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    I was a creative writing major back in college and used to write quite a bit. As I went through my 20’s and into my 30’s career, kids, etc let little time to write. Would love to get back into it one of these days though!

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      Agreed! Loading the site resulted in about 10 second of actual confusion. Hilarious!

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        Any pointers for one looking to participate that may be a less experienced language dev?

        Would this be good for novice or first time language developers?

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          I specifically made “Turing Tarpit” the first challenge because I thought it’d be really easy. Parsing most Turing Tarpits is not a challenge and interpreting the AST is generally very easy.

          Give the first one a go and see how far you get.

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            It costs a bunch of money, but I know that Jeremy Ashekans created CoffeeScript after reading http://createyourproglang.com/

            Really, it’s actually pretty simple to create your own language, especially if it’s a LISP or something like Brainfuck. http://norvig.com/lispy.html and https://github.com/pocmo/Ruby-Brainfuck/blob/master/bf.rb are pretty small examples, in Ruby and Python.

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              Oh I’m pretty aware (https://github.com/rbxbx/Jibralter <– half working port of lispy to CoffeeScript), I was just trying to drive out conversation and perhaps suggest that such resources should be included on the PLT games site.

              But y'kno, maybe I should be less obtuse and just say things.

              Regardless, all good pointers, cheers :)

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                Ha! Yeah. Whatever, good discussion did result!

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              Aaron Gough also has a few good writeups on the subject here: http://thingsaaronmade.com/blog.html – mostly focused around the example of building a lisp in Ruby.

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                I found that dealing with more traditional ways of writing programming languages with tools like lex and yacc can be sort of onerous, but that using parser combinators makes it fairly fun. You should know how context free grammars work, beyond that, and being able to show that your language is turing complete, it should be straightforward. I personally like the implementation of parser combinators in scala, but I think that many languages have them.

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                Fantastic, I’ve been meaning to give R a try and this is the perfect excuse.

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                  My thoughts exactly. It’s awesome that the folks at Code School put something like this out for free.

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                    Yeah, considering how valuable Try Ruby was for getting people to use Ruby, I think this will do great things for R’s popularity.

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                  I guess a ‘music’ tag would be appropriate too if there was one. It may not be the most useful gem out there, but I always enjoy stumbling across cool random projects like this.

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                    I still haven’t wrapped my head around whether its a good idea or not, but it is interesting… Either way I do think it’ll have some trouble getting off the ground the way they approached the dual license – reminiscent of meteor.js when they first launched.

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                      Yeah, the licensing makes it near impossible for this project to get any traction. Not only is the licensing per-developer (?) for commercial use, the project uses the AGPL for non-commercial use.

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                        It’d be interesting to see an opinion on the AGPL and JavaScript, considering you never really do any ‘linking’ and no object code is produced.

                        Also as long as you’re not doing Node, the AGPL shouldn’t be a problem.

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                        Agreed. Ruby’s best and worst feature is the standard library…

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                          Even without the licence I think I landed on that I think this is a bad idea. Sure it has a lot of feature the native ECMAScript doesn’t but when do we need the method centre? Why base a feature-set on another language instead of figuring out that is relevant for the problem we’re trying to solve. There is also a lot of libraries out there that solves this in a more clever way IMO (e.g Underscore).

                          My biggest problem is introducing new objects for every thing and the need to convert them to native objects if you need to pass them to 3rd party frameworks or even parts of our application that is not converted to using RubyJS yet, especially when you need to convert them recursively. And just to call the methods from the prototype instead of via a method (e.g. Underscore’s each: _.each(array, function() {}) vs. array.each(function() {}))

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                          OBVIOUSLY the whole point is to read it online, for free. But if you absolutely, positively MUST buy a copy, 1. Thanks, and 2. here’s a lobste.rs-specific coupon code to get it for ten bucks off: “lobste.rs” (no quotes). But please, do not feel obligated to buy a copy. read it online, read the original blog posts, and if you feel you have to do something nice, write your own blog post about how helpful combinators are.

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                            Thanks for doing this! I think its really awesome when authors also put their content out there like this. I did buy a copy as well, but not because I felt obligated – the ease of reading in epub format on my iPad is well worth the money. Thanks again!

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                            I’m glad to see @andrewkkirk documenting this process. For many of us the time spent learning to program is a distant memory, and I think another look at the process, even through someone else eyes, can be enlightening.

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                              Yep. A big

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                                  It’s been fun to write and see the feedback. It’s amazing how developers can’t really remember the beginning. It’s become so ingrained that they “just kinda do it”.

                                  Thanks @rob and @steveklabnik!

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                                    Here I was missing out on all these thumbs up. @steveklabnik

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                                      ?

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                                        Awesome! Appeared in both the email and on my screen. Great job. ?❤??

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                                    This is an interesting approach to rewarding developers, but I have concerns about how they’ve made this survey based – I could see a situation where developers could try to game the system and spam their users in attempts to drive greater monthly rewards.

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                                      Sounds pretty cool, but it looks like the site is down at the moment – looking forward to checking it out!

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                                        My DNS funds happened to run out at the perfect time. Site’s been up for a few hours now!

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                                        Thanks for the mention @jcs. I noticed when you posted this that there are only notifications for comment mentions and not story mentions. I’ve just added a pull request to get that working.

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                                          Should this have the “news” tag?

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                                            Yeah – probably should – maybe jcs can add it

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                                            As a stripe customer, I think this is pretty awesome. We had to build a workaround for per-seat subscription pricing and having that officially supported now is great.

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                                              I’m not entirely sure if I tagged this right, but EDN looks pretty interesting.

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                                                It seems like it shouldn’t be “news”

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                                                I would also recommend “Learning Go”, a free PDF book. http://www.miek.nl/projects/learninggo/index.html

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                                                  Thanks! I hadn’t see this one before.

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                                                  It was working fine few hours ago. Now it constantly throwing cloudflare access request page and that page isn’t working.

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                                                    Working fine for me right now.

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                                                      Right. they are probably blocking access based on region or range of ip addresses… pain point is, even after dealing with barely readable captcha its not working.