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    If your problem is Google being greedy for data the solution is fairly simple: get Google off your device. In other words, make sure your devices run - for as much as possible - only code you explicitly allow them to run.

    This can be done with Android. It can not be done with iOS. In both cases you’ll have to contend with the fact that the ‘radio code’ - the blob of binary code which runs the whatever-G radio the device is equipped with - can be used to all sorts of nefarious things and it fairly certain to either contain loads of known bugs or intentionally introduced backdoors for the TLA’s of the world. Apart from that radio code the device will run an operating system and user applications, both of which can be under your control when running an AOSP-derived Android distribution. The device does not need to run any Google-proprietary code to be able to run Android apps (apart from a few which insist on interfacing with Google Play Services).

    You seem to trust Apple to ‘do the right thing’ but you do not have anything to base that trust on other than feel-good statements by the company and its disciples. I trust Apple just as much as I trust Google or any other commercial enterprise. With this I mean to say that I trust them to look out for their bottom line as that is what makes them tick. Google currently has a different perspective on how to get that number as high as possible from the way Apple tries to maximise it but maximise the number they shall. As I don’t trust either of them I do my best to stay away from them as much as I can: no Apple anything, no Google Chrome, no stock Android, no Google apps, no Google services, no Google Play. Still I have a fully functional phone running Android, it just happens to run free software wherever possible, minus that currently unavoidable radio blob that is…

    1. 4

      trust Apple to ‘do the right thing’ but you do not have anything to base that trust on other than feel-good statements by the company and its disciples.

      We have a little bit more than that.

      If Apple got caught violating the trust of users, that bell would ring around the world.

      I don’t trust either of them.

      You trust Google. You haven’t read the source code of your phone; it’s like 50GB download last I checked. These builds scripts download more code over the Internet. Nobody can audit that. You also trust the people who made your “custom” android-building toolchain. You trust them (among other things) to identify and remove anything naughty Google has done. Not to mention you trust the guys who made your phone and all the components within. I have no idea who you’d sue with a random Android phone (some distant Chinese company?), let alone with some “custom Android” installed on it..

      no stock Android

      Running a custom Android makes you a QA of one. It’s like running Gentoo. You get to learn from nobody’s mistakes but your own.

      1. 1

        I haven’t read all source code, only those parts of it needed to port Android to the three devices I ported it to. Other people have read other parts of it, all of them outside of Google. I’m not the only one using this particular custom Android distribution (which started out as Cyanogen but now is called Lineage, parts of which I remove as I don’t need them, more so in the Cyanogen-days when they started messing with their own ‘Cyanogen login’).

        That bit about running custom Android or Gentoo implying you have a ‘QA of one’ is just plain silly as you will probably understand yourself. Both custom Android as well as Gentoo builds come from the same source - plus or minus a few tailored modifications - and are built using the same tool chain. The results are very similar if not identical (with reproducible builds), except for the modified bits that is. I won’t loose any sleep over the fact that my personal modifications have a ‘QA of one’, just like I don’t loose sleep over the fact that the house I built and live in has a ‘QA of one’, the bread I bake has a ‘QA of one’ or any other fruits of my labour are not certified by some random committee.I trust my own observations well enough, the thing works, it does what I want it to do, it is silent on the network unless I want it to send or receive data, it runs for more than a week on a single battery charge where stock distributions won’t last more than 2 days.

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          I don’t loose sleep over the fact that the house I built and live in has a ‘QA of one’

          I live in civilisation though, and didn’t build my own house.

          I do programming.

          Some other guy builds houses.

          The guy that built my house built hundreds of houses, and he had to get trained and certified by a random committee that trained and certified hundreds and perhaps thousands of other guys, and so on.

          I think him making a mistake that harms me is unlikely, but my civilisation will promises me recourse if he does.

          I like that. I don’t want to learn how to build houses, since it would certainly take time away from my programming.

          Other people have read other parts of it, all of them outside of Google.

          Given the preposterousness of the claim (reading 50GB of anything), I’m not sure I understand what you expect here. I don’t believe you?

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            Please calm down and think about what you just said:

            Other people have read other parts of it, all of them outside of Google.

            Given the preposterousness of the claim (reading 50GB of anything), I’m not sure I understand what you expect here. I don’t believe you?

            Read again and you’ll see that I stated that other people have read other parts of it, not that other people read all of it. Of course others did read all of it, if only the ones who wrote it in the first place and those who did code reviews but that is besides the point. Also besides the point is the fact that the amount of source used for an Android build is not even close to 50 GB, you might be confused by the size of the repo versus the size of the code used for a single build.

            But… the thing is that you on the one hand seem to blindly trust Apple - because that is what we are talking about here - without having the ability to so much as peek at the code, while casting aspersion on the idea of building a distribution for your own device ‘because you can not read all the code’. While I’m sure Apple is happy to have customers like you who trust them blindly this does not mean it is the rational thing to do (when thinking about ‘trust’, it can be more rational economically as building your own takes time and effort), certainly not more rational than building your own

            I think the conclusion to draw here is that you prefer to put your trust in others and look to your civilisation for recourse when those others fail your trust, while I prefer to trust my own instinct and insight and as such like to get hands-on when building things - whether it be software or hardware (from electronics to houses). To each his own, I guess.

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              I think the conclusion to draw here is that you prefer to put your trust in others and look to your civilisation for recourse when those others fail your trust, while I prefer to trust my own instinct and insight and as such

              or, it is my own instinct and insight and such where I come to a completely different conclusion: that civilisation has value. Seriously.

              the thing is that you on the one hand seem to blindly trust Apple - because that is what we are talking about here

              I trust one party who might fail me, who has a lot to lose, whereas you trust dozens of parties, any of which might fail you, and none of which has anything to lose.

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        CopperheadOS was a great Android ROM for this. Since the lead developer left the company, I suppose plain AOSP is the next best bet? I’m also looking forward to the Librem5 phone.

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          If you’re interested in CopperheadOS, you might like this presentation by Konstantin Ryabitsev[1]:

          Life Behind the Tinfoil: A Look at Qubes and Copperhead (youtube)

          [1] Director of IT Infrastructure Security at The Linux Foundation

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        Um. Following this link I got redirected to some kind of spam website, that was blocked by my browser.

        Edit: clicked through a bunch more times to try and reproduce, got something slightly different:

        1. 2

          I’ve seen this on compromised WordPress sites before. If it’s the same as what I investigated previously, they do something like push the spam/ad/etc. to 1% of traffic and that makes it difficult to inspect/discover.

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            Does it say Comcast in there? Could that be targeted to that connection?

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              That’s… worrying. It’s a bog-standard wordpress site. What happens if you go to https://zwischenzugs.com?

              1. 1

                I clicked through a dozen times and nothing happened. It definitely didn’t happen every time on the original link either.

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                  Looks like it’s a malicious ad coming in. Hard to say which ad network it came from, since the site is loading an obscene number of them…

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              I really like Ansible and I’m totally going to see if I can use all or part of this tutorial.

              I bothers me a bit that updating OpenBSD 6.3 -> 6.4, per the official documentation, requires booting the installation media to preform the upgrade. In the world of could providers and VMs, I want to put together a guide to attempt to do this semi-inplace with a single reboot.

              I’m glad I read all the release notes before attempting anything though. The OpenSMTPD configuration grammar has changed entirely. I’m going to have to redo all my work in a VM to make sure it all still works.

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                The big issue with “in place” upgrades in the OpenBSD world is that there is no guarantee the ABI between X.Y and X.Y+1 will be the same. This can cause all sorts of issues while doing in place upgrades. For example, tar, once replaced by the updated binary could segfault for every subsequent call. This would leave the system in an unknown state.

                I wrote an upgrade tool a while back (snap) that could be used to upgrade from release to release. The ABI issue was hit every couple of releases, so I removed the option to upgrade releases.

                I am not saying it’s impossible.. just that you will basically have to backup everything prior to doing an install.

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                  Following -current a in-place upgrade mostly just works, but I also always keep a new bsd.rd ready in case in-place fails, reboot into bsd.rd and upgrade will fix it.

                  But I also have switched to a script that downloads sets, patches bsd.rd and reboots. Much less hassle and minimum downtime.

                  1. 1

                    This. I do the same - download bsd.rd, add an auto_upgrade.conf file to the image, then use that bsd.rd on all my systems to upgrade them. Just copy the patched bsd.rd over /bsd on the target, reboot, wait a few minutes, and the box is back up on the new release. I wrote my own script ages ago, but nowadays the upobsd port can take care of the patching bsd.rd bit.

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                  I want to put together a guide to attempt to do this semi-inplace with a single reboot.

                  There is such a guide in the official upgrade notes. The only reason it suggests two reboots is KARL.

                  1. 1

                    Back in the day, I just had a script that downloaded, extracted sets and install a new bsd. Then I rebooted it and ran another script that took care of etc changes and new users, cleanup up old files no longer needed (according to release notes). Last step was just a pkg_add -U.

                    I didn’t run into issues but I was aware of the risks and being on my own when it broke ;-)

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                    I agree with Jono’s Bacon take [1] on it and this sums it up for me:

                    His post today is a clear example of him putting Linux as a project ahead of his own personal ego.

                    Also the full code of conduct [2].

                    [1] https://www.jonobacon.com/2018/09/16/linus-his-apology-and-why-we-should-support-him/

                    [2] https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux.git/tree/Documentation/process/code-of-conduct.rst?id=8a104f8b5867c682d994ffa7a74093c54469c11f

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                      I found it a great read as well and his blog has more. Thank you for submitting this.

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                        I see there you’ve made a note that this was posted to Schneier’s blog, can you share that post link as well? Thank you.

                        1. 1

                          That’s where I posted all my early design sketches and essays. There were a bunch of people in software and hardware like Clive Robinson that gave great peer review and debates. We had a meme, “you heard it first on Schneier’s blog,” where news reports, CompSci papers, or new products would echo what we already discussed.

                          Replacing subverted and/or low-quality Intel chips was something we discussed repeatedly way before Meltdown/Spectre with people like Clive using MCU’s for guards. I kept telling people about VAMP and Leon3 CPU’s which should block many attacks. I ended up just posting an exhaustive list here. RobertT in that discussion is mixed-signal, hardware specialist that spends much of his time obfuscating or reverse engineering ASIC’s. My analog, attack predictions were just rehashes of kind of stuff he was seeing or doing on a daily basis. That man almost single-handedly made me stop believing computers could be trusted. Clive and I recommend pencil, paper, and old school methods for high-security these days with high-assurance security as just risk reduction.

                          1. 2

                            Thank you. I wasn’t aware that this had taken place some time ago.

                            1. 1

                              The root problems were discovered around 1992. Security community just ignored it all like everything high-assurance, security community did. I had a rant on that here whose main article is a comment with the links to that work. We knew about cache- and microarchitecture-based leaks in 1992. I’ve been recommending mitigation for a long time. Well, mitigation attempts haha. Mainstream security often ignores stuff done out of their own circles or standards. Politics. There’s plenty of work out there waiting to be used or improved on, though. I post a lot of it here since there’s smart programmers here with unusual quality & security focus.

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                          Reminded me of FOAF: http://www.foaf-project.org

                          1. 2

                            Now that takes me back…

                            1. 2

                              I remember being so excited about FOAF when I learned about it around 2005. Those were the heady days of blogs and RSS feeds and open APIs.

                              1. 2

                                There’s a little bit of tinfoil-hattery going on in that article, but I don’t think he’s totally wrong. The Internet has matured to the point now where most of the walled gardens are about as big as they’re going to get, so the only growth potential left is destroy the community gardens. It’s not at all unlike Ford and GM’s deliberate nationwide dismantling of public transportation throughout the 20th century.

                              1. 3

                                In progress:

                                Recently finished:

                                • Building E-commerce Applications, a complete waste of money and basically just a lazy compilation of undedited blog posts. Booooo.

                                • Come and Take It: The Gun Printer’s Guide to Thinking Free, by Cody Wilson of Defense Distributed fame. I finished this probably a week before the current kerfluffle started. There’s a whoooole lot of self-congratulatory bullshit and bluster in this, as Wilson is first and foremost (in my opinion) an attention whore, but buried in there are a couple of good reflections on the role of toolmakers in the pursuit of independence.

                                • Come as You Are, a delightful book by Emily Nagoski that I heard about through OhJoySexToy (webcomic about sexual health and practices). It covers a lot of interesting academic information about sex, attraction, and romance, and can help in debugging certain failure modes of relationships or in preemptively being a better partner.

                                1. 3

                                  buried in there are a couple of good reflections on the role of toolmakers in the pursuit of independence.

                                  We cannot be free until we control the means of production? That sounds like a good reflection, all right :-)

                                  (Note: this may sound like I’m trying to rile you. I’m not, I am genuinely amused to see Marx echoed in this unexpected context.)

                                  1. 4

                                    As the good Chairman once said, “Political power grows out of the barrel of the gun…”.

                                    A lot of Marxists, communists, and libertarians I think would actually have a lot to talk to each other about if they weren’t so busy engaging in culture war these days.

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                                      It isn’t too surprising, since all three sprang from the same philosophical tradition.

                                      A funny aside: a friend of mine recently noted, with regard to economics, we’re all Marxists now.

                                      1. 3

                                        Yup! Certain groups don’t really like to think about it, but because Marx did the first serious systematic analysis of how economies worked on a global scale (and coined the word “capitalism”, although contrary to popular opinion he did not coin but merely redefined “communism”), all modern economics owes a debt to Marx at least as big as the one it owes to Von Neumann. Even those opposed to Marx’s conclusions are using methods he pioneered to fight them. (Or, to be more direct: “economics begins with Marx” / “Karl Marx invented capitalism”)

                                        1. 2

                                          You might like this recent podcast episode from BBC Thinking Allowed: Marx and Marxism: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b2kpm0

                                  2. 3

                                    Come and Take It: The Gun Printer’s Guide to Thinking Free, by Cody Wilson of Defense Distributed fame. I finished this probably a week before the current kerfluffle started. There’s a whoooole lot of self-congratulatory bullshit and bluster in this, as Wilson is first and foremost (in my opinion) an attention whore, but buried in there are a couple of good reflections on the role of toolmakers in the pursuit of independence.

                                    This was on my reading list; but, after I did the ’ol Amazon “Look Inside,” I took it off because it looked like the signal/noise would be unacceptable. Please give a shout if it ends up being worthwhile. I watched a few of his pre-DD/early-DD lectures on philosopy, and the guy gave me stuff to chew on.

                                    1. 2

                                      So, again, having finished it I think the same points could be handled in a pamphlet instead of the drawn-out narrative Wilson attenpts.

                                      1. 1

                                        Thanks for humouring my obviously lacking reading comprehension skills. 🤦🏾‍♂️

                                      2. 1

                                        Lectures on philosophy? Had no idea he was into that, mind sharing some links?

                                        1. 2

                                          Cody Wilson Philosophy, Part I is the first of a two part series.

                                          Why I printed a gun is short and sweet; but, doesn’t get too deep.

                                    1. 2

                                      This is really a non-issue as far as I’m concerned.

                                      Browsers (either standalone or with plugins) let users turn off images, turn off Javascript, override or ignore stylesheets, block web fonts, block video/flash, and block advertisements and tracking. Users can opt-out of almost any part of the web if it bothers them.

                                      On top of that, nobody’s twisting anybody’s arm to visit “heavy” sites like CNN. If CNN loads too much crap, visit a lighter site. They probably won’t be as biased as CNN, either.

                                      Nobody pays attention to these rants because at the end of the day they’re just some random people stating their arbitrary opinions. Rewind 10 or 15 or 20 years and Flash was killing the web, or Javascript, or CSS, or the img tag, or table based layouts, or whatever.

                                      1. 10

                                        Rewind 10 or 15 or 20 years and Flash was killing the web, or Javascript, or CSS, or the img tag, or table based layouts, or whatever

                                        Flash and table based layouts really were and, to the extent that you still see them, are either hostile or opaque to people who require something like a screen reader to use a website. Abuse of javascript or images excludes people with low end hardware. Sure you can disable these things but it’s all too common that there is no functional fallback (apparently I can’t even vote or reply here without javascript being on).

                                        Are these things “killing the web” in the sense that the web is going to stop existing as a result? Of course not, but the fact that they don’t render the web totally unusable is not a valid defense of abuses of these practices.

                                        1. 3

                                          I wouldn’t call any of those things “abuses”, though.

                                          Maybe it all boils down to where the line is drawn between supported hardware and hardware too old to use on the modern web, and everybody will have different opinions. Should I be able to still browser the web on my old 100 Mhz Petnium with 8 Mb of RAM? I could in 1996…

                                          1. 12

                                            Should I be able to still browser the web on my old 100 Mhz Petnium with 8 Mb of RAM?

                                            To view similar information? Absolutely. If what I learn after viewing a web page hasn’t changed, then neither should the requirements to view it. If a 3D visualization helps me learn fluid dynamics, ok, bring it on, but if it’s page of Cicero quotes, let’s stick with the text, shall we?

                                            1. 5

                                              I wouldn’t call any of those things “abuses”, though.

                                              I think table based layouts are really pretty uncontroversially an abuse. The spec explicitly forbids it.

                                              The rest are tradeoffs, they’re not wrong 100% of the time. If you wanted to make youtube in 2005 presumably you had to use flash and people didn’t criticize that, it was the corporate website that required flash for no apparent reason that drew fire. The question that needs to be asked is if the cost is worth the benefit. The reason people like to call out news sites is they haven’t really seen meaningfully new features in two decades (they’re still primarily textual content, presented with pretty similar style, maybe with images and hyperlinks. All things that 90s hardware could handle just fine) but somehow the basic experience requires 10? 20? 100 times the resources? What did we buy with all that bandwidth and CPU time? Nothing except user-hostile advertising as far as I can tell.

                                              1. 2

                                                If you wanted to make youtube in 2005 presumably you had to use flash and people didn’t criticize that

                                                At the time (ok, 2007, same era) I had a browser extension that let people view YouTube without flash by swapping the flash embed for a direct video embed. Was faster and cleaner than the flash-based UI.

                                                1. 1
                                                2. 2

                                                  I’d say text-as-images and text-as-Flash from the pre-webfont era are abuses too.

                                            2. 7

                                              On top of that, nobody’s twisting anybody’s arm to visit “heavy” sites like CNN. If CNN loads too much crap, visit a lighter site.

                                              Or just use http://lite.cnn.io

                                              1. 2

                                                nobody’s twisting anybody’s arm to visit “heavy” sites like CNN

                                                Exactly. It’s not a “web developers are making the web bloated” problem, it’s a “news organizations are desperate to make money and are convinced that personalized advertising and tons of statistics (Big Data!!) will help them” problem.

                                                Lobsters is light, HN, MetaFilter, Reddit, GitHub, GitLab, personal sites/blogs, various wikis, forums, issue trackers, control panels… Most of the stuff I use is really not bloated.

                                                If you’re reading general world news all day… stop :)

                                              1. 14

                                                Microsoft lets you download a Windows 10 ISO for free now; I downloaded one yesterday to set up a test environment for something I’m working on. With WSL and articles like this, I thought maybe I could actually consider Windows as an alternative work environment (I’ve been 100% some sort of *nix for decades).

                                                Nope. Dear lord, the amount of crapware and shovelware. Why the hell does a fresh install of an operating system have Skype, Candy Crush, OneDrive, ads in the launcher and an annoying voice-assistent who just starts talking out of nowhere?

                                                1. 5

                                                  I’ll give you ads in the launcher – that sucks a big one – but Skype and OneDrive don’t seem like crapware. Mac OS comes with Messages, FaceTime and iCloud; it just so happens that Apple’s implementations of messaging and syncing are better than Microsoft’s. Bundling a messaging program and a file syncing program seems helpful to me, and Skype is (on paper) better than what Apple bundles because you can download it for any platform. It’s a shame that Skype in particular is such an unpleasant application to use.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    It’s not even that they’re useful, it’s that they’re not optional. I’m bothered by the preinstalled stuff on Macs too, and the fact that you have to link your online accounts deeply into the OS.

                                                    I basically am a “window manager and something to intelligently open files by type kinda guy.” Anything more than that I’m not gonna use and thus it bothers me. I’m a minimalist.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      I am too, and I uninstall all that stuff immediately; Windows makes it very easy to remove it. “Add or Remove Programs” lets you remove Skype and OneDrive with one click each.

                                                  2. 2

                                                    Free?? I guess you can download an ISO but a license for Windows 10 Home edition is $99. The better editions are even more. WSL also doesn’t work on Home either. I think you need Professional or a higher edition.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      It works on Home.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Yup. Works great on Home according to this minus Docker which you need Hyper-V support for.

                                                        https://www.reddit.com/r/bashonubuntuonwindows/comments/7ehjyj/is_wsl_supported_on_windows_10_home/

                                                    2. 1

                                                      I always forget about this until I have to rebuild Windows and then I have to go find my scripts to uncrap Windows 10. Now I don’t do anything that could break Windows because I know my scripts are out of date.

                                                      It’s better since I’ve removed all the garbage, but holy cats that experience is awful.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      From what I understood, this doesn’t apply to Apple’s FileVault. Mostly metadata leaking from previewing images from other encrypted drives like Veracrypt.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Hmm. Is this related to bsdcan?

                                                        1. 2
                                                          1. 1

                                                            Yes, Theo gave an impromptu talk where he expressed frustration at rumors of openbsd being untrustworthy and then speculated on possible future intel problems. Screaming happened. But now it seems he was right.

                                                            Though the bigger issue of embargo’s and their value remains.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Screaming happened.

                                                              To be clear, the screaming was not done by Theo.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                I wish people would stop saying he gave a talk / presentation because that’s not what it was. This was a BOF session. It is a group discussion about a predefined topic and Theo was the BOF organizer. This is why he was talking to the crowd and asking questions. It wasn’t to attack anyone or inflame the situation; it was entirely within the spirit of the BOF.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              For those who don’t know the author, he’s been around for a while and even was a member of the team that “started” Canonical and Ubuntu [1]

                                                              [1] https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BenjaminMakoHill

                                                              1. 8

                                                                I was expecting to see a reference to the fairphone in the article but none. Guess FP needs more marketing people :)

                                                                p.s. it seems the FP CEO announced today that Android 7.1 is coming to the FP2 so it’s paying up! https://www.fairphone.com/en/2018/05/08/keeping-your-phone-longer-refreshed/

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I don’t do it (and it’s never been something I’ve even considered). If I was really concerned about reading the replies without reading anything that I’ve already seen, I’d use the mailing list feature.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Thank you. I’ve thought about it but you I would get all stories and not just one particular thread.

                                                                    And even if I could, reading email for me is sub-par in contrast to read it here. The layout is so clean and easy to zoom on any browser (mobile included) ;-)

                                                                  1. 6

                                                                    I have returned from a week of holiday, so have spent my morning deleting emails and marking hipchat conversations as read. I’m in the middle of a vendor selection process, and this week is about crossing out the clearly bad choices and arranging to talk to the maybe good options.

                                                                    I’m also negotiating a change to my contract to adopt a four-day week, talking to my CEO soon.

                                                                    I’ve applied to volunteer at the National Museum of Computing.

                                                                    I spent the weekend hacking on an app for managing notes on research papers. It’s nearly ready for a first release.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      National Museum of Computing

                                                                      Nice, I really enjoyed the part of the visit of the VT terminals where I typed for a bit ;-)

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      Really depends on your needs but for a home desktop and speaking about OpenBSD, I couldn’t use it because of Skype/Google Hangouts because of problems getting my webcam going.

                                                                      But if I did, I would try Firefox webrtc [1] next with the caveat that is still something that is being worked on [2].

                                                                      [1] https://mozilla.github.io/webrtc-landing/gum_test.html

                                                                      [2] https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1437670

                                                                        1. 6

                                                                          This is just gold:

                                                                          Under the new patch, Linux listed all x86-compatible chips as vulnerable, including AMD processors. Since the patch tended to slow down the processor, AMD wasn’t thrilled about being included. The day after Christmas, AMD engineer Tom Lendacky sent an email to the public Linux kernel listserve explaining exactly why AMD chips didn’t need a patch.

                                                                          “The AMD microarchitecture does not allow memory references, including speculative references, that access higher privileged data when running in a lesser privileged mode when that access would result in a page fault,” Lendacky wrote.

                                                                          A very interesting article. Would be more interesting to know the details behind the above gaffe — did the AMD engineer break his NDA, or did he come up with the root cause behind the patch independently?

                                                                          TBH, regarding discussions on public listserve, it seems really weird that these kinds of things wouldn’t be done behind closed doors — just because the software is OSS, doesn’t mean that every single change has to be thoroughly explained on the public mailing lists, like Verge seems to suggest. In the BSD world, for example, internal developer-only (i.e., committer-only) mailing lists do exist, which, for better or worse, make it easy to not unneccessarily publicise such changes, whilst still gettting the exposure and feedback from the developer community.

                                                                          1. 16

                                                                            When you know a secret for too long, you forget what’s supposed to be secret and what’s not. Also, when too many people know, you forget who knows and doesn’t. You forget when it’s secret and when it’s public. When the secret topic is half secret and half public, you forget precisely what’s secret and what’s not. Etc., etc.

                                                                            Governments, with 100 years of practice, screw this up. Amateurs are doomed.