1. 23

    I gues it’s better to leave on your own terms than to get your domain blocked or get kicked out.

    The wording on the banner is far from being a friendly advice - I’d call it antagonistic and confrontational, hostile even.

    BTW, the code itself has been added last year in this commit.

    Ironically, lobste.rs was created by /u/jcs as response to HN heavy-handed moderation.

    1. 40

      His engagement with lobste.rs was much more polarising than burntsushi. The latter didn’t jump into comment sections to deliberately kick off a flame war that may not have otherwise occurred; the former did so deliberately and unashamedly. I heartily respect both their views but I can understand why they might be moderated differently.

      1. 13

        Thank you for saying this in a far more polite way than I was about to.

        1. 8

          And why would that result in banning the domain? Drew wasn’t even the one posting his blog posts here and they were always upvoted.

          1. 11

            Because many of his posts were explicit flamebait; look at the last two posts on that domain for instance.

            1. 2

              Then clearly this community is not what the admin intended it to be before banning this domain because the stories from that domain were routinely getting above 30 points which is rare for most stories. It is time to shut this whole website down and just change it to be a private RSS feed of the admin.

              1. 3

                It’s an attempt to avoid the Repugnant Conclusion; the mere addition of a steady attractor of upvotes can degrade the quality of life for everybody else.

              2. 1

                Did you mean to include the one about a finger server and io_uring as one of the two? I found it interesting and informative.

                1. 5

                  I meant what was submitted to Lobsters, which were the final straws,

                  1. 2

                    Thanks for the clarification. Not sure why I didn’t read it that way.

            2. 1

              This was just an example - there’s more in the moderation log if you care to look.

            3. 15

              Wow, this ban message from your second link:

              Please go be loudly disappointed in the entire world (and promote sourcehut) somewhere else.

              I really hope that this happened at the end of a process of attempting to politely engage, rather than as the immediate response. That reads like something from a burned-out moderator who needs to take a break.

              1. 26

                This was a sustained pattern of behavior over months.

                1. 2

                  That reads like something from a burned-out moderator who needs to take a break.

                  Pro tip: moderators are always burnt-out.

                2. 7

                  There are two issues here:

                  • banning the user
                  • banning the domain

                  The reason for banning the user account was reported by the admin as apparently rude comments/encouraging arguments/arguing? The comments were usually upvoted though as far as I remember so I think the decision was mostly arbitrary.

                  The domain was blocked just because the admin banned the author from lobsters, not because there was something wrong with the content on that website. Drew wasn’t even the one posting his blog posts here.

                  Therefore at least one of those decisions is nonsensical.

                  You can try to create a website with semi-transparent moderation policies but that will never fix the standard power abuse by moderators like in this situation. The personal grievances usually win and no moderation log will fix this. The community enjoyed the content and @pushcx didn’t => the comments and the domain get nuked off the website.

                  I tried to get an answer at least to why the domain was banned but of course I never did (in the name of transparency).

                  1. 3

                    The reason for banning the user account was reported by the admin as apparently rude comments/encouraging arguments/arguing? The comments were usually upvoted though as far as I remember so I think the decision was mostly arbitrary.

                    The domain was blocked just because the admin banned the author from lobsters, not because there was something wrong with the content on that website. Drew wasn’t even the one posting his blog posts here.

                    I disagree with your opinion that his behavior on the site was not rude, though I didn’t look closely at all of his posts so I can’t say for certain. What I do agree with is the domain ban. The ban itself seemed unclear and arbitrary. Moreover, as you mentioned, a domain ban affects much more than just a user, it affects all content on that domain.

                    1. 1

                      Negative comments are deleted when users are banned or leave; you won’t find any of his egregious comments here.

                  2. 7

                    oh wow, Drew got banned ..

                    I don’t like anyone getting banned for anything. I have a lot of respect for how much DeVault puts into his open source contributions and am envious he can live off of it. That being said, he banned me on Mastodon forever ago because I reposted an open letter a professor made during the eight of the 2020 US riots. We had a discussion over DMs and he blocked me in the end.

                    The more I lean about some of the stuff he’s said and done, I realize I can still respect his work while still agreeing with all the others who’ve come to the conclusion his actions are often inflammatory or childish. I’m not surprised he’s banned. He left the Fediverse a few months back too.

                    1. 12

                      Yup. I was actually pretty interested in Sourcehut, but in the end I didn’t really want to use a service run by someone that hot-headed.

                      1. 1

                        because I reposted an open letter a professor made during the eight of the 2020 US riots. We had a discussion over DMs and he blocked me in the end.

                        What was the nature of the letter?

                      2. 5

                        For my sins I’m tracking every submission to lobste.rs.

                        Here’s a gist with an extract of submissions matching ‘drewdevault’ in the URL. I consider a comments/score ration above 1.25 “controversial”.

                        Hopefully this can give a sampling of how Devault’s content was received by the community here.

                      1. 2

                        Running OpenBSD on an RPI3 is much easier than it seems, only non-standard RPI requirement is doing an actual install from the SD card and requiring a serial terminal our external monitor/keyboard instead of just flashing an image and booting.

                        One trick I ended up doing post-install was mounting /tmp as type mfs to avoid writes to the SD card when possible.

                        It’s overall stable and there are a good number of arm64 pkgs to install and setup smaller network appliances like a dnscrypt-proxy or a gemini capsule.

                        1. 1

                          terminal

                          s/terminal/console/

                        1. 7

                          I had to do some digging through the linked tweets to figure out what Proctorio was. If the author is reading, it might be worth giving a brief summary of the technology you’re criticizing for those unfamiliar with it.

                          1. 1

                            Yup, it does seem to be (un)popular in a specific country or a region.

                          1. 6

                            I just use a shell scripts with defaults write commands and for software, I use a Brewfile for Homebrew. Mostly works well.

                            1. 3

                              Same here - /bin/sh script with lots of defaults, installer, etc. lines. Assembled over the years, one-touch CLI-only setup - does 100% of what I need it to do.

                              Hooking all of the work Macs up to an existing SaltStack server has been on my TODO list for a while now but it’s always on the back burner.

                              1. 3

                                If you install the mas package, your Brewfile will have the versions of software you’ve downloaded from the Mac App Store. It’s pretty nice.

                                1. 4

                                  Jakub Konka! Can’t you read!? ;^)

                                1. 2

                                  It’s a shame there’s no standard way to filter emails… oh, wait!

                                  1. 2

                                    sieve.info

                                    Now that’s a name I’ve not heard in a long time…

                                    1. 1

                                      I use it every day and can’t imagine how one can use email effectively without it :^)

                                      1. 1

                                        We used it at $work[-1]. Sadly it was the only sane part of that particular setup.

                                  1. 2

                                    Also macOS still doesn’t support it with the included OpenSSH.

                                    1. 1

                                      What else is new!? ;^)

                                      brew install openssh
                                      
                                    1. 12

                                      Seems like a lot more hassle than just using Bitwarden, be it cloud, or self-hosted. especially on mobile. Plus even if not as secure, 2FA in bitwarden is great

                                      1. 5

                                        It’s more initial setup, but after that point depending upon your workflow it can be less hassle. In my case I’ve got it hooked up with fzf in my TWM so it’s more efficient than any proprietary UI could ever be. And long term there’s less hassle in using standard, multipurpose, open source tools like gpg and git.

                                        1. 5

                                          Oh, I would be totally onboard, but since I use passwords and 2fa on mobile a lot, not having the autofill capabilities on that app the article linked is a bit of a hinderance, along with other niceties. For my usecases, bitwarden is open source enough to satisfy that.

                                          But if I think about it, I can see the benefit in the simplicity of this workflow if you don’t need the features I depend on, or they extra app switching doesn’t bother you.

                                          I tried pass a long time ago, probably around when it first came out and liked it, just mobile was always a sticking point, and syncing everything. I mean thats solved with stuff like Seafile, Nextcloud, dropbox, syncthing, rsync, etc. But it being built into what I am using is just a time saver.

                                          I will also admit hat I am not as privacy-conscious as many are.

                                          1. 11

                                            Hi, Android Password Store maintainer here. The app does support Autofill, and does it rather well (even if I say so myself).

                                            I assume the author is on a very old Android version which doesn’t have native Autofill capabilities. The mention of overlays probably is about System Alert Windows, which apps used pre-Android 8.0 to present Autofill UIs. The accessibility and clipboard backed implementation that was used before native Autofill is extremely buggy and unsafe, so we’ve opted to completely remove it in our development branch.

                                            Another possibility is that they accidentally installed our legacy version that hasn’t been updated in a couple years, and was marked as archived on F-Droid but I presume stays accessible even today. Here’s the currently maintained version.

                                            If neither of them are true /u/rhardih, please email me at aps@msfjarvis.dev with some info about your phone and Android version, and I’d love to sort this out :)

                                            1. 4

                                              Hi, this was totally a blunder on my part. I didn’t see it showing up in the Autofill menu next to LastPass and didn’t really think about it more than that, because I personally didn’t mind having to copy paste a bit.

                                              I’m guessing it’s disabled by default, because it’s necessary to trigger the “Auto-fill service” system settings page when enabling, in order to choose Password Store as default.

                                              I’m sorry for the misunderstanding. I’ve updated the post with a correction.

                                              1. 3

                                                Thanks for the prompt correction! We recommend users to enable Autofill from within the app since it allows us to present each currently installed browser’s Autofill support level upfront, so that users can adjust their expectations. This was mostly necessary back when Chromium-based browsers had absolutely terrible Autofill support, but is slightly less useful now that all the patches my co-maintainer has been pushing to Chromium have reached the stable channel with Chrome 89.

                                              2. 2

                                                Oh, cool, thank you for clarifying that and thank you for working on the app. I know it might not be for some, but it definitely solves a need for many, and I respect that and appreciate your efforts on the app.

                                                I might check it out for work related stuff.

                                                1. 2

                                                  Thanks a lot for your kind words :)

                                          2. 2

                                            It isnt. I host my password store on a git directory on my server and just use that to keep it updated on my phone and anything else. I also use rofi so having pass-otp and rofi-pass really makes it great on my desktop for example. The android app also just works with otp codes.

                                            1. 1

                                              I’m also in favour of a more seamless setup and am heading towards Bitwarden setup myself, albeit slowly.

                                              Recently, I’ve been made aware of a 3rd-party command line client for Bitwarden - rbw - it lacks some basic functionality, i.e. one can only edit the pass{word,phrase}, but it’s quite usable otherwise.

                                            1. 1

                                              Does anyone know the backstory on this one? Did I miss Internet Drama™?

                                              1. 4

                                                other thread: https://lobste.rs/s/cqdh3x/wireguard_for_freebsd_development_for_13

                                                No idea of the veracity of any of the below…

                                                some backstory: https://bugs.freebsd.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=247853#c7

                                                more backstory: https://lists.zx2c4.com/pipermail/wireguard/2021-March/006494.html

                                                even more: https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-hackers/2021-March/057082.html

                                                yellow site thread: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=26475519

                                                Do note: FWIW, Netgate does seem (at least from my perspective) to have a bit of a history of being kind of… weirdly hostile about some stuff? Example: whole opnsense badmouthing thing (domain registration, reddit community creation, etc). On the other hand, also known for contributing code to FreeBSD and donating to FreeBSD. Unsure what to make of it.

                                                1. 3

                                                  From my perspective, it was great that Netgate got the ball rolling on in-kernel FreeBSD wireguard. They clearly have a commercial stake in it but they contributed it to the FreeBSD project, even if it lacked important features (jail support) and they just dropped off the code and walked.

                                                  Clearly there were code quality and some security issues and Netgate was caught off guard and embarrassed, which no one likes to be. To me the part that is the worst of all of this is what Scott tried to pull in his private communication to Jason:

                                                  On Mon, Mar 15, 2021 at 6:08 PM Scott Long wrote:

                                                  I’ve also spoken with the FreeBSD Security Officer, and we’ve agreed that wireguard will be removed from all branches of FreeBSD until further notice. I’ve also informed Kyle of this. I do not support its reintroduction into FreeBSD, whether in the src tree or in the ports tree, at this time. As for pfSense, we are conducting an audit and will decide on the best course of action for our customers and our company.

                                                  That sort of “take the ball and go home” shit is not at all professional and trying to lean on the security team to enforce your grudge is messed up.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I also feel like calling out the original status of that patch was correct. Some of the issues (like sleeping against race conditions, copying 40KLOC from linux and put a bunch of ifdefs around) have a very bad taste for me.

                                                  2. 3

                                                    The Ars Technica article that forms the base of the HN submission is pretty good, IMO: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/03/in-kernel-wireguard-is-on-its-way-to-freebsd-and-the-pfsense-router/

                                                    1. 2

                                                      yellow site thread: […]

                                                      Surely, you meant orange, no? ;^)

                                                      1. 1

                                                        haha. Indeed!

                                                  1. 6

                                                    I admire Jason’s commitment and approach to doing things. Given this experience, this makes me wonder about the quality of code in FreeBSD for other protocols.

                                                    1. 6

                                                      I’d just like to understand how the code got committed to the mainline branch/trunk if it was of such low quality?

                                                      I’m certain I’m missing something here but I’m also too busy to go digging around in the repo history + mailing lists to piece together the full story.

                                                      1. 8

                                                        In BSDs the main branch is the development branch. If we’re not sure something is ready to be used in production, but is under active development, it will be committed to the main branch, but is either not hooked up to build or otherwise disabled by default. This is to facilitate testing and review and contributions from others who want to test the system as it evolves (“those who run -CURRENT”).

                                                        I’m a NetBSD developer, not a FreeBSD developer, so I’m not an authoritative source on their development process. Jason has also objected to NetBSD independently developing a “WireGuard compatible VPN interface” (note the name of the specification is a registered trademark) without his oversight, and then not responded when asked to state his exact problem with the code or identify exact bugs for more than 6 months. The implication that the specification is complex or incomplete enough that his involvement in any implementation is required is worrying at best, but definitely good for job security (though it’s also worth noting serious bugs have been found in implementations he did spend a year visiting developers’ homes for).

                                                        1. 6

                                                          For the audience at home, here is the thread. I think Jason looks somewhat suspicious in it, with how he makes vague threads and claims about NetBSD’s implementation, but can’t point out anything concrete.

                                                          1. 5

                                                            If you read the linked thread, as well other *BSDs’ mailing lists, you can clearly see that he doesn’t consider anything he hasn’t personally touched to be worthy. WireGuard is clearly his baby - he’s both the author of the specification as well as reference implementation… problem is, that he doesn’t like any other (competing?) implementations of any sort. He actually makes it quite clear that WireGuard isn’t an RFC-style protocol - and every single implementation seems to need his personal blessing.

                                                            In that particular thread, it very much looks like he barges in both barrels blazing and makes demands such as Revert this code at once, sir! (I’m paraphrasing here) without actually spending some time reading how development is done in NetBSD - even after they, repeatedly(sic!), try to tell him this is the development branch.

                                                            For the record, the right thing to do would be to have sought input from the WireGuard project during those two years, which we would have enthusiastically provided, and maybe NetBSD would have this ready to go years ago. It strikes the project as rude that you’d write some halfbaked code and try to pass it off as “wireguard”, ruining what to date has been a uniform experience for users in using WireGuard across platforms. The fact is, you jumped the gun and didn’t reach out beyond your community.

                                                            […]

                                                            Again, while I’m not happy with this situation and the inflexibility here, […]

                                                            Who’s being rude and inflexible here?

                                                            Beyond the offers of help, time, energy, enthusiasm(!?), etc. all I can read between the lines are ego, grandeur, and the need for benediction.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              That is really bad behavior – it’s full-on micro-management that is really destroying any kind of relationships in the long run. I hope Jason will learn to let go, as this will just erode the trust and fail to create a progressive community around WireGuard.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                I’ve been talking with him (Jason) in private and can vouch for him. There’s more that’s going on that meets the eye.

                                                            2. 2

                                                              Ah - that makes perfect sense. Thanks for the explanation and additional context.

                                                            3. 5

                                                              A blog post by Netgate now links to the original change request: https://reviews.freebsd.org/D26137 – I think this just proves the maxim: “Make a ten line change and you’ll get 11 comments, make a 1000+ lines change and you’ll get LGTM”. The blog post author boasted that there were 92 comments, which I still think is way way too little for a 40k+ lines change that touches security and networking.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                Of all the (main? net, open, free) BSDs, I think FreeBSD is most willing to include all sorts of code.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Very much on topic here on Lobste.rs

                                                              If you’d like see gatekeeping first hand, I invite you to the moderation log here - filter domains only. I was about to mention only dataswamp.org because of Solène’s blog but now noticed that Drew DeVault’s blog got a banned!

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Model 01 and Atreus - both from Keyboardio.

                                                                1. 13

                                                                  Kind request - if you’re mentioning books, apart from exact title, please also include the author(s), year it has been published, edition, and - last but not least - ISBN.

                                                                  Ta! :^)

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    I’m very satisfied with https://github.com/debauchee/barrier (synergy fork/continuation).

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      Barrier doesn’t switch monitors. You need a separate monitor (or monitors) for each machine.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Ah, yes. Slightly different use cases, I guess.

                                                                      2. 2

                                                                        Haim’s solution is pretty ingenius, though!

                                                                        Now that I know of it, I wish there was a DDC/CI tool I could use on OpenBSD :^)

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Update to self.

                                                                          Found this tool - https://github.com/rockowitz/ddcutil - but it is Linux-only, at least for now.

                                                                      1. 17

                                                                        Here’s the summary of the licencing change:

                                                                        We are moving our Apache 2.0-licensed source code in Elasticsearch and Kibana to be dual licensed under Server Side Public License (SSPL) and the Elastic License, giving users the choice of which license to apply. This license change ensures our community and customers have free and open access to use, modify, redistribute, and collaborate on the code. It also [restricts] cloud service providers from offering Elasticsearch and Kibana as a service without contributing back

                                                                        I’m not clear on how this pairs with Drew’s summary of:

                                                                        Elastic is no longer open source [and] has spit in the face of every single one of 1,573 contributors

                                                                        The code that those folk wrote and contributed to still exists, right? Elastic is saying that further code that they themselves distribute, which includes code from those 1,573 contributors, will now be under some other licence. And I’ll grant that that’s not great, but Elastic isn’t sshing into all of your servers and deleting the code running on them. They aren’t retroactively undistributing or relicencing old code. They’re just releasing new code that they write under some other, less good, licence. Potential contributors going forward know that those are the terms going forward but the rug wasn’t pulled out from other them and they’re free to contribute to a fork instead, under whatever terms they like.

                                                                        I’m undoutedly missing all of the context so I feel like I’m missing out on what’s happening that’s so terrible.

                                                                        Yesterday I was offering beer at my bar for free and some folk kindly helped me develop the recipe and brew it. Today I’m going to start charging for it, and hey if you want to keep helping you’re welcome to but the old recipe’s still on the door outside if you want it. I don’t follow what’s worth being up in arms about.

                                                                        1. 7

                                                                          I was just trying to answer a similar comment in the HN thread when I got rate limited, so convenient that I can almost paste it into this thread instead :)

                                                                          The community is built around the upstream project, and has a lot invested in their continued existence as an open source entity. This move will force the community to start from scratch to build a new entity which continues to meet those guarantees - something Elastic plans to capitalize on by capturing more users on its paid offering while the open source community struggles to set up a new entity at the same level of sophistication from scratch.

                                                                          What Elastic done was within their rights, but it wasn’t right - so to speak.

                                                                          1. 5

                                                                            when I got rate limited

                                                                            Fun fact, HN does not actually have rate limiting for regular users. It’s only applied to a few users who are flagged by the mods as annoying, but where a ban would cause more trouble than it’s worth. Beyond that there’s the shadowban or insta-flagging of comments.

                                                                            If you get rate limited, it might be worth sending an email to the mods and asking what to change to get rid of it - that said, being rate limited on HN is something to be proud of ;)

                                                                            1. 13
                                                                              1. 9

                                                                                https://jcs.org/2012/06/13/hellbanned_from_hacker_news

                                                                                The last sentence of that post is the kicker.

                                                                                1. 4
                                                                                2. 6

                                                                                  They have a clickthrough rate limit, and because everything is form-based every click is a new page load. You can hit it pretty easily by hitting the comments link on like 10 posts. I’m not sure sure on how aggressive it is though, or if that’s what Drew is talking about.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    I can middle-click open the comments of the entire frontpage as fast as I can click and I don’t get rate limited. That said, the rate-limit for “troublesome” users applies not just to actions, but also to comments.

                                                                                    I do have enough karma to be able to downvote, though, so maybe that helps.

                                                                                    Your experience sounds like you’re on one of the lower ban levels.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      I wonder if it’s load-based. I was able to click through to the comments for nearly every article on the front page without issue. It may also depend on if you commented recently or something…

                                                                            1. 27

                                                                              /US/ computer science dept rankings. The USA is not the centre of the universe. It’s not even the centre of the Computer Science universe :)

                                                                              1. 6

                                                                                I guess what @pja is trying to say is something along the lines of

                                                                                The title should have read computer science open rankings in the USA

                                                                                It would be quite interresting to see a world ranking, indeed. Given that it isn’t explicit, it does seem a little clickbaity - I fell for it.

                                                                                1. 5

                                                                                  As an American, I’m offended by this statement!

                                                                                  1. 4

                                                                                    It’s not even the centre of the Computer Science universe :)

                                                                                    Remind me, I forget, which country are Google, Microsoft, Apple, Mozilla, Tesla, the Linux Foundation, and the FSF headquartered in again?

                                                                                    1. 12

                                                                                      Applied computing != computer science

                                                                                      1. 9

                                                                                        Where was the World Wide Web born? Where was Linux written?

                                                                                        I don’t see the point with this exercise.

                                                                                    1. 16

                                                                                      Regarding the gripe about Gemini - retrocomputing was never its goal. It was about reforming the browsing experience of the modern user, where code execution or unexpected downloads cannot happen behind your back. Guaranteed TLS was deemed table stakes - for each person who complains about it, there is another who would never touch Gemini if all/much of their browsing was trivially observable by third parties. Gemini was never intended to supplant gopher. The protocol author mentioned continues to maintain both gopher and gemini sites, and gopher would be the right choice when encryption is inappropriate, such as retrocomputing or amateur radio.

                                                                                      1. 8

                                                                                        From the Gemini FAQ:

                                                                                        Gemini may be of interest to people who are: […]

                                                                                        • Interested in low-power computing and/or low-speed networks

                                                                                        So it does seem that there’s some tension there…

                                                                                        1. 4

                                                                                          I don’t quite know what to think of the TLS requirement in Gemini, either, but low-power computing and/or low-speed networks doesn’t necessarily mean old computers and networks. Modern low-power machines with low-speed connections can handle TLS just fine. See e.g. this thread: https://lists.orbitalfox.eu/archives/gemini/2020/002466.html for an older example of someone running a Gemini client on an ESP32.

                                                                                          (Full disclosure: not under this alias – which, for better or for worse, I ended up using in some professional settings – but I am running a Gemini-related project. I have zero investment in it, it’s just for fun, and I was one coin toss away from using Gopher, I’m just sort of familiar with the protocol).

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            Yes, I think it’s a relative statement as well. Low-power systems today are magnitudes more performant. The little 68030 I did some testing on takes over 20 seconds to complete a TLS 1.2 transaction, but even a few years old embedded systems today will run rings around that.

                                                                                            For retro systems, I still say Gopher is the best fit.

                                                                                          2. 2

                                                                                            Yes, contrasting this with @jcs’s post, it does look like a dichotomy.

                                                                                          3. 5

                                                                                            But then, why reinvent the wheel? Instead of implementing a whole new protocol, a more sensible decision would have been to simply develop a modern HTML 3.2 browser without the JS crap. Just freeze the pinnacle of HyperText before the web became the edge of Hell it is today.

                                                                                            1. 4

                                                                                              See the Gemini FAQ section 2.5

                                                                                              1. 4

                                                                                                My memories of those days weren’t so halcyon, just table soup.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  It’s because the point of Gemini is to be intentionally exclusionary.

                                                                                                2. 2

                                                                                                  I agree about Gemini, The one thing I wish they had done differently is used much much simpler crypto for integrity and not bother about confidentiality. Pulling in TLS was a shame as it missed out on a great opportunity.

                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                    So what crytpo, and what libraries for which languages exist for it? I ask because the wisdom is not to invent crypto, nor implement it yourself.

                                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                                  Q -> Ó and W -> Ł!? So obvious! Now, why didn’t I think of that!? ;^)

                                                                                                  Such a simple and elegant solution. Great idea!

                                                                                                  1. 9

                                                                                                    I’m gonna be that guy… it doesn’t work for me because I have JS off.

                                                                                                    I use a different browser for things that legitimately require JS, but this is just static content as far as I can tell.

                                                                                                    1. 10

                                                                                                      I’m gonna be that guy… it doesn’t work for me because I have JS off.

                                                                                                      Did you try enabling awk?

                                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                                        *gawks at thread*

                                                                                                      2. 5

                                                                                                        Worse yet, not only it doesn’t work without JS, it doesn’t even tell the visitor that it needs JS to work—just looks broken.

                                                                                                        The idea to make a website for AWK the language may be a good one, though.

                                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                                          … as long as it’s AWK, not GNU Awk :^)

                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                            That reminds me of The Power of GNU AWK.

                                                                                                        2. 2

                                                                                                          I had the same issues - no content without JS.

                                                                                                          On one hand discussing the weird JS requirement has nothing to do with the original link. On the other hand being verbose about a bad page now is the only way we can influence what kind of quality we expect.

                                                                                                          1. 0

                                                                                                            It even does not work with html off! I just wanna text!

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                                                                                                            Thanks for sharing @atharva! You reminded me of another RSVP software - speedreader - which I need to start using again! :^)