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        Here is the readable non medium version : https://outline.com/te4tnL

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          The only thing missing is org mode…

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            I recently started using org-roam and org-ref to build up a personal knowledge database with an eye to writing papers on Scottish music history, and it’s been great so far. Highlights include:

            • The full markup power of org-mode (similar to Markdown, but IMHO more expressive)
            • The benefits you mentioned of everything being plain text, working with git, etc.
            • Interactive visualizations with org-roam-server
            • Really effortlessly looking up backlinks (the entire point of org-roam)
            • Integrating with org-mode’s todo/agenda system to spin off things to do and keep track of them (frequently I’ll be reading a paper and add a todo to look up some obscure source that only exists in a specific research library, for example).
            • Relatedly, turning my todo items into a kanban board
            • Pulling together all my notes so I can write something formal, and having the org file get turned into a beautiful PDF (via LaTeX) all from within Emacs
            • Painlessly inserting citations from a dedicated bibliography file I maintain, with whatever format is needed.
            • Using org links / org-roam to keep track of annotations on the sources themselves.

            And what’s wild is I still feel like I’m scratching the surface.

            After a few weeks I have 219 notes containing 10,000 words and ~350 links. It’s really wonderful how effortless it is to spin up a new note.

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            Our coffee machines use mqtt to allow you to order a drink without touching the machine. Scan a qr code, open the machine specific site (example: https://touchless.coffee/order/PenmVKV7yNcTs) and order or customize your drink. Press order and it’s dispensed in your cup.

            On each machine a c++ client runs which connects to an mqtt server, uses a custom binary protocol over mqtt (for bandwidth efficiency, we were given a quota of 7mb per month of data) that describes the coffee machine including customizations and some code for security.

            Due to covid we implementated this and it’s really cool to do. Both the server setup (involved bridging) and the c++ code. How do you handle reconnects, protocol design, live feedback (what I’d you didn’t place a cup?) etc. Without mqtt we couldn’t have done it.

            The users often tell me that they are surprised how fast the response is. Because of mqtt!

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              That is so cool. What’s the throughput? Like if you had to measure in Cups Per Hour (CPS)?

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                Well a consumptions time differs greatly depending on how it’s configured. An instant coffee (like powder and water) can be in your cup in about 8 seconds, but an espresso with freshly ground beans through our latest brewer can take up to a minute. We also have an actual filter paper brewer which is around 50 seconds, and if you add (fresh) milk (latte, cappuccino etc) it will take longer. All depends on software configuration of recipes and the coffee hardware.

                The mqtt part is like under a second. We have machines with a 2g dongle where we measured it to be at max 3 seconds, from pressing start on the webpage to the machine receiving the order and start dispensing.

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              That’s horrifying. And awesome. But mostly horrifying.

              For a follow-on, I demand that someone find a way to do modular exponentiation in CSS.

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                They stopped to think if they should, they just knew they could.

                But still amazing!

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                Instead of

                set(CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS "${CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS} -pthread" )
                

                You might want to do

                find_package(Threads REQUIRED)
                target_link_libraries(YourExecutable Threads::Threads)
                

                It’s more portable (supports Win32 threads) and it will only set it for your target, instead of for every target in your project.

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                  Oh man this is great. Thank you! You wouldn’t know how much issues I have in another project with a windows build and threads, will be very helpful! Will have to edit the site later, can’t do that on mobile. edit: updated the site with a backlink here and the site linked in your profile.

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                    You’re welcome! CMake is pretty nice if you use it the “right” way, but there are so many small things you can do to upset it and make your experience miserable. I should probably write them all down instead of forgetting them and re-discovering them…

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                  https://kayode.co/noindex-kayodes-office/

                  Setup:

                  • 2 x 24” LG 4k monitors (The center one acts as a docking station.)
                  • 16” MacBook Pro. Base model with 1tb ssd.
                  • Microsoft Sculpt Keyboard
                  • Logitech M705 Mouse
                  • Apple Magic Trackpad 2
                  • Remarkable 2 tablet (on an inbox tray under the center monitor)

                  Items of note:

                  • Rain Design mStand Laptop Stand
                  • LEGO Star Wars Midi-Scale Imperial Star Destroyer (8099)
                  • Wolf Mask by Merimask Designs.

                  No screenshot due to a lot of personal/sensitive information but I’m running:

                  • Scrivener
                  • Safari
                  • Apple Music
                  • Telegram
                  • Discord
                  • Terminal (ssh session to my website, nothing else running)
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                    How do you like the remarkable 2?

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                      I absolutely love it. It’s a digital notebook with some ereader capability. I’ve wanted something like this for years. It’s replaced the legal pads and notebooks I have laying around. The build quality of the hardware is fairly high and pen feel is amazing.

                      It’s very hackable as well. It runs Linux. The root password is in the help screen. Adding ddvk’s remarkable-hacks adds significant functionality that takes okay software to fairly decent software. Cloud syncing is similar to iCloud. It usually works fast but not instantly; sometimes it takes a bit.

                      The price is a bit high and the company is having growth issues in relation for support. For official accessories, get the Marker Plus. Having an eraser on the other end is worth the extra $50. If you’re looking to save money, skip the official cases. If you’re going to buy an official case, spend the $150 for the leather folio. It’s expensive and it definitely does not feel worth $150 but it makes the tablet feel like a moleskine notebook.

                      It’s not one thing that makes the reMarkable 2 amazing for me. It’s all the little things, including how limited it is. If you want a digital notebook you don’t mind doing a little hacking on, it’s truly amazing. If you want it to be anything else, you will be sorely disappointed, especially for the price.

                      The one big bug that is extremely painful: PDF annotations do not export properly unless the original pdf was in A4 page size. They only look correct on the tablet and in their apps. You have to make make a script to extract the PDFs and feed them though one of the libraries people have made.

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                        Thanks for the honest and quite extensive reply. I’m still doubting to either buy a 1 or a 2…

                        ddvk’s remarkable-hacks

                        This is cool, thanks! I like their readme section on Linux. Its just: You got this.

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                        I can’t speak for OP, but I absolutely love mine. I’ve tried various notebook replacement tablets in the past. I’ve always fallen back to paper. This is the first tablet that I’ve been able to fully replace all of my paper notebooks with.

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                      Also relevant: https://the-gadgeteer.com/2019/04/15/gl-inet-gl-mt300n-v2-mango-mini-travel-router-review/

                      I have a few glinet devices myself. One is in use to make a wired linksys spa ip phone “wireless”. Power for the glinet comes from the phone, the glinet bridges wifi to the wired interface including corporate VPN and with rather shitty wifi the call quality is impressive.

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                        There is Erlang tool called Tsung that supports exactly what you need (unless you need some logic there). About maintaining the tests, you can use proxy recorder which makes it fairly easy to create new test suites depending on your needs. And with distributed testing you can really push your SUT to the knees if you need.

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                          I love tsung. Back when I did more devops than c++ it was my goto for load testing. I’ve written about it and how to setup a distributed setup, have more servers load test: https://raymii.org/s/articles/Basic_Website_load_testing_with_Tsung.html

                          Combine the distribution with AWS or openstack and you can spin up hundreds of servers for an hour long load test, pay pennies and have a nice report.

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                          Ah that explains why I was logged out. If you ever decide you’re accepting donations I’d be happy to give some. Out of curiosity, did anything bad happen between alynpost and or was this a planned action?

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                            It’s mentioned in the post details, emphasis mine:

                            resigning as moderator and sysadmin to focus on other projects

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                            Thanks for sharing my post :)

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                              Saw it in the rss feed and liked it! I wonder if I could get a stock regular pc debian install to use <32 mb ram…

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                                Easily! Without X running and a bare install it should use around 7MB. Running Debian inside a container is even lighter. I’ve seen Debian OpenVZ VM’s and LXC containers using under 10MB RAM with a web server running.

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                              Yeah, I don’t get why this is so prevalent among mobile apps especially. I don’t even expect a full detailed list, but this is just pointless filling in of forms for the sake of it.

                              Probleemoplossingen en prestatievereringen is a pretty awkward translation IMO; it’s almost like the translator was forbidden to use more than two words and was forced to invent a new one.

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                                Regarding the translation comment, I suspect it’s auto translated. Looking at your site -> resume, you speak dutch, cool!

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                                Long time Tiny Tiny RSS user recently converted to Miniflux. If you’re mostly on desktop, ttrss is still perfect. On mobile however, miniflux for me is the better choice. (https://raymii.org/s/articles/Tiny_Tiny_RSS_vs_Miniflux.html)

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                                    That’s cool! Even has reddit, and a webpage instead of shell text output.

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                                    I find it strange that the Floodgap proxy still has a “Proxy too slow? Get free clients and plugins for your favorite mobile and desktop browsers. Visit the Overbite Project. “.

                                    There are no mainstream browsers that still support that addon. And that’s a shame, regardless of whether reviving Gopher is a good idea or not. Stripping web browsers of real extensibility definitely isn’t a good idea.

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                                      Firefox has a working overbite extension, with an extra local component. Works great for me. On ios there is a browser named “gopher” and Android has two, I use diggydog

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                                        Got a link to that extension? Of it’s the “official” extension that works that way now? Last I checked it would just redirect to the floodgap proxy. I’ve been using (a still somewhat experimental) gophwr project, a GUI client written in Racket.

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                                          https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/overbitenx/

                                          nx has the native component and wx is the web proxy redirect

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                                      This is a great deep dive, fun to read. Sadly recognizable in python 2, in the likes of “ordinal not in range”…

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                                        https://outline.com/4GzYbA for those who dislike medium.com

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                                          Thanks Remy, I enjoyed reading through the shell script source, which inspired me to write a post about wait, and about shell scripting today.

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                                            That is a great post, fun to read. I like such posts with backstory and musings. Often unable to write those myself, I’d rather stick to guides.

                                            Subscribed to your rss feed as well.