1. 4

    I’m very satisfied with https://github.com/debauchee/barrier (synergy fork/continuation).

    1. 4

      Barrier doesn’t switch monitors. You need a separate monitor (or monitors) for each machine.

      1. 2

        Ah, yes. Slightly different use cases, I guess.

      2. 2

        Haim’s solution is pretty ingenius, though!

        Now that I know of it, I wish there was a DDC/CI tool I could use on OpenBSD :^)

        1. 1

          Update to self.

          Found this tool - https://github.com/rockowitz/ddcutil - but it is Linux-only, at least for now.

      1. 17

        Here’s the summary of the licencing change:

        We are moving our Apache 2.0-licensed source code in Elasticsearch and Kibana to be dual licensed under Server Side Public License (SSPL) and the Elastic License, giving users the choice of which license to apply. This license change ensures our community and customers have free and open access to use, modify, redistribute, and collaborate on the code. It also [restricts] cloud service providers from offering Elasticsearch and Kibana as a service without contributing back

        I’m not clear on how this pairs with Drew’s summary of:

        Elastic is no longer open source [and] has spit in the face of every single one of 1,573 contributors

        The code that those folk wrote and contributed to still exists, right? Elastic is saying that further code that they themselves distribute, which includes code from those 1,573 contributors, will now be under some other licence. And I’ll grant that that’s not great, but Elastic isn’t sshing into all of your servers and deleting the code running on them. They aren’t retroactively undistributing or relicencing old code. They’re just releasing new code that they write under some other, less good, licence. Potential contributors going forward know that those are the terms going forward but the rug wasn’t pulled out from other them and they’re free to contribute to a fork instead, under whatever terms they like.

        I’m undoutedly missing all of the context so I feel like I’m missing out on what’s happening that’s so terrible.

        Yesterday I was offering beer at my bar for free and some folk kindly helped me develop the recipe and brew it. Today I’m going to start charging for it, and hey if you want to keep helping you’re welcome to but the old recipe’s still on the door outside if you want it. I don’t follow what’s worth being up in arms about.

        1. 7

          I was just trying to answer a similar comment in the HN thread when I got rate limited, so convenient that I can almost paste it into this thread instead :)

          The community is built around the upstream project, and has a lot invested in their continued existence as an open source entity. This move will force the community to start from scratch to build a new entity which continues to meet those guarantees - something Elastic plans to capitalize on by capturing more users on its paid offering while the open source community struggles to set up a new entity at the same level of sophistication from scratch.

          What Elastic done was within their rights, but it wasn’t right - so to speak.

          1. 4

            when I got rate limited

            Fun fact, HN does not actually have rate limiting for regular users. It’s only applied to a few users who are flagged by the mods as annoying, but where a ban would cause more trouble than it’s worth. Beyond that there’s the shadowban or insta-flagging of comments.

            If you get rate limited, it might be worth sending an email to the mods and asking what to change to get rid of it - that said, being rate limited on HN is something to be proud of ;)

            1. 10
              1. 7

                https://jcs.org/2012/06/13/hellbanned_from_hacker_news

                The last sentence of that post is the kicker.

                1. 3
                2. 6

                  They have a clickthrough rate limit, and because everything is form-based every click is a new page load. You can hit it pretty easily by hitting the comments link on like 10 posts. I’m not sure sure on how aggressive it is though, or if that’s what Drew is talking about.

                  1. 1

                    I can middle-click open the comments of the entire frontpage as fast as I can click and I don’t get rate limited. That said, the rate-limit for “troublesome” users applies not just to actions, but also to comments.

                    I do have enough karma to be able to downvote, though, so maybe that helps.

                    Your experience sounds like you’re on one of the lower ban levels.

                    1. 1

                      I wonder if it’s load-based. I was able to click through to the comments for nearly every article on the front page without issue. It may also depend on if you commented recently or something…

            1. 27

              /US/ computer science dept rankings. The USA is not the centre of the universe. It’s not even the centre of the Computer Science universe :)

              1. 6

                I guess what @pja is trying to say is something along the lines of

                The title should have read computer science open rankings in the USA

                It would be quite interresting to see a world ranking, indeed. Given that it isn’t explicit, it does seem a little clickbaity - I fell for it.

                1. 5

                  As an American, I’m offended by this statement!

                  1. 4

                    It’s not even the centre of the Computer Science universe :)

                    Remind me, I forget, which country are Google, Microsoft, Apple, Mozilla, Tesla, the Linux Foundation, and the FSF headquartered in again?

                    1. 12

                      Applied computing != computer science

                      1. 9

                        Where was the World Wide Web born? Where was Linux written?

                        I don’t see the point with this exercise.

                    1. 15

                      Regarding the gripe about Gemini - retrocomputing was never its goal. It was about reforming the browsing experience of the modern user, where code execution or unexpected downloads cannot happen behind your back. Guaranteed TLS was deemed table stakes - for each person who complains about it, there is another who would never touch Gemini if all/much of their browsing was trivially observable by third parties. Gemini was never intended to supplant gopher. The protocol author mentioned continues to maintain both gopher and gemini sites, and gopher would be the right choice when encryption is inappropriate, such as retrocomputing or amateur radio.

                      1. 8

                        From the Gemini FAQ:

                        Gemini may be of interest to people who are: […]

                        • Interested in low-power computing and/or low-speed networks

                        So it does seem that there’s some tension there…

                        1. 4

                          I don’t quite know what to think of the TLS requirement in Gemini, either, but low-power computing and/or low-speed networks doesn’t necessarily mean old computers and networks. Modern low-power machines with low-speed connections can handle TLS just fine. See e.g. this thread: https://lists.orbitalfox.eu/archives/gemini/2020/002466.html for an older example of someone running a Gemini client on an ESP32.

                          (Full disclosure: not under this alias – which, for better or for worse, I ended up using in some professional settings – but I am running a Gemini-related project. I have zero investment in it, it’s just for fun, and I was one coin toss away from using Gopher, I’m just sort of familiar with the protocol).

                          1. 1

                            Yes, I think it’s a relative statement as well. Low-power systems today are magnitudes more performant. The little 68030 I did some testing on takes over 20 seconds to complete a TLS 1.2 transaction, but even a few years old embedded systems today will run rings around that.

                            For retro systems, I still say Gopher is the best fit.

                          2. 2

                            Yes, contrasting this with @jcs’s post, it does look like a dichotomy.

                          3. 5

                            But then, why reinvent the wheel? Instead of implementing a whole new protocol, a more sensible decision would have been to simply develop a modern HTML 3.2 browser without the JS crap. Just freeze the pinnacle of HyperText before the web became the edge of Hell it is today.

                            1. 4

                              See the Gemini FAQ section 2.5

                              1. 4

                                My memories of those days weren’t so halcyon, just table soup.

                                1. 2

                                  It’s because the point of Gemini is to be intentionally exclusionary.

                                2. 2

                                  I agree about Gemini, The one thing I wish they had done differently is used much much simpler crypto for integrity and not bother about confidentiality. Pulling in TLS was a shame as it missed out on a great opportunity.

                                  1. 2

                                    So what crytpo, and what libraries for which languages exist for it? I ask because the wisdom is not to invent crypto, nor implement it yourself.

                                1. 4

                                  Q -> Ó and W -> Ł!? So obvious! Now, why didn’t I think of that!? ;^)

                                  Such a simple and elegant solution. Great idea!

                                  1. 9

                                    I’m gonna be that guy… it doesn’t work for me because I have JS off.

                                    I use a different browser for things that legitimately require JS, but this is just static content as far as I can tell.

                                    1. 10

                                      I’m gonna be that guy… it doesn’t work for me because I have JS off.

                                      Did you try enabling awk?

                                      1. 3

                                        *gawks at thread*

                                      2. 5

                                        Worse yet, not only it doesn’t work without JS, it doesn’t even tell the visitor that it needs JS to work—just looks broken.

                                        The idea to make a website for AWK the language may be a good one, though.

                                        1. 3

                                          … as long as it’s AWK, not GNU Awk :^)

                                          1. 1

                                            That reminds me of The Power of GNU AWK.

                                        2. 2

                                          I had the same issues - no content without JS.

                                          On one hand discussing the weird JS requirement has nothing to do with the original link. On the other hand being verbose about a bad page now is the only way we can influence what kind of quality we expect.

                                          1. 0

                                            It even does not work with html off! I just wanna text!

                                          1. 2

                                            Thanks for sharing @atharva! You reminded me of another RSVP software - speedreader - which I need to start using again! :^)

                                            1. 1

                                              Direct link can’t be done due to collateral damage.

                                              1. 4

                                                Is there a “best-of” or “significant changes” list for OpenBSD releases? The changelog is detailed, but it’s easy to miss something between the points one might not be familiar with.

                                                1. 3

                                                  An in-kernel WireGuard driver and TLSv1.3 being enabled in LibreSSL were the two things that stood out for me. Here’s the Undeadly article.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    undeadly.org usually has a list of the “highlights” in their articles about new releases. The one about 6.7 can be found here. I don’t see anything for 6.8 yet though.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      List of most significant innovations - https://www.openbsd.org/innovations.html

                                                      1. 3

                                                        I’m familiar with that page, it’s just not 6.8-specific.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Right, you’ve used plural releases and didn’t mention 6.8 specifically:

                                                          Is there a “best-of” or “significant changes” list for OpenBSD releases?

                                                          It’s either changelog - the plusXX.html pages - or the relase pages - XX.html - themselves. The latter is separated into sections in case you’d like to look at bugfixes, kernel, userland, etc.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I see why you thought that I was looking for something like innovations.html, the question was ambiously phrased.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Pretty neat! The UX is still a bit rough it seems…

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Still, much better than GnuPG ;^)

                                                      1. 1

                                                        And finally, font choice. The fastest, easiest, and most visible improvement you can make to your typography is to ignore the fonts already loaded on your computer (known as system fonts) and the free fonts that inundate the internet. Instead, buy a professional font (like those found in font recommendations). A professional font gives you the benefit of a professional designer’s skills without having to hire one.

                                                        Ouch! Donald Knuth et al. - you’re not worthy!

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Another way is to be explicit in saying what shell the terminal app should run.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Given that the article mentions brew, being explicit would break upon update + cleanup.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I’ve been using brew for years and haven’t had a problem. /usr/local/bin/zsh is a symlink for a reason.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Another way is to be explicit in saying what shell the terminal app should run.

                                                                Thought you meant:

                                                                /usr/local/Cellar/zsh/5.7.1/bin/zsh
                                                                

                                                                Did I misunderstand the above?

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I think GP is referring to, in this example, /usr/local/bin/zsh.

                                                          1. 6
                                                            readlink -f "${SHELL}"
                                                            

                                                            Which works on most modern Unix-like systems except… macOS, where readlink(1) doesn’t have -f option ;^) so

                                                            stat -F "${SHELL}"
                                                            

                                                            would probably be the closest thing.

                                                            1. 9

                                                              There’s no guarantee that $SHELL points to the currently running shell. It can point to literally anything.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Confusingly, my Thinkpad laptop keyboard has only an Enter key (which isn’t L-shaped, and doesn’t have a return arrow printed), but xev says it sends Return, and indeed it really does seem to act as a Return key in all the ways I can tell from Linux. I’ve been typing so long I don’t think I’ve ever bothered to look at the label on it before, and now I find it highly annoying!

                                                              1. 1

                                                                which isn’t L-shaped

                                                                The (IMO awful) L-shape is found on ISO layouts, while ANSI has the (good) single row key.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  The (IMO awful) L-shape is found on ISO layouts, while ANSI has the (good) single row key.

                                                                  Each to their own - I’ve learnt to always hit Return somewhere around its centre and usually miss it when typing on a keyboard with ANSI layout. There is no awful or good here my friend - just a matter of what one is used to.

                                                              1. 2
                                                                sudo pkill transmission && transmission-daemon
                                                                

                                                                That’s quite a hammer you’re using there - on a multi-user system, this would kill every user’s transmission process. You might want to think about more targeted approach and give it a chance to quite gracefully while you’re at it, i.e.:

                                                                pkill -INT -u $euid transmission
                                                                
                                                                1. 1

                                                                  pkill -INT -u $euid transmission

                                                                  This doesn’t seem to work because of $EUID which in this case is your RUID while the transmission-daemon is running as whatever default user it is defined to.

                                                                  Edit: Just tested and it doesn’t work

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    The use -U :^P

                                                                    Being root or using sudo will surely help if the process you’re trying to kill isn’t running under your own $(E)UID ;^)

                                                                    The above is simply an example that you can (and should!) be more careful at targetting your pkill commands when running as root or with sudo.

                                                                  2. 1

                                                                    transmisison

                                                                    There’s a small typo there! (not just here in the quote but in the article)

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      There’s a small typo there! (not just here in the quote but in the article)

                                                                      There is no typo here - I quoted the article verbatim. Go and complain there! :^P

                                                                      Don’t you have anything better to do? ;^)

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Edited! Happy!? :^)

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    beware of using transmission-cli though, it has been deprecated in favor of transmission-remote, and it’s less handy because it runs as a foreground process, so when you launch your torrents with transmission-cli, unless you add the ampersand (&) it will lock the current terminal (which is far from ideal if you’re using ssh).

                                                                    Deprecated it, indeed, is. As a general rule, though, that’s what a terminal multiplexer, i.e. tmux, is for :^)

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Fair enough :D but I guess my point is, you don’t really have a way to get the status of all the torrents in the same place.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      Is it more appropriate/desirable from your experience to have entire articles available in an RSS feed? I just show title, date, description. Not even image…

                                                                      1. 6

                                                                        Given that I use newsboat as my feed reader, I do appreciate when the whole article is included in the feed - it saves time more than anything. I’ll open it in a GUI web browser if there are images related to the content, though.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          I have too many feeds, and when I’m thinning them down the first ones to go are ones without full articles, or at least a few paragraphs.

                                                                        2. 2

                                                                          Yes, I prefer to read the entire article straight from my feed reader. I find it much less distracting than having to open a web browser, copy the link (I use newsbeuter, so links aren’t clickable) and visit the web site. Of course it doesn’t help that many websites aren’t exactly designed to be pleasant to read, just to look good (or to make money with distracting banners).

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Yes, I prefer to read the entire article straight from my feed reader.

                                                                            You and me both! :^)

                                                                            I use newsbeuter […]

                                                                            Ouch! From the very top of the README:

                                                                            ABANDONED! An actively maintained fork is available in newsboat repo

                                                                            […] so links aren’t clickable

                                                                            This is a feature of your $TERM, not feed reader.

                                                                            Of course it doesn’t help that many websites aren’t exactly designed to be pleasant to read, just to look good (or to make money with distracting banners).

                                                                            You can say that again! Unless there’s a really good article, linked from multiple sources, I never visit anything Medium-like.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Yikes, I didn’t know newsbeuter was abandoned. I just installed newsboat and was happy to see that it converted my newsbeuter config automatically. It’s truly a drop-in replacement! Thanks for the tip!

                                                                              This is a feature of your $TERM, not feed reader.

                                                                              Yeah, true. But if I was using a non-terminal based feed reader, it’d likely have clickable links.

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                But if I was using a non-terminal based feed reader, it’d likely have clickable links.

                                                                                However, you chose a terminal feed reader! If clickable links were a priority, you’d most likely go for a GUI option, no? ;^)

                                                                                Either way, it’s an easy fix :^)

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  haha, true that. But the point was about how it’s more convenient to read it in the reader anyway. That’s not an easy fix for me, but it is for the site’s author!

                                                                          2. 2

                                                                            I make everything available in RSS feeds.

                                                                            I read RSS heavily on my phone and love it when full feeds are available. I understand many news sites can’t do that, so in that case I am happy to subscribe for full feed (for eg Ars Technica) or just click through to open in browser.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              I don’t know if it is appropriate/desirable in general to include all content in the feed. I personally prefer feeds that include the full text. It seems that I am not the only one because there are commercial products that generate full text feeds from partial ones.

                                                                              My impression is that partial feeds became more popular with publishers as a way to prevent people to bypass their paywalls and/or to monetize page views on their main website. If you monetize your website, I would keep partial articles in your feed. If you don’t monetize it, I would suggest to include a full feed just to accommodate your readers that might prefer it.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              I remember the days when Chrome and Firefox both displayed RSS feeds for websites right in the browser.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  I remember the days when Chrome and Firefox both displayed RSS feeds for websites right in the browser.

                                                                                  That’s exactly waht the author mentions in the article:

                                                                                  RSS used to be displayed far more prominently in browsers. Firefox, Safari, and the Chromium-based browsers used to include RSS icons or text in their UIs that would activate upon detecting a page with the appropriate meta tag.

                                                                                  ;^)

                                                                                1. 6

                                                                                  Coincidently I’ve recently read about mailto links not being ideal and I think RSS feeds suffer from a similar problem: links to them are kind of useless beyond signaling their existence. I am much more inclined to plop the website’s URL in the RSS reader than copy the feed URL directly. There used to be the idea of a “feed://” scheme floating around, but I’m not sure if it has caught on.

                                                                                  1. 8

                                                                                    Coincidently I’ve recently read about mailto links not being ideal and I think RSS feeds suffer from a similar problem: links to them are kind of useless beyond signaling their existence.

                                                                                    In my experience, it’s the opposite - if the the feed icon/URL is not featured on the page I have to copy the site address, open the feed reader, paste it, pick the appropriate feed (RSS, Atom, comments, etc.) and finally add. With a direct link, all I need is to click on it and my reader opens automatically.

                                                                                    I am much more incline to plop the website’s URL in the RSS reader than copy the feed URL directly.

                                                                                    This is what I’m forced to do because most pages don’t feature direct feed URLs.

                                                                                    The problem is even worse when it comes to podcasts - one can find links to all sorts of iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, etc. but don’t have any desire to use any of it and frequently have to ask for a direct feed URL.

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      if the the feed icon/URL is not featured on the page I have to copy the site address, open the feed reader, paste it, pick the appropriate feed (RSS, Atom, comments, etc.) and finally add

                                                                                      This bugs me every time I have to do it. Plus, there’s a ~20% chance that the site doesn’t expose any type of feed, so I have to go to a workaround like politepol to follow the site :(

                                                                                      1. 6

                                                                                        This bugs me every time I have to do it. Plus, there’s a ~20% chance that the site doesn’t expose any type of feed, so I have to go to a workaround like politepol to follow the site :(

                                                                                        Don’t get me started about sites** without any type of feed.

                                                                                        So, you post stuff every so often and would, presumably, like some else to read it.

                                                                                        Sure.

                                                                                        Are you expecting me to visit every n days/weeks/months or script it?

                                                                                        Yeah, why not?

                                                                                        Thanks, but no thanks.

                                                                                        ** like with everything in life, there are, of course, exceptions :^)

                                                                                      2. 2

                                                                                        My experience chimes with this. I always copy and paste the feed URL. I even use this extension to show me feed links like Firefox used to.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          With a direct link, all I need is to click on it and my reader opens automatically.

                                                                                          Ah, that’s cool! Does it work with any old https:// link to a feed?

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            Does it work with any old https:// link to a feed?

                                                                                            Sure, as long as it is being served with the correct media type.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              Huh, on macOS I get three different behaviors in three different browsers for a MIME type of application/rss+xml:

                                                                                              • Firefox offers to download the file, or open it with… Sublime Text
                                                                                              • Safari invokes the RSS reader (NetNewsWire)
                                                                                              • Chrome loads the feed as plain text

                                                                                              Since I use FF day to day, this behavior might have colored my impression of RSS feed URLs.

                                                                                              It would be interesting to see how https:// vs. feed://, text/xml vs application/rss+xml behave in the year 2020, and which version (or combination) offers the broadest convenience.

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                You can change the file type’s associated program in FF’s Preferences.

                                                                                        2. 1

                                                                                          Coincidently I’ve recently read about mailto links not being ideal

                                                                                          That was a fascinating insight into the average user. In every desktop browser I’ve used, right-clicking on a mailto link gives an option of copying the address (often it includes the mailto: prefix, but that’s easy to trim after you paste). I’d never have thought about trying to copy the text because that requires accurately hitting the start and end, whereas right-clicking requires me to hit somewhere in the link. A copy button is potentially a good idea, but I am quite reluctant to encourage untrusted web sites to be able to write things to my clipboard. As far as I know, there are Chrome and Firefox plugins that will allow you to forward mailto links to a webmail client and it surprises me that people who use webmail wouldn’t set these up - I remember this being a problem 20 years ago but largely a solved issue 15 years ago. Does Chrome really not integrate with Gmail?

                                                                                          The article asks why browsers removed the RSS button. I know why this happened in Safari because Apple talked about it publicly. The user experience for RSS depends on being able to see new things easily. That doesn’t work well when you read feeds on multiple devices unless you have some mechanism for syncing the ‘read’ state across devices. Apple didn’t have that and didn’t want a core feature of the browser to depend on iCloud. The popular RSS readers were all server-side things that kept track of what you’d read centrally. These could ship a browser plugin that detected the RSS feeds and let you add it to your list, so this didn’t need to be core browser functionality. A quick look in the Chrome store implies that only feeder.co actually does this.

                                                                                        1. 14

                                                                                          If you want to run your own version, I can highly recommend the independent rust server implementation here: https://github.com/dani-garcia/bitwarden_rs

                                                                                          Very easy to set up and compatible with the browser extensions, android app etc.

                                                                                          I have been using this for month running it on a raspberry pi behind a VPN at home (with encrypted offsite backup). Works like a charm

                                                                                          1. 6

                                                                                            Or, you can use @jcs’s rubywarden.

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              I am trying out bitwarden_rs now and do feel the same usability as the mainstream software. do you have any feedback about rubywarden regarding existing features, usability compared to the main software, and mostly, maintenance tips? thanks!

                                                                                            2. 4

                                                                                              I run this in a docker container alongside watchtower to keep it up to date. Runs like a champ, I hardly ever have to touch it.

                                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                                same here. I am not a fan of docker in general, but trying to compile this myself on a raspi tipped me over the edge towards using docker for this.