!

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                                Yes please! Someone from the PyPA would be great.

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                                I’d love to hear one on the BSD ports tree.

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                                  Better yet, one for each BSD packaging system!

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                                  I skimmed through this, and it looked kind of like Go’s context? Is that the tl;dr? I’ve been out of the loop for Python 3, so I have a lot less context on the shift to async and coroutines, but as someone who writes Go, and used to love writing and using generators for random things in Python 2, I can see how this could be useful, and very interesting!

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                                    You can read in the rationale:

                                    Some languages that have coroutines or generators recommend to manually pass a context object to every function, see [1] describing the pattern for Go. This approach, however, has limited use for Python, where we have a huge ecosystem that was built to work with a TLS-like context. Moreover, passing the context explicitly does not work at all for libraries like decimal or numpy, which use operator overloading.

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                                      Oh interesting. I’m going to upgrade to “reading” rather than skimming. Thanks for the inspiration!

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                                      To me it sounded more like putting something like xlocal, which I’ve used and liked for this purpose in the past, in the standard library.

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                                      It’s interesting to ponder why Google would invite someone with a completely opposite worldview. Not just different, but a perspective that openly calls for the end of all the Googles out there. I have to watch it.

                                      Edit: Gold nugget in the last final seconds:

                                      Interviewer: Do you have anything you’d like to ask us [Googlers, marketers, software engineers]?

                                      Chomsky: Why not do some of the serious things?

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                                        Remember that Google might not equal the Googler or team of them that invited this person. This is a huge company with a lot of different kinds of people. I imagine they bring in many different kinds of people to suite different tastes. It’s also not going to be threatened by someone disagreeing with it given the audience can just shout the person out the door and not invite them again. One or more inviting him probably liked some stuff he said in a movie or presentation. Then, they thought some people might enjoy hearing him speak. The end.

                                        That’s my default assumption anyway.

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                                          I agree. In fact it would’ve been more notorious not accepting the proposal of his talk.

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                                            Working at Google (but having no idea of the background of this talk) I would very much expect it to have happened like that.

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                                            It’s interesting to ponder why Google would invite someone with a completely opposite worldview. Not just different, but a perspective that openly calls for the end of all the Googles out there. I have to watch it.

                                            That’s a good way to signal you’re secure in your worldview: freely invite people to challenge it.

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                                              While I agree with you in the general case, I think Google is doing this to placate it’s employees. What better way to dispel animosity than to accept the other side as one of your own?

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                                                (kind of tangential, but…) I’ve always found it fascinating how social movements often collapse when legitimized.

                                                It’s like when a manager gives lip service to the concerns of an unhappy employee, making them feel like it’s all going to be better soon, but effort is not spent to actually change a situation.

                                                When you walk around Google campuses, there is often material on the walls in common areas that talks about various social causes that Google is working to improve. It feels great to think that your organization is part of the solution.

                                                The gap between superficial and structural control structures is interesting to pay attention to when seeking changes to a system. You can really dispel the risk of an insurrection by letting a Black Panther get elected, bringing in an external investigator to fix your sexual harassment problems, hosting a Noam Chomsky talk, etc… without risking any structural change.

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                                                I think know what you’re trying to say, but if your opinion is “Google should stop existing” and then Google invites you to give a talk, what’s the point here? They’re not going to be persuaded into oblivion, so… why? As a pretense of open-mindedness? Or maybe it wants to be associated with the intellectual prestige of Chomsky? What’s the real reason, I wonder.

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                                                  An institution like Google might not even consider it to be at odds with a progressive, anti-capitalist view like Chomsky’s - it’s a different sphere with a different perception of reality. “Don’t be evil” is not just a empty phrase, these people really believe it. Moreover, the questions given by the interviewer where purely instrumentalist in nature: science is a tool for them, a means to an end. It’s an attempt to learn from an famous scientist, without considering the moral issues which are much more important to someone like Chomsky.

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                                                    “Don’t be evil” is not just a empty phrase

                                                    They dropped that a while back if you’re talking Google. The company has been practicing plenty of evil in surveillance sense, too. Hell, just the revenues versus spending on quick, security patches for Android by itself shows how evil they’ll be to their users to squeeze extra profit out. ;)

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                                                      I totally agree. What I meant was that the people behind the institution called Google most certainly have a different perception of evil.

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                                                A friend’s workplace had protestors picket outside its door. The boss brought out coffee and donuts, warmly thanked them all for coming, and went back in. Within a half-hour, fed on the company’s dime and with no target for anger, they wandered off.

                                                The Google employees watched a rousing argument from a famous voice. Really what they watched is their employer act totally unworried while a thousand other employees sat still. Next comes lunch or that mid-afternoon status meeting with the team in Australia. There’s no social movement started here. If Chomsky is lucky he planted a seed, but it’s pretty easy to forget someone ineffective telling you that you’re wasting your life and should do something uncomfortable.

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                                                  6 years old already? I remember first reading this in 2013. Did we learn anything?

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                                                    It would be interesting to suggest to Norvig that he write a current update…

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                                                      Sorry. I forgot to add the year it was published.

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                                                      Related entry posted by @pushcx months ago: Awesome Falsehood

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                                                        Professors: Choose books your students can read and understand. If you can’t find one, write one. It’s not that hard. Then require students to read, and check whether they understand.

                                                        I’d like to point out here that all of the best textbooks I’ve laid hands upon were written and developed in the course of teaching a class. So it seems to have been demonstrated repeatedly that you can write the textbook concurrently with teaching it and that this produces excellent results.

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                                                          Exactly! That’s the beginning of another great post from Downey: Free Books, Why Not?

                                                          In 1998 I wrote a short textbook for one of my classes and released it under a free license