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    Interesting. For whatever reason a vast majority of industries just flat out refuse to upgrade from Windows XP either because they threw all their money at a system that isn’t going to be updated anymore or they don’t want to pay to migrate data from it to a new one. When you think about it, it’s a massive undertaking and poor planning of when to upgrade or scale.

    What’s shocking is even those that upgrade to Windows 7, still force the old classic XP theme to aid with less tech savvy employees. I always found that puzzling as it looks ugly… it’s more to appease those that complain everything has “changed”.

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      This is very misleading. From the long exchange in the Gist, to me this appears to be blown out of proportion. While I understand this guy’s point that it’s a “security” issue, it seems to be a feature that was implemented (as noted by DigitalOcean) to combat human error - oops I deleted that droplet, I need it back.

      I’ve created a few test droplets and removed them, I never really paid any attention to the fact that I can still recover them up until a certain time. This just sounds like someone unhappy with the feature. If that level of security and assurance is needed, I don’t think a VPS provider is where you should be looking to store your data in the first place.

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        Having worked for a large German web hosting company (providing virtual servers, shared hosting including email, MySQL databases, the usual stuff), I can tell you that whenever you have a large amount of users, you will always have quite a few users that accidentally delete some of their stuff, and want it back. And, of course, the users paying the least for the service scream the loudest (which shows in negative comments on web forums and social media and definitely has an effect on the company’s reputation), so you always implement some mechanism to make it possible to recover data that was “deleted”. And you usually do so by locking or disabling said data (making it inaccessible to the user), marking when it was disabled, and then delete after a certain period, e.g. after a month. Usually, most users will complain within a day or two to get their stuff recovered. Of course that’s not exactly cool for people who expect their data to be securely deleted immediately, but it greatly increases user satisfaction whenever users make mistakes and click the wrong buttons.

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        Although their announcement is more or less a press release, this actually can be of great use to me for work.

        As for practicality, the public sector has a lot of overhead governed by policies. I don’t see the one man IT guy (or girl) at town hall deploying this overnight. A large government or state agency, maybe. It’d be interesting to get this running on a Raspberry Pi and see how it preforms. Thanks for sharing!

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          Sounded like some less-than ethical reporting practices occurred to obtain information for the article. Interesting to see how all this is going to play out. This guy’s world is going to be turned upside down with media attention.

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            The idea is appealing, and the tour is very well done. I’m not sure I need this level of control, but it’s worth keeping in mind.

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              Exactly. I’d integrate them into a project to test out, although I can’t justify the cost, since I don’t need all that functionality yet.

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              This shows how government agencies, even municipalities, don’t adequately monitor their online presence for anomalies. Someone could easily act as a proxy between any of these text-a-tip numbers if they can get a listing to rank high or change a number online.

              I haven’t really come across spoofed map listings, although it seems like a problem Google needs to address with greater effort.