1. 8

    Here are the Nitter links:

    Nitter is a FOSS frontend to Twitter inspired by Invidio. No ads or tracking and it even works without JS.

    1. 1

      Thanks folks, I had no idea this was a big concern. I’ll resort to your ways on my next post(s)… btw, I cannot find an easy way to edit this current submission in order to change the URL to GitHub’s, is this intentional? :-S

      If there’s any admin/moderator reading this, please could you change the link as @raymii and @Phate6660 suggest (back to GitHub instead of Twitter?).

      1.  

        Hey man, I don’t want to scare you away, I do appreciate the post. I do however object to Twitter, the nitter link posted above, I like that a bit better.

        But, that is all my own opinion and preference, not the rules. So please don’t feel unwelcome or uncomfortable.

        1.  

          Not at all, I value your feedback! Always happy to learn and avoid tracking as much as possible ;)

    1.  

      This is a great article. Informative, full of tinkering and old hardware. I love it.

      1. 1

        I have been using stringer for several years, and I am relatively happy with it.

        1. 2

          A deploy to heroku button, thats cool. And great self hosting instructions. But boy do I have bad memories on rails hosting, rvm and passenger…

        1. 1

          I originally chose TTRSS precisely because there is an android app available. Is there a good one for miniflux? Also, a migration would be needed. I still have and look at my google reader archive as well.

          1. 1

            I don’t know if there is an android app for miniflux. Honestly, the web version is so much better than ttrss, that I, for myself, have no need for an app anymore.

            There is fever support, so any app that supports that will work.

            Do you mean feeds? You can export an opml file and import it. Or do you mean content like stars?

            1. 1

              content, archive, and to a lesser extent, stars

          1. 1

            Thanks - nice review.

            Did you investigate migrating data from Tiny Tiny RSS to Miniflux (I don’t mean OPML, I mean starred posts, etc)? I’ve looked at migrating to something else for a variety of reasons, one of which is the maintainer’s quite poor attitude. He’s notoriously picky and downright rude at times and others have made some other criticisms.

            1. 1

              No I have not, stars are not a feature I use.

            1. 9

              Could you link not to Twitter but to the github linked in the tweet: https://github.com/brainstorm/bbtrackball-rs - Twitter ads nothing but a useless manual redirect full of tracking.

              1. 5

                I see what you mean, but the twitter thread has quite a lot of context that would otherwise be lost if I just posted the GitHub link, i.e:

                https://twitter.com/braincode/status/1310200888305172481

                Cheers!

              1. -1

                Off topic, but this is the first merged story I see, cool!.

                1. 3

                  Miniflux is my favorite news reader too! Almost all the content I consume, I receive using Miniflux.

                  1. 3

                    I just added your feed to my Miniflux installation and saw the ‘Cost’ article, which promted me on a rabbit hole of others posting costs articles, so the natural thing was to write my own as well: https://raymii.org/s/blog/Costs_to_run_raymii.org.html. Your blog looks nice, how did you get the “Speak to me” to work?

                    1. 4

                      Oh cool :D

                      Two questions out of curiosity: 1. Why do you run 6 servers for a static site? Even with 10k visitors a day, shouldn’t 1 server, maybe with a caching CDN, be enough? 2. Why do you link to archived versions everywhere?

                      1. 4
                        1. Because it’s fun. That way I can toy around with other operating systems or different webservers without much impact on the site. It’s also a form of redundancy, as we speak one of the providers has a networking issue and that would otherwise bring down the entire site. But indeed, one server is way more than enough.

                        2. I’ve been writing since 2006 and since then many sites I linked to are dead, have changed or have different content then when I linked them. I try to use archive.org links often to preserve the content, but also the context when I linked. If a visitor of my site in 2030 wanted to look at your page, which I’ve linked, via an archive link there is more chance that he or she can read the original.

                        3. One question for you, how does your article read out loud work? Is it espeak, Javascript or pregenerated?

                        1. 2
                          1. Oh ok, have fun :D

                          2. True, I have experienced this too, even though I’m blogging for just a few years.

                          3. It’s using the SpeechSynthesis Web API. On some articles, I’ve also added an MP3 using Google’s TTS or AWS Polly.

                  1. 3

                    it has a memory controller issue and cannot operate correctly with 2 sticks of ram

                    1. 1

                      yeah there is a buyer on aliexpress who thankfully posted their experience on this (in russian). The board sees the ram, it posts fine, but Linux is highly unstable with it.

                      Pull the ram out of either slot, so it’s single and it runs fine.

                      1. 3

                        Hey you’re on lobsters yourself! Off topic but I really like your site and articles. It’s always fun time when my rss reader lists your site with a new article.

                        I’m curious though on the person behind it, the “from se Asia” at the bottom on every post is quite sparse.

                        1. 1

                          Hey! Im glad you enjoy it, I do put a lot of work into it, and accidentally too much money this month!

                          I guess I could do a AMA although it’s really not all that exciting

                          I saw a sign on the side of the street in London that said “Why not go to Hong Kong?”. And I thought to myself, why not? So I hopped on a plane the next day and I’ve been living here for seven years now. I put in my application for permanent residence so all being well I’ll get my *** ID card, and a Chinese name and have immigrated here.

                          I do like virtual stuff as it’s VERY portable. It’s sad and annoying looking back 10+ years ago as I’ve lost everything I’ve owned a few times now, but all I got is some backups and disk images that I was crazy enough to put onto servers in someone else’s data centre years ago.

                    1. 3

                      One more argument to move to miniflux.

                      1. 1

                        Paid hosting sign ups are closed there. Which is too bad, I don’t really want to self host this since it only works with postgres, and I have no other reason to setup/run/maintain postgres.

                        1. 2

                          That does tend to be annoying, but my experience with maintaining postgres for my email setup so far has been to 1) set it up, 2) configure backups &c and 3) forget about it. So if you’re willing to put in the up-front work it’s probably pretty painless.

                          1. 1

                            Postgres has a pretty easy-to-use docker container, which would probably be adequate for this use.

                            1. 2

                              Except when trying to migrate to another major postgres release, which isn’t all that easy with those containers.

                              1. 1

                                In that case and for this use I’d probably just do a dump and restore. There’s no downtime limitation, so that seems like it should be adequate.

                          2. 1

                            I’d never heard of this but just installed it, it’s cool. Light in resources, Debian package repo, clear installation instructions and it feels faster than ttrss. I’ve been using and advocating ttrss for years, but this might be my switch moment. The content parsing is better and it does not require an app on mobile. With ttrss I cannot subscribe to a feed in the ios app…

                            Thank you!

                            1. 1

                              The only thing that keeps me from ditching ttrss is that miniflux seems to have no ability to adjust the sorting. I prefer to have the newest articles on top on the first page.

                              1. 2

                                Under Settings there seems to be a sort option. I also want newest on top: https://i.postimg.cc/bN85Jvwn/Selectie-0988.png

                                1. 1

                                  Nice thanks!

                          1. 2

                            This reminds me of Gimpshop, a sort of photoshop layout version of gimp.

                            1. 2

                              Huh, the obvious name to me is c++ookieclicker.

                              1. 1

                                At first I didn’t do that because I thought github wouldn’t allow it as a name. Now after checking, I could have done so, but now it’s already named with an underscore.

                              1. 24

                                Items like these are why I like lobsters. Can’t imagine sending this to my friends, but here, it’s cool.

                                1. 5

                                  This describes my feelings as a user of software quite well, as a developer of software I try to incorporate all of those points. Sadly it feels like I’m the only one. All other developers I know feel way more for short term developer comfort, New resume driven frameworks or whatever rewrite they can force through.

                                  1. 7

                                    If Firefox wants to get users back from chrome, maybe they shouldn’t exclude extensions, even though they work fine. I really don’t like the fact that after an auto upgrade from the play store my browser broke. Yeah yeah new features and fixes, nobody cares if the thing you want to use, just stops working with no way to revert it. please Focus on that instead of developer comfort.

                                    1. 2

                                      This new submission describes my feelings quite well: http://jacquesmattheij.com/why-johnny-wont-upgrade/

                                    1. 1

                                      I have written something similar to back up photos using these APIs. From what I recall, it isn’t possible to get a completely undoctored copy (it is a rencoded JPEG, modified EXIF and other data) of what you uploaded originally? I think for that you need to arrange a Google Takeout, which sadly you cannot seem to do programmatically.

                                      1. 1

                                        As far as I can see, mounting an iPhone on Ubuntu and downloading a photo this way, they give the same md5sum. I do however have original quality uploads enabled and pay for extra storage. Videos I’m not sure.

                                      1. 1

                                        Does this work for ARM synology products as well? I can’t seem to find docker on the ds2018j, the cheapo version.

                                        1. 1

                                          Synology lists the products Docker is officially supported on here: https://www.synology.com/en-global/dsm/packages/Docker

                                          This seems like a decent guide (albeit from 2017 and some of the steps clearly don’t work anymore) for trying to get it installed manually if you just want to try: https://tylermade.net/2017/09/28/how-to-install-docker-on-an-unsupported-synology-nas/

                                          1. 1

                                            I’m not sure to be honest, sorry.

                                            1. 1

                                              Synology only supports Docker on their Intel models.

                                            1. 11

                                              I see a fundamental disconnect here.

                                              Automatic updates are baked into snap’s DNA. If you didn’t want this, simply don’t install the snap.

                                              Choosing this medium to install your dev environment and then getting cranky when it does precisely what it was meant to do seems a bit unintentionally disingenuous to me.

                                              I’m not necessary arguing for the correctness of Canonical’s choices around snaps here, because I have mixed feelings about them myself, but they make it pretty clear at every available opportunity that this is how they work.

                                              On a more helpful note, have you tried setting the refresh.hold system wide configurable which you could set to an arbitrary date years in the future?

                                              1. 24

                                                There’s another part to the disconnect: Ubuntu is trying to replace the deb parts of (large parts of) its ecosystem with snap equivalents. Putting these two things together makes the picture pretty interesting. How are LTS releases supposed to work with this kind of setup? I’ve had bugfix releases of software introduce bugs that blocked my work. Not often, but it does happen.

                                                Operationally, I wish updates were always automatically-update-on-a-schedule-I-define, a la Patch Tuesday or something similar. That seems like the only possible sane option, but it seems tragically rare.

                                                1. 4

                                                  That’s interesting I’d only heard of them doing this with Chrome. What else are you referring to if you don’t mind my asking?

                                                  For sure there are going to be problems as this is absolutely a radical departure from traditional UNIX vendor app update strategies.

                                                  Their assertion is that the auto-update feature was a key blocker to bring third party vendors who otherwise wouldn’t even consider supporting the Ubuntu platform to do so.

                                                  I think there’s some value in that, but as you say there are definitely kinks to be worked out here. On the up side the Ubuntu folks are pretty good about engaging with the community. I’d suggest pinging Snapcraft or Alan Pope on Twitter. It’s not his job but he’s often good about taking the time to help people past snap difficulties.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    That’s interesting I’d only heard of them doing this with Chrome. What else are you referring to if you don’t mind my asking?

                                                    My main source is https://lobste.rs/s/9q0kta/linux_mint_drops_ubuntu_snap_packages, which links to https://lwn.net/Articles/825005/. Chromium seems to be the main program currently, but the LWN article mentions work ongoing to apply it to other things like gnome-software. Seems safe to assume that the trend is going to continue.

                                                    Now that I think of it, I think part of the disconnect is that vendors think of their software as an end-product that nothing else depends on, so Slack or Spotify or whatever can update their own little worlds without affecting anything else. In the real world however, people script things to download stuff from Slack or ask Spotify to do things, and so those applications changing can break others’ functionality. Even non-techies do this, mentally; how many people have complained to tech support when a silent, undesired application update “moved that damn button” and broke their workflow?

                                                    1. 2

                                                      I would urge you to be sure to get both sides of the story on the Mint snap amputation.

                                                      I don’t have any issue with the decision itself per se but the way they handled it was IMO very unfortunate and unprofessional.

                                                      Specifically, the Ubuntu folks said they were totally willing to work with Mint to accomplish the removal in a clean way that makes sense technically, but that they were never approached.

                                                      IMO when you choose to base your Linux distribution on an upstream distro, you agree to abide by the technical decisions that upstreeam makes, or at least to work with them in evolving your remix/flavor in a way that makes sense. None of that happened here.

                                                    2. 3

                                                      LXD is another example

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Yes. The differences betwen Docker and LXD are interesting. Docker provides a convenient packaging format and allows for layering of components to create application stacks.

                                                        LXD seems to want you to start out with a single image and seems to have better / more / deeper integration with system services like networking.

                                                        I’d love to see someone do an in depth technical comparison of thw two technologies.

                                                    3. 1

                                                      Ubuntu is trying to replace the deb parts of (large parts of) its ecosystem with snap equivalents.

                                                      I’ve only seen evidence of this in the packages that are particularly challenging to maintain as debs due to the way particular upstreams operate. Browsers are an example where security backports aren’t feasible so the debs that have been shipped by most distributions have for years been “fat” anyway. Snaps are mainly solving the problems of IoT device updates, third party (both Free and proprietary) software distribution directly to users and the areas where debs are a poor fit, such as shipping wholesale featureful updates to users such as with web browsers. The traditional deb parts are not affected.

                                                      Operationally, I wish updates were always automatically-update-on-a-schedule-I-define, a la Patch Tuesday or something similar.

                                                      You can configure snaps to do that that: https://snapcraft.io/docs/keeping-snaps-up-to-date#heading--controlling-updates

                                                      Disclosure: I’m a Canonical employee and Ubuntu developer (and a Debian developer, if we’re going there). I’m not involved in snap architecture at Canonical (though I do maintain some snaps as I do debs in Debian!).

                                                    4. 7

                                                      Choosing this medium to install your dev environment and then getting cranky when it does precisely what it was meant to do seems a bit unintentionally disingenuous to me.

                                                      Agree. So what I say below doesn’t apply to the situation in the article.

                                                      but they make it pretty clear at every available opportunity that this is how they work.

                                                      They may make it clear how they work but they don’t make pretty clear when you are installing a snap. Starting Ubuntu 20.04 they’ve started installing snaps when you install a Deb

                                                      https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3906

                                                      1. 7

                                                        The reason the snap is installed is because the chromium browser moved to a snap so we could iterate faster and consume fewer developer resources packaging a non-default web browser for multiple releases. If we didn’t have the deb to snap migration in 19.10 (and 20.04) then users upgrading from 19.04 to 19.10 or from 18.04 to 20.04 would lose their browser.

                                                        I wrote a blog post 6 months ago about why this was done. https://ubuntu.com/blog/chromium-in-ubuntu-deb-to-snap-transition

                                                        We decided at the time not to punch people in the face during the upgrade and make them choose “Do you want to keep your browser, by migrating to the snap?” because those kind of mid-upgrade dialogs are pretty awful for end users. Generally the vast majority of the audience don’t actually care what packaging scheme is used. They just want to click the browser icon and it open.

                                                        Yes, we could have communicated it better. We’re working on improving it for the 20.04.1 update which is due next week. We certainly do listen to the feedback we get.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          We decided at the time not to punch people in the face during the upgrade and make them choose “Do you want to keep your browser, by migrating to the snap?”

                                                          You could use the motd announcements to give people ample notice.

                                                          1. 3

                                                            Good idea, but most normals don’t ever see motd.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              normals? Normies perhaps?

                                                        2. 4

                                                          Please see my answer above to icefox’s assertion along the same lines. This is only for Chromium, and there are good reasons behind that choice (They were spending vast amounts of engineering time JUST on chromium).

                                                          As I said in that response, IMO Linux Mint is very much in the wrong here, and has handled the situation abysmally. They could have enacted the removal of snaps/snapd in a much cleaner way without all the drama, and they chose not to do that.

                                                          Unfortunate.

                                                          1. 5

                                                            Please see my answer above to icefox’s assertion along the same lines.

                                                            Yeah, I saw it after I had posted this comment.

                                                            This is only for Chromium, and there are good reasons behind that choice

                                                            You are conflating two separate things. There may be good reasons™ behind packing Chromium as a snap only. There is no good reason to do so behind the users back. If one uses apt to install something one most certainly doesn’t expect to be installing a snap.

                                                            What you chose to call ‘drama’ is a political stance. The issue was not “to accomplish the removal in a clean way”. It was “This breaks one of the major worries many people had when Snap was announced and a promise from its developers that it would never replace APT.”. You may not like or agree with that position but there is nothing wrong with that.

                                                            Also it is disingenuous to think this will stop at Chromium. Chromium is just for testing the waters.

                                                        3. 5

                                                          Refresh.hold is stated in the article, it does not honor dates further than 60 days in the future.

                                                          1. 8

                                                            Did you try snap revert?

                                                            e.g.

                                                            # What version do I have installed?
                                                            $ snap info caprine | tail -n 1
                                                            installed:          2.47.0            (37) 66MB -
                                                            # Is there a pending update? (yes)
                                                            $ snap refresh --list | grep caprine
                                                            caprine             2.48.0                     38     sindresorhus  -
                                                            # Refresh blocked while app is running (experimental setting, should land "soon")
                                                            $ snap refresh caprine
                                                            error: cannot refresh "caprine": snap "caprine" has running apps (caprine)
                                                            # Let's kill the app
                                                            $ sudo killall caprine
                                                            # Try refreshing again
                                                            $ snap refresh caprine
                                                            caprine 2.48.0 from Sindre Sorhus (sindresorhus) refreshed
                                                            # Let's revert it because the update was terrible
                                                            $ snap revert caprine
                                                            caprine reverted to 2.47.0
                                                            

                                                            I appreciate you’re “burned” by this and will likely switch to Mint, so this information may be academic, but for others stumbling on this thread it may be handy. Hope Linux Mint works out for you.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              I’d not expect the Allen Pope to respond, you only exist in my podcasts :). How cool!

                                                              Now on point, also responding to the revert comment earlier. I did find that, but my point is about not being able to disable updates, not about not being able to rollback. Rolling back would not have been necessary if I could have done the update manually in two weeks, after which the plugins of the IDE would probably have been updated as well. I do however appreciate the option to rollback.

                                                              You also state that there are ways to disable updates and give the example of sideloading an application, after which it never gets updated. That also is not my main gripe. I do want my cake and eat it, but not automatically. As in, I want to update when I’m ready and expect it, not changing the engine while the car is driving on the highway.

                                                              Is there an official way to disable automatic updates? However hard to setup, with big red flashing warnings, promising my firstborn to whatever deity? Setting a proxy or hosts file might stop working, an “official” way would still give me all the other benefits of snaps.

                                                              As said, I do like updates and easy of use (not manually sideloading ever snap, just apt upgrade all the things) with just a bit more control.

                                                              1. 6

                                                                Haha! I’m just some guy, you know.

                                                                There’s currently no way to fully disable completely all updates. I appreciate that’s hard news to take. However, I have been having many conversations at Canonical internally about the biggest pain points, and this is clearly one. Perhaps we could add a big red button marked “Give Alan all my cats, and also disable updates forever”. Perhaps we could really forcefully nag you with irritating popups once you get beyond the 60 days limit that’s currently set, I don’t know. But I agree, something needs to be done here, especially for desktop users who are super sticky on particular releases of their favorite tools.

                                                                It’s Friday night, and I’m enjoying family time, but rest assured I’ll bring it up again in our meetings next week.

                                                                Have a great weekend.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  What about a big button to disable automatic updates, and then give initially gentle, gradually escalating nags once updates are available?

                                                                  Maybe in the handy “Software Manager” popup UI we’ve already got built. Checkboxes to select which ones you want to update. Make it really easy to “accept all”, after my workday is over.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    This sounds okay in a comment.

                                                                    Did you use windows 10? Did you read the comments when Microsoft did similar? They were heavily criticised there was a vocal cohort of users annoyed even by that. When I was near a deadline and my windows told me I cannot postpone updates anymore and broke my flow I happened to understand them.

                                                                    This is a hard UX problem, despite how simple one might initially see it.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      It is a problem but not that hard. A simple matter of control. Do I update or not? .hold? Then not. It’s perfectly feasible to add a ..hold.forever. Your workflow is not broken sms 99%of average Joes have the latest everything.

                                                                      Now, this is just my opinion as am old schooler used to absolute control of my computing. I gladly let everything be automated until i don’t.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        It is hard of you wish to please a wide range of users, ranging from novices to power users, and wish to provide a UI serving the different needs of these different cohorts. I mean it is hard if you want to do it well. :) Microsoft tried hard, and did not get it IMHO. Other vendors fail even more miserably.

                                                                  2. 3

                                                                    Thank you for the time you take in the replies here. Enjoy your weekend!

                                                              2. 1

                                                                You’re quite right. I apologize for having missed this in my initial read.

                                                              3. 4

                                                                Automatic updates are baked into snap’s DNA. If you didn’t want this, simply don’t install the snap.

                                                                Choosing this medium to install your dev environment and then getting cranky when it does precisely what it was meant to do seems a bit unintentionally disingenuous to me.

                                                                I’ve seen snaps come up on lobsters before but had no idea that they automatically update with no option to disable the updates. I thought they were basically like Canonical-flavored docker containers.

                                                                Thankfully I saw this post before I update my laptop next week. I’ll be avoiding Ubuntu and their snaps for now.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I’ve seen snaps come up on lobsters before but had no idea that they automatically update with no option to disable the updates. I thought they were basically like Canonical-flavored docker containers.

                                                                  Couple of important differences between Docker and snaps.

                                                                  Docker containers leverage Linux’s cgroups feature to offer each container it’s own pretty much complete Linux userland.

                                                                  So that means that you can, as a for instance, have 3 containers all running on a Fedora system, one Alpine Linux, another Ubuntu, and a third something else.

                                                                  Snaps, on the other hand, are application containers. They just bundle the application itself and any libraries that are necessary to run it.

                                                                  Thankfully I saw this post before I update my laptop next week. I’ll be avoiding Ubuntu and their snaps for now.

                                                                  And that’s the beauty of the Linux ecosystem right? :) I’d guess more people on here are Debian or maybe Arch users :)

                                                                2. 1

                                                                  If you didn’t want this, simply don’t install the snap.

                                                                  I think a large part of the criticism is that it gets installed automatically; and if you remove it it keeps getting reinstalled anyway.

                                                                  have you tried setting the refresh.hold system wide configurable which you could set to an arbitrary date years in the future

                                                                  Have you actually tried reading the article? It’s literally mentioned in there.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    I don’t see anything in the article suggesting a snap gets automatically re-installed after removal? Can you please elaborate?

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      I did read the article but missed that detail. Thanks for pointing that out.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I hope the source becomes available. I love the look!

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      Fun fact, in the Debian bug report, the author of pygopherd (John)!states that he is working on a python3 version. I hope it adds ipv6 support as well.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        I believe on the gopher mailing list the author stated ongoing frustrations with the upgrade to python3 and was seeking a new maintainer of the code-base. There were several replies and other packages discussed adding support for some of the specific older specialty types/formats (.link & .cap perhaps?) that pygopherd was handling. Geomyidae (from the bitreich community) and bucktooth (floodgap) were mentioned, but I haven’t followed up on progress.

                                                                        If you’re not married to pygopherd specifically, you might try gophernicus, bucktooth, geomyidae, or motsognir instead.